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Full text of "Annual report of the town officers of Wakefield Massachusetts : including the vital statistics for the year"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Federally funded with LSTA funds through the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofto2009wake 



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3 1392 00436 6385 




TOWN 

of 




198th 



Annual Report 




2009 



On the cover. . . 

The Rockery is suddenly awash in the colors of early spring. 

Photo By Mike Angel 



198th 
annual 
report 




OF THE TOWN OFFICERS OF 

Wakefield 

Massachusetts 

including the vital Statistics for the 
year ending December thirty-first 

2009 



V. 



Wakefield Item Press, Wakefield, Mass. 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Town of Wakefield 




Population - 2009 Census - 23,895 

2000 Federal Census - 24,804 

Congressman, 6th District - John F. Tierney of Salem 

Councillor, 6th District - Michael J. Callahan of Medford 

Senator, 3rd Middlesex District - Richard R. Tisei of Wakefield 

Town Officers 

*Selectmen 

John F. Carney, Chairman - 2010 
John B. Encarnacao - 2010 James E. Good - 2010 

Patrick S. Glynn - 201 1 Betsy Sheeran - 201 1 

Paul R. DiNocco - 2012 Albert J. Turco, Vice Chairman - 2012 

**Town Administrator 

Stephen P. Maio 

*Town Clerk 

Mary KGalvin- 2011 

Tax Collector 

Kathleen M. Kelly - 2012 

*Moderator 

William Harbison Carroll - 2010 

Treasurer 

John J. McCarthy, Jr. - 2010 

**Town Accountant 

Kevin M. Gill 

**Town Counsel 

Thomas A. Mullen 

Executive Secretary/Town Accountant 

John J. McCarthy - Emeritus 
January 26, 1991 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



** 



Advisory Board of Public Works 



Robert P. Curran, Cr 


Lairman 


2010 


C. Lee Binnig 




2011 


James A. Lapery 


*School Committee 


2009 


Lisa A. Butler 




2010 


Kevin S. Piskadlo 




2010 


Carmen M. Urbonas 




2010 


Christopher J. Callanan 


2011 


Daniel P. Lieber 




2011 


Cheryl A. Ford 




2012 


Anthony V. Guardia, 


Chairman 


2012 



*Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational School 

4 years 

Vincent J. Carisella 2012 

*Lucius Beebe Memorial Library Trustees 

Donna West Conlon 2010 

John Havelick, Jr. 2010 

Timothy F. Healy 2010 

Michael J. Bourque 2011 

Nancy C. Delaney 2011 

Harold D. Regan 2011 

Christopher N. Janicki 2012 

Kevin Patrick Scanlon 2012 

Cindy A. Schatz 2012 



**Town Planner 




Paul Reavis 




*Town Planning Board 




Matthew Lowry 


2010 


Paul J. Semenza 


2011 


William M. D'Amore 


2012 


Frederick J. Emilianowicz, Jr. 


2013 


James Terrence French 


2014 


Catherine M. Johnston, Associate 


2010 


♦Board of Health 




Elaine M. Silva, Interim Appointee, Secretary 


2010 


Ann McGonigle Santos, Chairman 


2011 


Laurel Skinder Gourville, Vice Chair 


2012 


'Board of Assessors 




Paul G. Faler, Chairman 


2010 


Sebastian P. Tine 


2011 


Jane A. D'Addario, Secretary 


2012 



♦Municipal Gas & Light Commissioners 

Stephen J. McGrail 2010 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Kevin T. Haggerty, Interim Appointee, Secretary 


2010 


Jack Warchol, Chairman 


2011 


Kenneth J. Chase, Jr. 


2012 


Michael P. McCarthy 


2012 


*Wakefield Housing Authority 




Arthur J. Rotondi, Jr. 


2010 


Eugene N. Ruggiero, Chairman 


2011 


Alfred S. Confalone, Vice Chairman 


2012 


Jane Good 


2014 


Mary Therese Daniels, State Appointee 


2012 


*Constables 




Gerard S. Alterio, Jr. 


2010 


Richard 0. Bayrd 


2010 


Robert E. Foley 


2011 


**Board of Registrars 




Jane Good, Chairman 


2009 


Eugenia M. Coffin 


2010 


Kathryn D. Morgan 


2011 


Mary K. Galvin 


2011 


**Finance Committee 




Joseph B. Bertrand 


2010 


Brian Cusack 


2010 


Keith LaGraves 


2010 


Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman 


2010 


Craig T. Williams 


2010 


Joel S. Chansky 


2011 


Robert J. Cunningham, Vice Chairman 


2011 


Quirino M. Iannazzo 


2011 


Jeanne MacNevin 


2011 


Alfred A. Palmerino 


2011 


Kathleen M. Beaulieu 


2012 


Anne P. Danehy 


2012 


Dennis P. Hogan, Jr. 


2012 


Philip F. McCarty 


2012 


J. Edward Surette, III 


2012 


**Historical Commission 




Nancy L. Bertrand, Chair 


2011 


Juliane M. Gerace 


2011 


Gene A. Moulton 


2011 


Marcia J. Phinney 


2011 


**Recreation Commission 




Cyril R. Bode 


2009 


Jeanne Stinson 


2009 


Susan Hickey 


2010 


Richard Stevens 


2010 


Daniel P. Crowley 


2011 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



Christine M. Gargano, Chair 


2011 


Anthony J. Longo 


2012 


Joseph V. Tringale 


2012 


**Conservation Commission 




Sally T. Green 


2009 


Frank J. Luciani, Jr., Chairman 


2009 


David N. Peterson 


2009 


Frank Calandra 


2010 


Warren M. Laskey 


2010 


Robert J. Romano 


2011 


Matthew E. Robbins, Associate Member 


2009 


David M. Sullivan, Associate Member 


2010 


James A. Valeriani, Associate Member 


2010 


**Capital Planning Committee 




Lisa A. Butler 


2010 


Robert P. Edson 


2010 


Thomas P. MacKay 


2010 


Cyril R. Bode 


2011 


Anne P. Danehy 


2011 


Franklin C. Leone, Jr. 


2012 


Shaun S. Margerison, Chairman 


2012 



**Town Energy Conservation Committee 

Wendy Dennis, Chairman 

Robert R. Darnell 
Matthew D. Jewett 

Jennifer L. Kallay 
Warren W. Magoon 

Pooja M. Parsons 

Stephen D. Shoap 

**World War II Memorial Committee 

Thomas H. Collins 

John B. Encarnacao 

Sandra P. Gass 

Charles L. Geier 

Phyllis J. Hull, Chairman 

Frank J. Luciani, Jr. 

Frances L. Marshall 

Michelle F. Marshall 

Leo M. McMillan 

James H. Murphy 

Richard W. Pearson 

Richard F. Stinson 

William J. Walsh 

William J. Walsh, Jr. 

Christopher M. Tarr, Associate Member 

**CATV Advisory Committee 

Jane D'Addario 2009 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Marian Joy Schilling 


2010 


Laurel N. Hellerstein 


2011 


Daniel P. Lieber 


2011 


Steve Zolud, Chairman 


2011 


^Commission on Disability Issues 




Larry A. Hardacker 


2009 


Phyllis B. Pearl-Baxter 


2009 


Thomas F. Wholley, Jr. 


2009 


Lois E. Jarema 


2010 


Supt. Joan Landers 


2010 


Marc A. Luca, Chairman 


2010 


Jeanne M. Boland 


2011 


Anthony V. Guardia 


2011 


Warren W. Magoon 


2011 


**Council on Aging 




Robert P. Curran 


2009 


Delia M. Giuffre, Vice Chair 


2009 


Robert 0. Hale, Chairman 


2009 


Viola S. Simeola 


2009 


Virginia A. Hopkins, Secretary 


2010 


Mary A. Kelly 


2011 


Janet K. Miranda 


2011 


**Fence Viewers 




Richard D. Cardillo 


2009 


Vincent J. Carisella 


2009 


Thomas E. Humphreys 


2009 


**Wakefield Cultural Council 




Nancy L. Bertrand 


2009 


Janice L. Harrington 


2009 


Virginia E. McGrail 


2009 


Marcia J. Phinney 


2009 


Marian Joy Schilling 


2009 


Jill Tapper 


2009 


Julia L. Thomson 


2009 


**Board of Appeals 




Richard 0. Bayrd 


2009 


James H. McBain, ALA 


2009 


Michael L. Pierce, Chairman 


2009 


Brian E. Falvey 


2010 


Charles L. Tarbell 


2011 


Vacancy Alternate 


2009 


David W. Hatfield, Alternate 


2010 


Tiziano Doto, Alternate 


2011 



**Wakefield Permanent Building Committee 

Joseph B. Bertrand 2009 

John B. Encarnacao, Chairman 2009 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



Richard P. Hudson 2009 

Thomas P. MacKay 2009 

Kevin W. Ryder 2009 

James A. Lapery 2010 

Charles R. Kanouff 2010 

Philip C. Crosscup 2011 

Michael Giannattasio 2011 

**Financial Study Committee 
Brian D. McCoubrey, Chairman 

Marc D. Cataldo 

Gayle H. Edson 
Elizabeth A. Hendriks 

Laurie A. Hunt 

Frank A. Micelli 

Joanne S. Reilly 

Charles P. Slavin 

**Sweetser Lecture Advisory Committee 

Ellen M. Gallant, Chair 2009 

Jeanne Blumer 2009 

Robert L. Burk 2009 

Richard A. Henshaw 2009 

Helen Hincman 2009 

Susan K. Kilkelly 2009 

Lorraine Lackey 2009 

Serena J. Murley 2009 

Sara M. Murphy 2009 

Joan R. Neale 2009 

Yvonne Scott 2009 

Joseph G. Spear 2009 

Joanne M. Turco 2009 

Dr. E. Turner Lewis, Consultant 2009 

James Weiner Wulff, Consultant 2009 

**E vents Planning Committee 

Sel. Paul R. DiNocco, Chairman 

Arthur Assimakopoulos 

Christopher M. Barrett 

Daniel L. Benjamin, Jr. 

Wendy Dennis 

Susan M. Majeski 

Pooja Parsons 

Cassandra A. Semenza 

Laura Marie Small 

Diane C. Spadafora 

Susan M. Wetmore 

**Chief of Police 

Richard E. Smith 

**Fire Chief 

Michael J. Sullivan 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



**Dog Officer/Animal Inspector 

Kenneth J. Stache 

**Emergency Management 
Michael J. Sullivan 

**Inspector of Buildings 

John J. Roberto, III 

**Parking Clerk 

Michael J. Nasella 

**Plumbing/Gas Inspector 

Robert H. Sheldon 

**Wire Inspector 

Richard R. Catanzaro, Sr. 

**Sealer of Weights and Measures 

Robert D. Rose 

**Veterans Agent 
Carl F. Saunders 



*Elected **Appointed 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



Wakefield Voters Elect: 

Board of Selectmen Board of Library Trustees 

Town Clerk Town Planning Board 

Moderator Municipal Gas & Light Commissioners 

Tax Collector School Committee 

Town Treasurer Wakefield Housing Authority 

Board of Assessors Constables 

Board of Health Northeast Metropolitan Regional 

Vocational School Representative 

Board of Selectmen Appoints: 

Town Administrator Commission on Disability Issues 

Town Counsel Election Officers 

Historical Commission Wakefield Cultural Council 

Council on Aging Conservation Commission 

Board of Appeals Recreation Commission 

Boardof Registrars Cable TV Advisory Committee 

Advisory Board of Public Works Capital Planning Committee 

Fence Viewers Various Special Committees 
Sweetser Lecture Advisory Committee 

Town Administrator Appoints: 

Town Accountant Town Planner 

Fire Chief Police Chief 

Inspector of Buildings Plumbing/Gas Inspector 

Wire Inspector Director of Civil Defense 

Parking Clerk Dog Officer/Animal Inspector 

Veterans Service Agent Sealer of Weights & Measures 

The Moderator and Chairman of 
Board of Selectmen & Chairman 
of Finance Committee Appoints: 

Finance Committee 
Various Special Committees 



10 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



HOW ITS DONE IN WAKEFIELD: 

• VOTER REGISTRATION 

• LOCAL ELECTIONS 

• TOWN MEETING 

Prepared by the Town Clerk and the League of Women Voters of Wakefield 

TO REGISTER TO VOTE IN WAKEFIELD YOU MUST BE: 

• an American citizen native-born or naturalized 

• at least 18 years old on the date of the election 

• a resident of Wakefield, Massachusetts 

WHEN AND WHERE TO REGISTER: 

• Monday through Wednesday, 8:00 am to 4:30 pm, Thursday 8:00 am to 
7:00 pm and Friday 8:00 am to 12:30 pm and during any extra hours 
scheduled by the Board of Registrars see local newspapers for times. 

• Town Clerk's office, first floor, William J. Lee Memorial Hall, One 
Lafayette Street, OR in any other city or town in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts (your registration will be forwarded to Wakefield Town 
Clerk for inclusion on local voting list). You may also request a mail-in 
registration form. 

DEADLINES FOR REGISTRATION: 

• To vote in state or presidential primaries or state elections, you must 
register to vote at least 20 days before the election. 

• To vote in local elections, or to vote at Annual Town Meeting, you must 
register to vote at least 20 days prior to the election. 

• To vote at a Special Town Meeting, you must register at least 10 days 
prior to the meeting. 

MORE ABOUT REGISTRATION 

Registration is permanent unless a voter moves to a new city or town. 
However, failure to respond to the Annual Census may result in being 
dropped from the active list of Registered Voters. A voter, moving from 
one precinct to another within the town, should immediately notify the 
Registrars of the changes to assure being able to vote in the new 
precinct, Otherwise he must vote in his former address. 

Registrations are administered by the Board of Registrars. The Board is 
composed of three citizens, appointed for three year terms by the Board of 
Selectmen, and the Town Clerk, who by virtue of her office, serves as clerk 
of the board. 

POLLING PLACES 

1. Precinct 1 — Masonic Building 

2. Precinct 2 — Crystal Community Club 

3. Precinct 3 — Crystal Community Club 

4. Precinct 4 — Most Blessed Sacrament Church Hall 

5. Precinct 5 - West Side Social Club 

6. Precinct 6 - West Side Social Club 

7. Precinct 7 — Masonic Building 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 11 



LOCAL ELECTIONS 

Local elections are held annually on the fourth Tuesday in April and are 
non-partisan. Write-ins are permitted, and absentee voting is allowed. 

TO BECOME A CANDIDATE FOR LOCAL OFFICE, A CITIZEN MUST: 

• be a registered voter in Wakefield, Massachusetts. 

• obtain nomination papers from the Town Clerk (one set of papers for 
each office sought in the election). 

• obtain the signatures of 50 citizens who are registered to vote in Wakefield. 

• submit nomination papers to the Board of Registrars 49 days prior to 
the town election for certification of the signatures. 

• file nomination papers with the Town Clerk by 5 pm on the 35th day 
before the town election. This places the candidate's name officially on 
the ballot. 

TO JOIN A POLITICAL PARTY 

A citizen may choose to declare his/her choice of political affiliation when 
he/she registers to vote, or may declare his/her party choice when voting in 
primary elections. If a voter chooses not to declare his/her party, he/she will 
be listed as an "unenrolled voter" on voting lists. 

TO CHANGE OR CANCEL PARTY ENROLLMENT/SERVE AS A DELEGATE 

A voter may appear in person at the Town Clerk's office or use the postal 
system to change his/her party designation. This may be done at any time. 

A party member is eligible to be a delegate to his/her party conventions; 
delegates are chosen every four years on the presidential primary ballot. 

PROCEDURE AT TOWN MEETING IS SET FORTH IN THE TOWN 
CHARTER 

THE TOWN MEETING WARRANT 

The Town Meeting Warrant is a collection of articles presented by depart- 
ments, committees and voters for consideration at an Annual or Special 
Town Meeting. The warrant is composed by the Selectmen, with articles 
being entered by request or petition. Individual voters may have an article 
inserted by petition. The selectmen receive all petitions for the warrant. 
Signatures of ten or more registered voters are required on articles for 
annual town meetings; 100 signatures are required for articles filed by citi- 
zens in warrants for special town meetings. Signatures on petitions must 
be substantially as the voters' names appear on the voting list. Voters may 
request the advise of the Town Counsel in drawing up an article. Custom- 
arily, public announcement is made of the opening and the closing dates of 
the warrant. Citizens, however, may take their petitions to the Selectmen 
at any Board meeting during the year and the Selectmen will hold such 
articles for insertion in the warrant for the next town meeting. Department 
heads enter their articles by the process of request. 

THE ANNUAL REPORT 

The Annual Report is comprised of reports from all Town departments, 
including operating expenses and statistical information. The Annual 
Report is compiled by the Selectmen's office, and copies are available free 
prior to the Annual Town Meeting. 



General 
Government 



Reports of 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

ASSESSING DEPARTMENT 

PLANNING BOARD 

CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION 

CONTRIBUTORY 
RETIREMENT BOARD 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

PERMANENT BUILDING 
COMMITTEE 



14 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the 
Board of Selectmen 

At the Board of Selectmen's organizational meeting on May 11, 
2009, following the Town Election in April, Sel. John F. Carney was 
elected Chairman and Sel. Albert J. Turco was elected Vice Chairman. 
The other members of the Board are Patrick S. Glynn, James E. Good, 
John B. Encarnacao, Betsy Sheeran and newly elected Sel. Paul R. 
DiNocco. 

The powers, duties and responsibilities of the Board of Selectmen 
are broadly diversified in hundreds of sections of law applying directly to 
Selectmen. The broadly diversified powers, duties and responsibilities of 
the Board of Selectmen affect the functioning of all Town departments 
and central coordination is essential to an effective and efficient munici- 
pal administration. 

The Town continues to function under the Open Town Meeting- 
Board of Selectmen-Town Administrator Charter. The Charter gives the 
Town Administrator the responsibility for daily management of the 
Town's business; provides for the election by the voters of a seven mem- 
ber Board of Selectmen, a Town Moderator, a seven member School com- 
mittee, a five member Planning Board and a Housing Authority; pro- 
vides for strengthened financial procedures; created a Department of 
Public Works with an Advisory Board of Public Works; provides flexibili- 
ty to reorganize Town agencies in the future; and, provides a referendum 
procedure by which Town Meeting votes on certain Warrant Articles 
may be reconsidered by the voters in a referendum election. 

The Board of Selectmen and the Town Administrator have contin- 
ued to represent the Town's interest before governmental officials, com- 
mittees and commissions at the various levels of government for the pur- 
pose of presenting information and evidence on matters that concern the 
Town of Wakefield. 

The necessity for effective liaison and representation between the 
Town and State government has become increasingly important as local- 
ly uncontrollable costs are transferred and made part of the cost of Town 
government. 

Selectman Albert Turco serves as the Town's representative to the 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council with Selectman Betsy Sheeran as 
the Alternate Member. The Town's active participation is necessary to 
the Town's effective representation in an area of activity that involves 
significant dollar cost as well as a progressively increasing socio-econom- 
ic impact. 

The Board of Selectmen wishes to thank the many volunteers who 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 15 



work so attentively on a variety of Board, Committees and Commissions 
to make Wakefield the Town that it is. 



John F. Carney, Chairman 

Albert J. Turco, Vice Chairman 

Paul R. DiNocco 

John B. Encarnacao 

Patrick J. Glynn 

James E. Good 

Betsy Sheeran 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Stephen P. Maio 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

Trudi Murphy 

CLERK 



Report of the 
Town Administrator 

During 2009, the Board of Selectmen continued to promote efforts 
aimed at providing the best possible services to the Citizens of Wakefield 
within the parameters of the budget granted by town meeting. The Board 
continued to promote efficiencies in every area of town government and 
work diligently to expand and improve our commercial base, while mak- 
ing Wakefield a Destination Place for our own Citizens as well as visitors. 

With the support of the Boards of Selectmen and Health and the 
hard work of the Charter Review Committee, the Town of Wakefield and 
City of Melrose combined Health Services This new venture which has 
received accolades state-wide has not only increased public health ser- 
vices ten fold but has greatly lessened the burden on the local tax levy, by 
collecting appropriate fees for health related services. We have also 
entered into a study funded by the Middlesex County Sheriffs depart- 
ment to determine if we can save money on emergency dispatch by collab- 
orating with our neighboring towns of Reading, Stoneham and Melrose. 

Our search for collaboration and efficiency is not limited to outside of 
the confines of Wakefield however, the town side Internet Technology 
department and the School side department are joining forces in order to 
better service the community at a more efficient level. 

Perhaps the biggest story of 2009 is the outpouring of support and 
volunteerism from the Citizens of Wakefield. In response to the commu- 
nity's desire to provide solutions to the challenges we face, the Board of 



16 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Selectmen has established a number of Citizen Committees. The Finan- 
cial Review Committee consists of a very dedicated group of Citizens who 
will compare the method, manner and cost of how we provide vital ser- 
vices with similar communities. It is hoped that we will learn some bet- 
ter practices and efficiencies from what will be a very detailed study. 

The newly created Events Planning Committee will concentrate on 
promoting Wakefield as a great place to work, play and do business as 
they facilitate community events throughout the town. 

The Economic Development Committee has not only completed a cit- 
izen survey as to how we can improve and market what Wakefield has to 
offer, but has also concentrated on creating a consistent public brand for 
Wakefield. 

These are exciting times as we continue to make Wakefield the best 
it can possibly be. I wish to thank all of the town employees, citizens and 
especially the Board of Selectmen for their support this past year. 

Stephen P. Maio 
Town Administrator 

Assessing Department 

MISSION STATEMENT 
The mission of the Wakefield Assessment Department is to provide 
fiscal stability by promptly, fairly and equitably determining the valua- 
tion of all real and personal property located in the Town of Wakefield. 
The Assessment Department is obligated under law to assess all proper- 
ty at its full and fair market value as of January 1 of each year for the 
purpose of taxation. This is accomplished through the maintenance and 
administration of all property tax data records. In addition, the depart- 
ment also administers motor vehicle excise tax, real, personal and motor 
vehicle excise tax abatements, and all statutory tax exemptions as 



Board of Assessors: 


Office Staff: 


Sebastian P. Tine, MAA 


Victor P. Santaniello, MAA, Dir. of 
Assessments 


Jane D'Addario 


J. Kenneth Muse, MAA, Assistant 
Assessor 


Paul Faler, Chairman 


1 Clerk 



allowed by law. 

Our staff is comprised of an elected three-person board and four full- 
time employees. 

During the past year, the major activities undertaken by the Asses- 
sors office include: 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



17 



Provided online access to our property record database via the 
internet. 

Conducted a state mandated interim revaluation of all proper- 
ties. 

Reviewed and adjusted properties to reflect updated market con- 
ditions. 

Completed a revaluation of all personal property accounts and 
canvassed town for new accounts. 

Maintained and updated all real estate and personal property 
tax records. 
Special projects and future goals of the Assessment Department 
include: 

Manage ongoing state-mandated data recollection effort. 
Continue review and update of valuation neighborhood designa- 
tions. 

Continue ongoing sales verification questionnaire mailing pro- 
gram. 

Implement new and efficient office policies and procedures as 
required. 

Maintain supplemental assessment program as required by 
state law. 

Update existing tax maps. 

Make select state tax forms available via the internet. 
Increase public awareness relative to assessing and exemptions. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Board of Assessors 



FISCAL YEAR 2010 TAX RATE SUMMARY 


Total amount to be raised 


$74,897,302.33 


Total estimated receipts 


$27,376,248 


Residential Tax Rate: $10.88 


Commercial Tax Rate: $21.97 


Real Property Valuation 


$3,740,329,367 


Personal Property Valuation 


$44,752,783 


Total valuation of taxable 
property 


$3,785,082,150 


Total real estate tax 


$46,537,835.69 


Total personal property tax 


$983,218.64 


Tax levy 


$47,521,054.33 



18 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



FISCAL YEAR 2010 RECAP SUMMARY PAGE 1 


Property 
Class 


Levy 
Percentage 


Valuation by 
Class 


Tax 
Rates 


Levy by 
Class 


Residential 


73.5713% 


$3,213,453,608 


10.88 


$34,962,375.26 


Exempt 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Open Space 


0.0000% 









Commercial 


20.1086% 


$434,929,359 


21.97 


$9,555,398.02 


Exempt 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Industrial 


4.2511% 


$91,946,400 


21.97 


$2,020,062.41 


SUBTOTAL 


97.9310% 


$3,740,329,367 


- 


$46,537,835.69 


Personal 


2.0690% 


$44,752,783 


21.97 


$983,218.64 


TOTAL 


100.0000% 


$3,785,082,150 


- 


$47,521,054.33 



MINIMUM RESIDE 


YTIAL FACTOR COMPUTATION (FY2010) 


Class 


Full and Fair Cash 
Value 


Percentage Share 


L Residential 


$3,213,453,608 


84.8979% 


2. Open Space 





0.0000% 


3. Commercial 


$434,929,359 


11.4906% 


4. Industrial 


$91,946,400 


2.4292% 


5. Personal Property 


$44,752,783 


1.1823% 


TOTALS 


$3,785,082,150 


100.0000% 


Maximum Share of 
Levy CIP Classes 
3,4&5 


1.75 x 15.1021 = 


26.4287% 
Maximum % Share 


Minimum Share of 
Levy for Classes 1 & 

2 


100% -26.4287% = 


73.5713% 
Minimum % Share 


Minimum Residential 
Factor (MRF) 


.735713/. 848979 = 


.866585 



ASSESSMENT/CLASSIFICATION REPORT- FY2009 


Property 
Type 


Pare 
el 

Cou 
nt 


Class 1 

Residential 

Value 


Class 3 
Commerci 
al 
Value 


Class 4 

Industrial 

Value 


Class 5 
Personal 
Prop. 
Value 


101 


6,19 
6 


$2,452,540, 
200 








102 


1,07 

7 


$283,947,90 









Misc.103, 
109 


1 


$500,200 








104 


730 


$291,866,90 









105 


134 


$58,004,600 








111 - 125 


91 


$83,468,500 









198th ANNUAL REPORT 



19 



130- 
132,106 


299 


$20,523,000 








300 - 393 


319 




$415,935, 
300 






400 - 452 


96 






$91,383,6 
00 




Ch.61 
Land 














Ch.61 A 
Land 














Ch.61B 
Land 


3 




$486,467 






012-043 


80 


$22,602,308 


$18,507,5 
92 


$562,800 




501 


213 








$2,454,00 

3 


502 


311 








$22,005,7 
36 


503 











$0 


504,550- 

552 


4 








$4,506,72 



505 


3 








$14,056,3 
00 


508 


6 








$1,730,02 
4 


TOTALS 


9,56 

3 


$3,213,453, 
608 


$434,929, 
359 


$91,946,4 
00 


$44,752,7 
83 


REAL & PERSON 
VALUE 


AL PROPER! 


rY TOTAL 


$3,785,082,150 


TOTAL VALUE OF ALL EXEMPT 
PROPERTY 


$334,075,500 



LOCAL EXPENDITURES 


Total appropriations 


$71,505,996 


Other Local Expenditures 


$1,000,000 


Snow and ice deficit 


$629,764.12 


Allowance for abatements and 
exemptions 


$443,207.21 


Total state and county charges 


$1,277,300 


Total cherry sheet offsets 


$41,035.00 


Total of appropriations and 
expenditures 


$74,897,302.33 



20 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS AND AVAILABLE FUNDS 


State cherry sheet estimates 


$8,243,752 


Ma school bldg. auth 


$987,851 


Local estimated receipts 


$5,100,205 


Enterprise funds 


$11,541,577 


Free cash 


$199,494 


Other available funds 


$89,433 


Offset receipts 


$85,000 


Total: 


$27,376,248 



STATUTORY EXEMPTIONS 


Clause 


FY 2008 


FY 2009 


Hardship 5- 18 


$0 


$0.00 


Deferral 5 -41 A 


$24,930.73 


$27,409.31 


Elderly 5- 41 C 


$33,000 


$60,750 


Veterans & Surviving Spouses 
5 - 22(a-f) 


$89,900 


$68,400 


Surviving Spouses 1 7D 


$3,850 


$1,500 


8-58 


$0.00 


$0.00 


Blind 5 - 37 


$11,500 


$11,000 



BETTERMENTS, SPECIAL ASSESSMENTS & LIENS 


Category 


Total Committed Amounts by Category 


Light Liens 


$82,767.40 


Sewer Liens 


$361,114.48 


Water Liens 


$214,987.33 


Title V Sewer Upgrade 


$8,834.05 


Sewer Betterments 


$9,498.69 


Street & Sidewalk 
Betterments 


$14,700.94 


Water Betterments 


$0.00 


Total Committed 


$691,902.89 


Motor Vehicle Excise 
(Comm. 1-5 2009) 


24,840 Bills 




$2,911,916.01 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 21 



Report of the 
Planning Board 



The Planning Board, as established under M.G.L. Chapter 41, §81A, 
consists of an elected five 5-member body whose powers and duties are 
to carry out the provisions of the subdivision control laws in the Town of 
Wakefield. The Planning Board may also, in certain cases, act as the spe- 
cial permit granting authority as defined in the Town's bylaws. An 
appointed Associate Member to the Planning Board can be called upon 
when hearing special permit applications. The Planning Board is respon- 
sible for the preparing, adopting and issuing a Master Plan. The Board is 
also charged with making an annual report to Town meeting. The Plan- 
ning Board normally holds regularly scheduled meetings and public 
hearings on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month. 

In 2009, the Planning Board met seventeen 17 times and continued 
the public hearing into 2010 on one new subdivision. In January 2009, 
the Planning Board accepted a surety agreement for Montrose School 
Lane, a ten-lot subdivision on the site of the former Montrose School. The 
public hearing began on June 10, 2008 and concluded on July 8, 2008. 
Approval was subsequently granted for Montrose School Lane; the plans 
were endorsed on July 31, 2008. As of December 2009, six new homes 
have been sold in this subdivision. 

In preparation for the April 2009 Town Meeting, the Wakefield 
Board of Selectmen referred a text amendment and four sites abutting 
Route 128 to the Planning Board for a recommendation that would allow 
billboards. After a public hearing on March 10, 2009, the Planning 
Board voted to support the Selectmen's proposal. Subsequently, at Town 
Meeting the text amendment was defeated and the map amendments 
were withdrawn. Another rezoning was proposed for the rear portion of 
lots fronting on Salem Street, between the eastbound on-ramp to 128 and 
Pleasure Island Road. The owner sought Business zoning for a restau- 
rant on the site. The Planning Board recommended for the zoning 
change to Business, but subsequent Town Meeting voted to deny the 
request. 

The Planning Board issued a request for proposals for the zoning 
map on May 8, 2007 and interviewed three firms on July 17, 2007. The 
Planning Board selected the firm of Applied Geographies, and after 11/2 
years completed a review all the town reports and compiled a zoning 
map tracking all map amendments from 1953 to date. Four updated 
zoning maps were submitted to the April 2009 Town Meeting for adop- 
tion. Town Meeting adopted the text amendment, corrections to the map 
and four final zoning maps to culminate the effort to correct and update 



22 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



the zoning map. 

A new six-lot subdivision was submitted by Symes Development for 
a 2.12-acre site on Preston Street in a General Residence Zone. The 
developer proposed five duplex buildings, totaling ten units, on a new 
cul-de-sc street, to be known as Blue Jay Circle. On the portion of the 
site that fronted Blossom Street, an additional duplex building would be 
constructed. The public hearing began on September 22, 2009 and the 
Planning Board met four times to review this project. It is anticipated 
that the public hearing will be closed January 12, 2010, and subsequent- 
ly, a decision will be filed with the Town Clerk in January 2010. 

The Planning Board created a steering committee to consider a new 
sign bylaw in 2007. A preliminary draft of the bylaw was completed on 
October 23, 2007. After of several years of discussion, development and 
revision by the Town Planner, the Board of Selectmen referred a new 
Sign Bylaw Overlay District bylaw for the downtown the to the Planning 
Board for public hearing on October 27, 2009. Discussions of the bylaw 
are to continue until the final draft is considered at the April 2010 Town 
Meeting. 

Another zoning text amendment was referred to the Planning Board 
regarding §190-32 G that allows a special permit to convert single-family 
homes into duplex and multiple units. The Selectmen's proposal would 
allow conversions exclusively with the existing dwelling's footprint and 
volume. The public hearing on this bylaw change began on December 
15, 2009 with final consideration expected at the April 2010 Town Meet- 
ing. 

Under M.G.L. ch. 41, §81P, the Planning Board is required to 
endorse plans for new lots that comply with the town's zoning bylaw. 
Theses plans are known as 8 IP plans or approval not required ANR 
plans. In 2009, the Planning Board endorsed three ANR plans. 

The Planning Board would like to acknowledge the following indi- 
viduals for their support and assistance throughout the past year: 
Michael Collins, Town Engineer; Linda Donaldson, Clerk to the Board; 
Thomas Mullen, Town Counsel and Paul Reavis, Town Planner. The 
Planning Board especially acknowledges the service and guidance of 
Paul R. DiNocco, a former Chairman who was elected to the Planning 
Board in April 2000, served on the Planning Board for nine years and 
subsequently was elected a Selectman April 2009. Our thanks go out to 
all those who have assisted this Board throughout the year. 



Respectfully submitted, 

Paul Semenza, Chairman 

James Terrence French, Vice Chairman 

Fred Emilianowicz Jr. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 23 



Matthew Lowry 

William D'Amore 

Kay M. Johnston, Associate Member 



Report of the 
Conservation Commission 

The Wakefield Conservation Commission is responsible for the pro- 
tection and preservation of Wakefield's natural resources through regu- 
latory review, planning, advocacy, and education. Typically, this is 
accomplished through the implementation of the Conservation Commis- 
sion Act M.G.L. Ch. 40, sec. 8C, and the administration and enforce- 
ment of the Massachusetts Wetlands Protection Act ("Act") (M.G.L c 131 
§ 40), with its corresponding regulations (310 CMR 10.00). The only 
changes to the Act this year were provisions for necessary actions to 
eradicate the Asian Longhorn Beetle infestations within the parameters 
of the Wetlands Protection Act. 

In 2009, the Conservation Commission reviewed ten 10 Notice of 
Intent filings, three 3 Abbreviated Notice of Resource Area Delineation 
filings, and issued four 4 Enforcement Orders. The regulatory review of 
these filings included an assessment of potential impacts on the wetland 
values vital to the community, including the protection of public and/or 
private water supplies, protection of groundwater, flood control, storm 
damage prevention, pollution prevention, and protection of wildlife habi- 
tat. 

Although not often realized, the original mandate of the Commission 
was the preservation and management of open space and recreational 
opportunities. Therefore, the Commission is also responsible for the plan- 
ning, acquiring, and managing of open space in Wakefield. This year the 
Commission worked with two private land owners to expand the protec- 
tion of wetland resources and to expand potential open space opportuni- 
ties. The Commission is hoping to acquire approximately eight 8 acres 
of land to add to the Town's open space. In addition, the Commission is 
working closely with another private land owner to implement a conser- 
vation restriction. Conservation restrictions are interests in land 
acquired through gift, purchase, or regulatory exaction which are 
designed to preserve natural resources from adverse future change. 

This year, the Commission was extremely fortunate to be 
approached by a local Eagle Scout candidate requesting an opportunity 
to coordinate with the Commission to complete his service project. 
Michael Santiago Jr. coordinated a large scale volunteer project to 



24 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



improve access to a trail system in Reedy Meadow. He accomplished this 
through clearing of overgrown brush, removing debris & trash, posting 
trail markers, and replacing a wooden trail head sign. The volunteers, 
who included high school students, teachers, and other community mem- 
bers, logged approximately 300 hours of volunteer time to complete the 
project. 



Report of the 
Contributory Retirement Board 

SUMMARY OF ACTIVITY 
FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 2009 

INVESTMENT SCHEDULE 

PRIT Cash Fund $56.44 

PRIT Capital Fund $77,639,257.34 

Cash-Checking Account $148,605.51 

Accounts Receivable $14,828.26 

Accounts Payable $675.45 

Total $77,802,072.10 

PENSION AND ANNUITY PAYMENTS 

Pension Accumulation Fund $6,649,439.19 

Annuity Reserve Fund $1.106.666.39 

Total Payments $7,756,105.58 

NUMBER OF RETIREES AND BENEFICIARIES BY TYPE 

Superannuation 258 

Accidental Disability 39 

Ordinary Disability 7 

Accidental Death 9 

Surviving Spouses 42 

Total 355 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 25 



Report of the 
Recreation Commission 

We are pleased to report that 2009 was a very successful year for the 
Recreation Department. Several summer programs were expanded as 
well as many new programs added. Sean Timmons was re-appointed for 
his sixth year as Director of the Recreation Commission. 

The Recreation Department is supported solely by the fees charged 
for the summer programs. The office is also the central permitting 
department for the use of all outside sports fields and tennis courts. 
Funds raised by the field permit fees are made available to the Depart- 
ment of Public Works for field improvements as needed. The department 
will continue to work closely with the many sports groups in town to pro- 
vide safe and affordable playing fields. 

The Recreation Department's most important goal is to expand and 
improve the recreational opportunities for Wakefield citizens of all ages. 

Christine Gargano, Chairperson 

Susan Hickey 

Daniel Crowley 

Cy Bode 

Jeanne Stinson 

Richard Stevens 

Joseph Tringale 

Anthony Longo 

Christine Sacco, Clerk 

Sean Timmons, Director 



Report of the 
Permanent Building Committee 

The Permanent Building Committee met 14 times in calendar year 
2009, from February 4, 2009 to December 17, 2009. 

During 2009, the Permanent Building Committee obtained an occu- 
pancy permit for the Center for Performing Arts with a limit of 59 occu- 
pants due to the age and condition of the air handling equipment and the 
current building code. A Reserve Fund transfer of $40,000.00 was used 
to complete a punch list of work items needed to comply with safety 



26 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



requirements of the building code. This scope of work included 
handrails, flooring, ceiling work and signage. 

In 2009, through the help of the Northeast Regional Vocational School 
and its faculty members, Theodore Nickole, Principal and Vocational 
Coordinator; Steve Barry, Carpentry Instructor; Dave McDonald, Plumb- 
ing Instructor; and Mike Zolatas, Electrical Instructor, the Permanent 
Building Committee was able to substantially complete the renovation of 
The Little Red Schoolhouse to be used as the Wakefield Historical Soci- 
ety Museum. This was accomplished through a donation from Shaw's 
Super Market in the amount of $100,000.00 plus interest of $1,707.97 to 
the Town of Wakefield. The Vocational School students did the rough 
carpentry, electrical wiring and installation of a new electric service, 
construction of new bathrooms on the first floor and the installation of 
new blue board walls. 

The Permanent Building Committee updated the sprinkler system, 
fire alarm and security system. Finish carpentry work, finish electrical 
work and interior painting of the building were completed by private con- 
tractors. All contracts were bid in accordance with the State Law. The 
largest contract for the Little Red Schoolhouse was for the HVAC units 
that were installed on the second floor. There were two units; one for 
each floor of the building providing both heat and air conditioning. 
There remains an unencumbered balance at the end of 2009 in the 
amount of $10,408.53 from the original $101,707.97 gift. The bills 
remaining to be paid include a bill for finished carpentry and a bill from 
Wayne Alarm for the upgrade of the security and fire alarm system. 
Through the dedicated hard work of each member of the Permanent 
Building Committee, with the assistance of the Northeast Vocational 
School, the various contractors, Wakefield Municipal Light Department 
and Wakefield Department of Public Works, the Museum for the Wake- 
field Historical Society will be open in the Spring of 2010. 



Respectfully submitted, 

John B. Encarnacao, Chairman 

Permanent Building Committee 



Members: 

Joseph B. Bertrand, Secretary 

Philip C. Croscup 

Michael Giannttasio 

Richard P. Hudson 

Charles R. Kanouff 

James A. Lapery 

Thomas P. Mackay 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 27 



Kevin W. Ryder 

School Department Representatives: 

Lisa Butler - School Committee 

Joan Landers - Superintendent of Schools 

Dr. Kimberly Smith - High School Principal 

Advisory Members: 

Timothy Healy - DPW Building Manager 
Peter Evangelista - Supervisor, School Buildings & Grounds 
Thomas Mullin - Town Counsel - Legal Consultant 



Protection of 

Persons and 

Property 

Reports of 

CHIEF OF POLICE 

PARKING CLERK 

CHIEF OF THE 
FIRE DEPARTMENT 

FIRE ALARM & TRAFFIC SIGNAL 
EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT 

DIRECTOR 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT 

Building Inspector 

Gas Inspector 

Wire Inspector 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

ANIMAL CONTROI/ANIMAL INSPECTOR 



30 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the Chief of Police 

www.wakefieldpd.org 

The year 2009 was a year of radical change for the men and women 
of the Wakefield Police Department. Our mission, although unchanged, 
became more difficult than in past years with many devastating budget 
cuts from the outside that resulted in major staffing shortfalls midyear. 
In the end, we continued to move the department forward by providing 
the best police services possible while operating under tough economic 
times. 

January was a very busy month, especially for our narcotics divi- 
sion. Our staff has been working with outside agencies to try to stem the 
tide of the drug flow and limit the amount of violations occurring. The 
drug of choice, opiates, are becoming more prevalent. K9 Leo has proven 
to be a great asset to us with his response to many of our officer's calls 
for K9 support. 

During the month of February, officers made a number of alcohol 
related arrests. One was very newsworthy when Officer Leary stopped a 
motor vehicle and after making observations, arrested a party for his 3rd 
offence of operating under the influence. Our narcotics officers were very 
busy this month conducting a number of undercover narcotics cases. 
One such arrest resulted in the seizure of two motor vehicles. These 
vehicles will remain in the custody of the Police Department until adjudi- 
cated by the court. In an interesting twist, officers received information 
from a confidential informant that a defendant previously arrested for 
trafficking in narcotics was planning to leave the country. Based on the 
information received, officers secured arrest warrants and arrested the 
party as he was leaving his house with the intention of passing through 
Logan Airport to catch a flight to Guatemala. Once in custody, he was 
transported to the court where he was held on $1 million surety. Officers 
were also able to arrest a local couple for distribution of Class B 
methadone in a school zone. I would also like to commend Officer Ken 
Silva has spearheaded an effort amongst other officers to both locate and 
take into custody members of the community who are wanted by the 
court system for a variety of criminal issues, helping to ensure that our 
neighborhoods remain safe. 

We began a new enforcement program in March whereby officers are 
performing directed traffic patrols to certain targeted areas of high inci- 
dents. This program, conceived by Lieut Calabrese, will hopefully reduce 
the incidents of drunk driving while at the same time making our streets 
safer. Officer Matthew Warren is one of several officers who have helped 
us to maintain a high level of consistency in our traffic enforcement 
efforts. Officers also responded to a horrific fatal motor vehicle accident 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 31 



whereby the victim was ejected from the vehicle on Rte 95 and landed on 
the pavement below on the Rte 129 rotary near exit 40. Sgt Skory con- 
tinues to do an exceptional job as our Traffic Supervisor, helping to 
maintain a high level of both safety and efficiency on our roadways. 

As the good weather of early spring arrived, we began to ramp up 
some community based programs. Officers Leary and O'Connell were 
assigned to the Schools to assist in the "Second Step" program, a preven- 
tion program run by the School Department. This reassignment was 
only possible through a School Safety Grant written by the Police 
Department with the help of the School Department. 

May began with a terrible motor vehicle accident in the parking lot 
of the North East Regional Vocational School parking lot which resulted 
in the death of a 19 year old resident. As a result of that death and the 
exposure to the stressors of responding to these types of accidents, we 
mandated that all officers involved participate in a stress management 
program. Additionally, we activated the NEMLEC STARS project which 
brought counselors and guidance to the students and staff at the voca- 
tional school that witnessed or felt the effects of the accident. These 
types of events are very difficult for first responders. Thankfully, 
through regional planning and cooperative agreements, we are able to 
access these valuable resources. 

June brought the first real fiscal hit to the Police Department. Gov- 
ernor Patrick, with the support of the Legislature, drastically reduced 
the Police Career Incentive Program Quinn Bill. As a result of that 
action, three officers retired for fear of losing part of their pension. At 
the same time the Legislature, again with the approval of the Governor 
passed sweeping changes to the pension laws. Although they did not 
immediately impact the pensions of our officers, these officers left for 
fear of the unknown and with the intent to take care of their families. 
This loss brought the total number of officer reductions to seven from the 
43 officers we had this time last year. With one swipe of the pen on Bea- 
con Hill, we lost over a hundred years of experience with little hope of 
finding training in the future to replace these officers. 

The summer months were busy and demanding for the officers since 
we were operating at a 19% force reduction and the fact that our calls for 
service rose about 9%. Much of this rise was due to the economy and the 
many calls for services that our constituents requested. Motorcycle noise 
was an issue in some neighborhoods and as a result the department pur- 
chased, through a grant, a decibel meter. Officers, under the leadership 
of Lieut Calabrese and Sgt Haggerty will be trained on proper usage of 
the meter as well as noise abatement practices. 

The only homicide investigated during 2009 was with the discovery 
of a body of a Hispanic male on Audubon Rd. Investigation revealed that 



32 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



the male was a former resident of the Guatemalan community in 
Everett. Due to a language barrier presented, Officer Mike Taylor, who 
speaks and understands Spanish was called in to assist. Additionally, a 
new transferee from the Revere Police Department was pressed into ser- 
vice to help and serve as a liaison between the Wakefield Police and 
Spanish speaking family members and potential witnesses. To date the 
homicide has not been solved, but we continue to investigate as informa- 
tion surfaces. 

During the early fall we continued with our training regimens. We 
held an interactive training session at the Public Safety Building with 
members of the Police, Fire, Schools, DPW and Light Dept relating to the 
new emergency cell phone system we collectively purchased. These tele- 
phones, housed and maintained at the Wakefield Police Station, are and 
can be used in emergency situations as well as at events whereby inter- 
departmental communication is required or needed. 

The Department also began using performance appraisals for new 
personnel. This program has provided the necessary insight to the work 
habits and skills of our new employees. I am grateful to both of our 
Unions for working in concert with management to make this program 
work. 

The fall months also brought about some lobbying on behalf of our 
staff. I was asked to represent the Wakefield Police in testimony outlin- 
ing the devastating effects on staffing levels as a result of pension reform 
and Quinn Bill reduction. Optimistically speaking, I am hopeful that the 
Legislature will heed the warning of the staff reductions that we all suf- 
fered due to the above mentioned legislative changes. 
We closed the year out on a positive note. Sgt Skory and Officer McCaul 
completed their critical incident management training and began to 
share their lessons with the command staff outlining what to watch for 
in our officers' lives that could be causing stress and diminished work 
performance. This was a final wrap up of the program started earlier in 
the year to reduce post traumatic stressors. 

Finally, the electronic finger print scanner arrived and officers are 
now being trained in its use. This will be a valuable tool in helping locat- 
ing missing and/or wanted people who have interaction with us. 
Lastly, we are completing our redesigned website. Managed internally 
by Officer Maglio, and designed by Officer Maglio, Sgt Reboulet, Det. 
O'Connell and Officer Driscoll, I am sure that you will find a high quali- 
ty, professional and informative website. Feel free to view it at 
www.wakefieldpd.org. 

The request for police services for the year is outlined below: 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 33 



Calls for Service 9846 



Arrests 




Males 


232 


Female 


45 


Total 


277 


Arrests Adult/Juvenile 




Adult 


246 


Juvenile 


31 



Motor Vehicle Violations 1872 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 564 

Accidents w/Injury 78 

Accidents w/o Injury 486 

Fatal 4 

Parking Violations 1,788 

Parking Fines Paid 1,080 

Parking Fines Outstanding 708 

Car Seats Installed 74 

COMMUNITY POLICING 

Community policing is just not a name for a program in Wakefield, it is a 
way of life. In the early 1800's Sir Robert Peel, father of modern day 
policing stated that "the police are the people and the people are the 
police". In saying so, he defined what we do all day, every day. 
From a programmatic stand point, Community Policing funding was 
made available through a series of grants provided by the Executive 
Office of Public Safety. This past year, due to budget cuts at the state 
level, all community policing funds were eliminated. As a result, many 
of our "extra" programs had to be eliminated. The Rape Aggression 
Defense Program RAD was eliminated as well as our Halloween school 
safety program. Our Resource Officer at the Galvin Middle School was 
pulled back and placed into patrol thus putting the department in a reac- 
tionary mode to problem solving at the Middle School. Having an officer 
in the Galvin was an asset to the teachers, students and the Police 
Department. Our relationship with the Wakefield Alliance Against Vio- 
lence is still intact, although we made some adjustments to reduce over- 
time costs of the officer assigned. We have developed school evacuation 



34 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



plans for our schools and have updated our floor plans of each and every 
school in the district. The Middlesex District Attorney's Office and the 
Wakefield Police continue to meet with school officials on a monthly 
basis to ensure that our schools are safe and that those attending have 
the best opportunities for a solid education. Retired officer Al Sarafian 
works closely with the US Marine Corps Reserve in collecting toys for 
the Toys for Tots program in an effort to deliver toys for the holidays to 
those who are less fortunate. Officer Sarafian retired earlier this year 
but has offered to stay on as a volunteer to keep the program alive. He is 
also responsible for raising money for the Jimrrry Fund through the 
Chiefs of Police canister drive. Hats off to Officer Sarafian! 

INVESTIGATIONS 

During the year Wakefield Police Officers investigated a number of seri- 
ous crimes. The majority of those are outlined below. With the new per- 
sonnel in the Detective Bureau due to retirement and transfer, we have 
had a new direction. Much of the focus has been to try to reduce proper- 
ty crimes and a large part of time has been invested in trying to reduce 
the flow of drugs in town. Our Detective Division, under the leadership 
of Sgt Dinanno, is unsurpassed in both their dedication to the job and 
their determination in solving crime. 

Homicide 1 

Sex Offenses (All Categories) 20 

Robbery 5 

Burglary(Inclucles Breaking and Entering) 104 

Assaults 44 

Motor Vehicles Stolen 20 

Disturbances 899 

PERSONNEL 

The year 2009 the Department suffered the largest turnover of personnel 
in recent memory. Lieutenant Pherson, Sergeant Connor, Detective 
Moccia, and Patrol Officers Conway, Sarafian, Petrucci and Ramocki all 
retired before mid year. In a few short months, we lost hundreds of 
years of experience. At the same time we promoted Sergeant Craig Cal- 
abrese to Lieutenant and Patrol Officer Chris Lenners to Sergeant. Offi- 
cer Mike O'Connell was promoted into the Detective Bureau and Michael 
Taylor was trained as our backup Prosecutor. Additionally, we hired 
three officers; Josiah Curry, Andrew Dorney and Amy Toothaker as 
recruits and Officers Jorge Romero and Kelly Tobyne from the re-hire 
list. Officer Romero came to us from the Revere Police while Officer 
Tobyne joined our ranks from the Danvers Police Department. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 35 



TRAINING 

Most of our "in-service" mandated refresher training is now done in- 
house in an attempt to save money. Using the internet and through 
cooperative agreement with the Massachusetts Police Training Council, 
we are now able to reduce "offsite" training by fifty percent. At the same 
time, we implemented online training with our software vendor which 
allows us to eliminate expensive training at their Grafton facility thus 
saving time and fuel. This is a tremendous aid in reducing overtime 
costs. All of our officers continue to receive the best training we can pro- 
vide for them. Officers, as stated above, received training in post trau- 
matic stress reduction, child safety seat installation, narcotics recogni- 
tion and advanced management and leadership training. Additionally, 
officers are being trained in the use of electronic fingerprint technology 
and other new high tech items as they materialize. I would like to per- 
sonally thank Sgt. Chris Lenners for taking the lead on this project. Our 
certification process is moving forward with an eye on completing certifi- 
cation during 2010. Lieut. Calabrese and Sgt Reboulet have worked very 
hard on this endeavor. 

Each year I take a few moments to extol the virtues of the men and 
women who work for the Wakefield Police. This year is no different. 
Although the faces may change and the mission may be altered due to 
events around the world, the men and women of the Wakefield Police 
Department are proud of what they do and who they serve. Each day 
our people come to work and give it their best. They do the work twenty 
four hours per day, seven days a week. They are here to serve you, in the 
bright and sunny summer days and in the bitterly cold and snowy winter 
nights. It is an honor to have the opportunity to work with these fine 
police officers and each and every resident of Wakefield should know 
that their tax dollars are well spent on these quality officers. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Richard E. Smith 

Chief of Police 

WAKEFIELD POLICE ANNUAL REPORT 
FUNDS RETURNED TO THE TOWN 

Police Career Incentive Program $194,686. 10 

Paid Detail 10% Surcharge $19,533.39 

Firearms Licensing $2,375.00 

Accident/Incident Report Fees $3,499.18 

Alarm Receipts $3,520.89 

Solicitor Permit Fees $675.00 

Parking Enforcement Fines Collected $48,567.40 

Total $272,856.96 



36 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the Parking Clerk 

2009 



1. Tickets Issued 






1788 


2. Tickets Paid 






1080 


3. Tickets Unpaid 






709 


4. Surcharge Fees Collected 




$ 2,563.20 


Leased Vehicles 








5. Fines Collected 






$55,185.45 


Parking Tickets 








6. Fines Collected 






$125.00 


Handicap Parking 






7. Fines Recovered 






$180.00 


Court Action 








TOTAL 






$57,928.65 




Respectfully submitted, 




Michael J. 


Nasella 




Parking Clerk 





Report of the Chief 
of the Fire Department 

I am pleased to present the Annual Report of the Wakefield Fire 
Department for calendar year 2009. The fire department budget has 
essentially been level funded for several years, despite the cost of fuel, 
equipment repairs and in general, the cost of doing business increasing 
constantly. The department has been relying on grants and private dona- 
tions to continue to operate on a day-to-day basis. The elimination of the 
position of Fire Prevention Officer seventeen months ago has affected the 
speed and efficiency in which inspectional and enforcement services have 
been delivered by the Wakefield Fire Department. The department has 
reduced its overall number of in-service inspections by more than 500. 
This lack of a Fire Prevention Officer's position is further aggravated by 
the fact that Massachusetts continues to pass new or revised fire code 
regulations that impose increased enforcement authority on local fire 
departments. 

The Wakefield Fire Department received significant financial aid in 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 37 



the form of numerous state and federal grants during the year 2009. 
The largest of these grants was a federal Assistance to Firefighter Grant 
AFG for the Staffing for Adequate Fire and Emergency Response 
SAFER Grant. This grant subsidizes on a graduated five year plan the 
addition of four full-time firefighters for fire suppression duty. The addi- 
tion of these four positions raises the number of firefighters on duty to a 
level of twelve, something that the Wakefield Fire Department has not 
experienced in many years. This grant gradually increases the local con- 
tribution for payment of these positions until by the fifth and final year 
the Town accepts full fiscal responsibility for them. An additional AFG 
grant paid for 90% of the cost of new firefighting gear for 46 of the 
department's uniformed members. An additional state fire equipment 
grant helped fund new gear for the four SAFER firefighters mentioned 
above. This federal and state assistance has become essential to the 
operation of the department as it continues to seek funding for the regu- 
lar replacement of equipment that has approached the end of its service 
life, becoming noncompliant with government regulations and standards. 

EMERGENCY INCIDENT RESPONSE 

During 2009 the Wakefield Fire Department responded to 2,970 
emergency incidents, including 2,555 Still Alarms and 415 Box Alarms. 

On Sunday May 17th, 2009 at 5:25 A.M., The Wakefield Fire 
Department responded to a 2-alarm fire at 30 Summer Street. Firefight- 
ers under the command of Captain David Myette found a fire in the sec- 
ond floor apartment and were able to quickly extinguish this fire. No one 
was injured during this accidental fire started from discarded smoking 
materials however the residents were displaced until repairs could be 
made. 

The Wakefield Fire Department also responded to several "working 
fires' during 2009 that did not require the initiation of a multiple alarm 
but were serious in nature. 

A dumpster fire occurred next to the rooming house at 48 Water 
Street on the morning of July 5th. This dumpster was located next to 
the building and caused considerable damage to the exterior of the build- 
ing before quick work by firefighters under the command of Captain 
David Myette extinguished the fire. 

Firefighters under the command of Captain Joseph Riley responded 
to a fire in the former Lincoln School at 26 Crescent Street during the 
early evening of September 10th. A fire in a first floor bedroom was 
quickly confined to that room and the surrounding area. The Lincoln 
School, used primarily for senior housing, contains many hidden wall 
and ceiling voids that could have created conditions for an enormous fire 
destroying the entire building. The fire was accidental in origin and 



38 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



started in an area of the building that was not sprinklered. Fortunately, 
there were no serious injuries although several occupants were displaced 
for an extended period. 

A potentially serious incident on Carriage Lane was averted when 
underground power lines were accidentally dug up and damaged on 
October 20th at a new development on Carriage Lane. Firefighters 
under the direction of Captain Joseph Riley worked in conjunction with 
Wakefield Municipal Light Department employees to quickly control the 
situation and contain the damage in several of the development's homes. 

A house fire at 693 Main Street in Wakefield was quickly controlled 
by firefighters operating under the command of Captain Richard Smith. 
The fire, started by a pet when it knocked over a lamp onto some bed- 
ding, was quickly contained to the room of origin. 

There were additional significant incidents that occurred during 
2009. Although Wakefield was fortunate not to experience any fire 
deaths in 2009, there were a number of motor vehicle accident related 
fatalities that occurred during the year. Wakefield firefighters respond- 
ed to a fatal accident that claimed the life of a man on Route 95 on 
March 1st. A married couple from Cambridge was tragically killed dur- 
ing a serious car accident requiring the use of the "Jaws of Life" during 
the evening of April 14th. Despite the efforts of numerous bystanders as 
well as local Fire, Police and Paramedic personnel, Alyssa Nanopolous of 
Wakefield tragically lost her life when she was struck and killed by a 
vehicle while crossing the parking lot of the Northeast Regional Voca- 
tional School on Hemlock Road during the afternoon May 11th. Finally, 
a young man from Stoneham was fatally injured as a result of a serious 
motorcycle accident on June 2nd at the intersection of Prospect and 
Brook Streets. 

The Wakefield Fire Department responded to 67 mutual aid 
requests during 2009. Firefighters from Engine 2 responded to a serious 
house fire at 125 Florence Street in Melrose on March 25th. While con- 
ducting a search for trapped occupants on the second floor, Firefighter 
Joseph Albert, assisted by Lt. Steven Kessel and Firefighter Joseph Nee, 
located and removed an unconscious dog from the burning home. Wake- 
field Engine 2 responded to numerous serious fires In Reading, Stone- 
ham, Melrose, and Saugus including a fire at the former Atlantic Lobster 
facility and the Resco incinerator plant, both in Saugus. 

PERSONNEL 

As of December 31, 2009, the Wakefield Fire Department consisted 
of forty-five 45 uniformed personnel: the Fire Chief; four 4 captains, 
four 4 lieutenants; thirty-six firefighters; and a civilian Administrative 
Secretary. A fifth fire captain's position, the Fire Prevention Officer, has 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 39 



not been filled due to budget cuts. Four more firefighter positions have 
been partially funded by a federal staffing SAFER grant and will be 
filled in the near future. 

Calendar year 2009 brought significant changes to the Wakefield 
Fire Department. 

Firefighter Richard R. Cardavelli retired from the Wakefield Fire 
Department on January 2, 2009 after serving the department for 26 
years. A Wakefield native, Cardavelli was appointed a fulltime firefight- 
er on March 18, 1982. Firefighter Cardavelli was the senior firefighter 
assigned to Group 1 under Captain David Myette at the time of his 
retirement. We thank Chief Firefighter Cardavelli for his service and 
wish them a happy and healthy retirement. 

Jonathan P. Murphy of 8 Williams Street, Wakefield and Christo- 
pher S. Sullivan, presently a resident of North Reading, were appointed 
Permanent Firefighters on March 30, 2009. 

Wakefield Interim Fire Chief Michael J. Sullivan was appointed as 
the new Permanent Fire Chief on September 1, 2009 after the results of 
a March 2009 civil service were received by Wakefield in August of 2009. 

Four more firefighter positions were filled in September of 2009 due 
to the federal SAFER staffing grant by laid off firefighters from a list 
supplied by the Massachusetts Department of Human Resources. Fall 
River firefighters Jean Pierre Lefleur and Jonathan McElroy and New 
Bedford firefighters Nathan Venancio and Joseph Allen joined the Wake- 
field Fire Department until mid-November, when they were all called 
back to their home departments thanks to federal stimulus money. 
These four positions are currently open and will be filled as soon as pos- 
sible from a new list of candidates furnished by the Massachusetts 
Department of Human Resources. 

Firefighter Daniel P. Sullivan received a commendation for his quick 
actions at a medical emergency on August 23, 2009. Firefighter Sulli- 
van, off-duty at the time, witnessed a man who was in obvious distress 
chocking on a piece of food at a restaurant in Dedham and immediately 
performed the Heimlich maneuver on him, clearing his airway. Fire- 
fighter Sullivan was instrumental in this man's successful recovery, per- 
forming a lifesaving action prior to the arrival of the Dedham Fire 
Department and emergency medical services. 

APPARATUS & EQUIPMENT 

The Wakefield Fire department did not receive any new fire appara- 
tus during calendar year 2009. 

Car 3, a 1996 Chevy Tahoe, on extended loan by Liberty Chevrolet of 
Wakefield since June of 2008, continues to serve the department well. 
This vehicle is utilized as a back-up to the Chiefs Car 1, the Fire Preven- 



40 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



tion Officer's Car 2, and the department's pick-up truck, Car 6, which is 
in poor condition. It is also used to transport firefighters to and from 
training classes. Car 3, like the other vehicles, is equipped to tow the 
department's rescue boats, Hazardous Materials Response Trailer, and 
Technical Rescue Trailer. 

The Wakefield Fire Department received a 2008 Assistance to Fire- 
fighters Grant from the Department of Homeland Security in November 
in the amount of $70,380 to partially fund the replacement of one set of 
personal protective gear for each member of the department. The grant 
funds 90% of the base cost for each set of protective coat and pants with 
the remaining money funded by the Capital Outlay allotment for 
FY2010. This gear was badly needed to replace the 13 year old worn out 
and non-compliant protective gear used by each department member. 
This gear was purchased and placed into service in October of 2009. 

The department also received delivery of 3,000 feet of large diameter 
supply hose for its three fire pumpers. This expenditure of $20,250 also 
came out of the Capital Outlay budget to replace the department's old 
worn out water supply hose and will insure a dependable delivery of 
water to the scene of a fire for many years to come. 

Additional funding came in the form of a $7,792 Massachusetts 
State Fire Equipment Grant during 2009 which was used to purchase 
the personal protective gear for the four additional firefighters added to 
the department from the federal SAFER personnel grant. The cost of 
this gear was not factored into the above mentioned federal protective 
gear grant. 

A Student Awareness of Fire Safety SAFE grant was also awarded 
to the Wakefield Fire Department in the amount of $4,900 during fiscal 
year 2010. This money, along with donations from the private sector and 
public grants, will fund a program with the Metrofire Regional Fire Safe- 
ty House to be presented to all the elementary schools in Wakefield dur- 
ing the fall of 2010. 

All of the department's equipment, apparatus, hose, ladders, breath- 
ing apparatus, etc. were inspected, tested and certified during 2009. 

TRAINING 

During 2009 the Wakefield Fire Department conducted training ses- 
sions covering the following topics: 

• Water and ice rescue procedures at Lake Quannapowitt and 
Crystal Lake 

• High rise firefighting training including the use of standpipe 
systems. 

• Basic ladder, foam and hose training review 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 41 



• Mass. Firefighting Academy - precautions against terrorism 
class - 7 hours 

• Mass Dept. of Public Health-class on prevention of blood Bourne 
pathogens - 3 hours 

• All emergency medical technicians completed a recertification 
class 

• Annual training with our rescue tools including the "Jaws of 
Life" , hydraulic rams, and air bags 

• Search and Rescue drills in the vacant Hurd School (1st half of 
year). 

• Practice of aerial ladder pipe procedures 

• MBTA compressed natural gas-fueled bus awareness training 

• Commuter train emergencies training program. 

• Chimney fire and related operations. 

• Awareness program on Citizens with various forms of Autism 
Street drills for new and existing streets in Town 
Review of emergency dispatch and radio procedures 
Trained with self-contained breathing apparatus and practiced 
procedures to rescue downed firefighters 
Pre-fire planning tours of the new apartment building at 600 
Salem Street, the water treatment facility on Broadway 



• 



Firefighters Jonathan P. Murphy and Christopher S. Sullivan grad- 
uated from the Massachusetts Firefighting Academy Recruit Training 
Program on June 19, 2009. 

Captain Paul Pronco, Firefighter Phil Rogers, and Firefighter 
Michael Long have been accepted into the newly formed Essex County 
Technical Rescue Team, which will become operational by February 
2010. Firefighter Phil Rogers is also a member of the Federal Emer- 
gency Management Agency's Urban Search and Rescue Team MA-TF1. 
Firefighter Joseph Cardarelli is an active member of the Massachusetts 
District 2 Regional Hazardous Material Response Team. 

FIRE PREVENTION - FIRE SAFETY EDUCATION 

All commercial and industrial property inspections in town were dis- 
continued due to the elimination of the Fire Prevention Officer from the 
budget and the corresponding lack of resources to conduct follow-up 
inspections. There has been a serious decrease in the number of safety 
inspections more than 500 fewer conducted in the community as a 
result of the loss of the Fire Prevention Officer position. As a result, 
potentially dangerous fire safety violations are not being discovered and 
emergency business contacts for properties are not being maintained. 
All schools, nursing homes, and hotels/lodging houses were inspected 



42 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



quarterly. Any establishment in town with a liquor license and those 
requiring a fire inspection mandated by the state received an inspection. 
All inspections were conducted by the firefighting shift on-duty, on a 
ready-to respond basis or the Fire Chief. 

The department also worked closely monitoring the annual Fourth 
of July fireworks and several blasting projects around the town. New 
housing units were inspected as they were completed on Carriage Lane, 
Heron Pond 414 Salem Street, Grace Court, Gates Lane, Montrose 
School Lane and 600 Salem Street. 

The Metrofire Regional Fire Safety House was towed to all public 
and private elementary schools in Wakefield during the last week of 
October and the first half of November. Thanks to a gift from ALCOA 
Reynolds Food Packaging and a state SAFE grant from Massachusetts, 
some 1,600 children in grades K-4 toured the fire safety house and 
received a hands-on fire safety lesson regarding home escape plans, 
smoke detectors, and common residential fire hazards. This fire safety 
program has been very popular and is an effective means of presenting 
vital fire safety and burn prevention information to our elementary 
school children. Several fire evacuation drills were also conducted at 
each school facility, and the department assisted in the multi-hazard 
evacuation and relocation drills practiced by each school during 2009. 

CONCLUSION 

In conclusion, I am grateful to the community and especially our 
Selectmen, Finance Committee and our Town Administrator Stephen P. 
Maio for their ongoing support during difficult financial times. As the 
department faces the New Year 2010, my goals are to keep the depart- 
ment fully staffed and both fire stations operational for as long as possi- 
ble. 

I would like to thank all the members of the Wakefield Fire Depart- 
ment, the Wakefield Auxiliary Fire Department, the Wakefield Police 
Department, all other town boards, committees and departments and the 
citizens of Wakefield for their continued support and assistance. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Chief MichaelJ. Sullivan 
Wakefield Fire Department 



STATISTICAL REPORT FOR 2009 

BOX ALARMS 415 

STILL ALARMS 2555 

TOTAL ALARMS 2970 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



43 



Medical emergency / motor vehicle accident responses 1 839 
Alarm malfunctions / accidental alarms investigations 417 

Public assistance / public service responses 136 

Investigations of hazards, gas & smoke odors 100 

Mutual aid responses to other communities 67 

Water hazard emergency responses 54 

Appliance fires / emergencies / food on stove 14 

Heating system emergency responses 26 

Electrical fires / emergency responses 60 

Hazardous materials incident responses 26 

Carbon Monoxide detector investigations 101 

Structure / Building fires 1 

Brush & grass fires 57 

Motor vehicle fires 23 

Rubbish & dumpster fires 13 

Malicious false alarms 3 

Rescue responses (water rescue, elevator rescue) 24 

Mutual aid assistance received by Wakefield 40 



MULTIPLE ALARM FIRES - 2009 

oo BOX 2-113 -30 SUMMER STREET -5:25 AM- MAY 17, 
2009 



EQUIPMENT USED 



EQUIPMENT 




USAGE 


1 l / 2 " Hose 




300 feet 


1 3 / 4 " Hose 




4200 feet 


2 VS Hose 




600 feet 


4" Hose 




1875 feet 


Ladders 




536 feet 


Air Masks Used 




89 times 


Salvage Covers Used 


6 times 


Smoke Ejectors Used 


29 times 


Fire Extinguishers 


Used 


12 times 



44 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



591 


967 


66 


84 


487 


869 


172 


198 



APPARATUS RESPONSES 

UNIT BOXES STILLS TOTAL 

Engine 1 - 2006 Seagrave 388 1517 1905 

Pumper 

Engine 2 - 2000 Seagrave 376 

Pumper 

Engine 4 - 1996 Seagrave 18 

Pumper (Reserve) 

Ladder 1-1995 Seagrave 382 

100' Aerial 

Car 6 - 1998 Chevrolet 26 

Utility Truck 

ADDITIONAL APPARATUS 

Car 1 - 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe 4 WD Utility Vehicle -Assigned to the Fire Chief 

Car 2 - 1999 Chevrolet Tahoe 4 WD Utility Vehicle -Assigned to Fire Prevention 

Officer 

Car 3—1996 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD Utility Vehicle 

Marine Unit(s) - 1980 13' Boston Whaler & 1995 10' Avon Rubber Rescue Boat 

Marine Unit Trailer- 2004 EZ Loader Trailer 

Technical Rescue Trailer- 2000 Car Mate 18' Cargo Trailer 

Haz Mat Trailer - 2003 Car Mate 14' Cargo Trailer 



FIRE PREVENTION REPORT 

Smoke Detector Certificates Issued 341 

Oil Burner Permits Issued 108 

Oil Storage Permitted (Gallons) 3 1 ,362 

Propane Gas Storage Permits Issued 19 

Flammable Liquid Storage Permits Issued 4 

Sprinkler System Inspection, Test, Service Permits 

Issued 122 

Fire Alarm System Inspection, Test, Service Permits 223 

Issued 

Blasting / Fireworks Permits Issued 2 

Underground Fuel Tank Removal Permits Issued 25 

Miscellaneous Permits Issued 6 

New Fire Protection System Installation Permits Issued 95 

Open Air Burning Permits Issued (Jan. - May) 169 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 45 



In-Service Fire Prevention Inspections Conducted 19 

Quarterly Inspections Conducted 88 

(Schools, Hotels/Lodging Houses, Nursing Homes) 



Annual Report of the 

Fire Alarm & Traffic Signal 

Department 

The Fire Alarm and Traffic Signal Department, with a $50,000 bud- 
get, maintains seventeen signalized intersections, thirteen fire alarm cir- 
cuits, and emergency communication centers in both fire stations. Each 
signal system consists of various components for signaling, vehicle 
detections, emergency vehicle priority control, and pedestrian walk sys- 
tems. The fire alarm systems involves nine Wakefield circuits, a house 
circuit, and mutual aid circuits for Stoneham, Melrose, and Reading. 
Radio systems, public address systems, phones, and box decoding equip- 
ment are used in both fire stations for communications. 

During 2009 seventy-seven calls for service or repair were made 
involving traffic equipment. These calls included the replacement of a 
large a three-way traffic head at Main and Water due to damage from 
high winds. Traffic accidents created knockdowns at Main and Nahant, 
North Avenue and Church, Chestnut at Emerson, and Main near 
Water. Three new flasher cubes were installed for the flashing signals 
at Crescent and Centre, Spring at Greenwood St, and North Avenue at 
Linda Ave after all three had failed. In addition to these calls over fifty 
calls for traffic and pedestrian lights out were handled. A new video 
vehicle detection system was installed at the intersection of Lowell and 
Vernon. This more efficient system replaces the worn out and aged in- 
road detection system that had failed. This project was done in conjunc- 
tion with Rick Stinson of the DPW and has decreased numerous com- 
plaints for this intersection. All pedestrian systems were tested twice 
during the year and 1 1 buttons required replacement. Several incandes- 
cent bulbs were converted to LED lamps. 

Traffic plans for 2010 include an expected completion of the State 
project on Salem St. The current temporary signals at this location cre- 
ated a large amount of complaints in 2009. Plans also include the con- 
tinued conversion to LED lamps and updating of aging equipment. 

Fire alarm responded to eight open circuits and 6 calls for intermit- 



46 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



tent opens. Two new master boxes were installed and three street boxes 
that were damaged by accidents were restored. Box testing, tree trim- 
ming, and wire resagging was performed. The cabling system benefited 
from installation of 3500' of new cable. Twenty-three pole changes were 
done including a large section on Main St in Greenwood. Over sixty fire 
alarm boxes were painted and refurbished. Master box fees collected 
totaled $28,500.00. Box painting, double-pole work, and wire replace- 
ment will continue to be goals for 2010. 

Issues with the communication centers in 2009 included a complete 
failure of the computer based radio system at Fire Headquarters over 
Memorial Day weekend. This resulted in communications being done on 
a less efficient back-up system for two days. A radio repeater site in the 
Montrose section had to be relocated after failing due to high heat sur- 
roundings. The fire alarm box decoder in the Greenwood station lost it's 
database and required reprogramming. The main communication goal 
in 2010 is to address the main radio problems at Headquarters. 



Report of the Emergency 
Management Director - 2009 

The Emergency Management Department prepares for natural and 
manmade disasters, serving as the local branch of the Massachusetts 
Emergency Management Agency MEMA and of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency FEMA. 

Wakefield continues as an active member of the 16 community Mys- 
tic Regional Emergency Planning Committee REPC. The Mystic REPC 
meets 10 times during the year and works to conduct and coordinate 
emergency exercises and procedures throughout the area encompassed 
by its members. 

Wakefield subscribes to Swiftreach Networks, a "reverse 9-1-1" tele- 
phone system that allows town officials to immediately notify residents 
and businesses via telephone of emergency situations and important 
community and school information. 

During 2009 all local emergency shelters were inspected and certi- 
fied by the American Red Cross. Training for emergency shelter volun- 
teers was conducted by the American Red Cross on February 19th and 
April 15th. Wakefield is fortunate to have a group of citizens ready to 
assist in the operation of an emergency shelter at any hour should the 
need arise. Several department heads in Town also participated in a 
training sponsored by MEMA regarding the use and set-up of an emer- 
gency operations center in Wakefield should the need arise. Wakefield 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 47 



also participated in several MEMA sessions on the use of library facili- 
ties for local disaster recovery centers, where victims of disasters would 
report for information and aid. 

Wakefield came very close to opening an emergency shelter during 
the morning of January 1st when a failure of the heating plant at the 
Harborside Healthcare facility on Bathol Street caused concern that the 
occupants might need to be evacuated to a warmer environment. Fortu- 
nately, The Wakefield Municipal Gas and Light Department was able to 
get the heat turned on fast enough to prevent this evacuation from being 
necessary. Members of the Fire, Police, Municipal Light, and School 
Departments worked closely with Action Ambulance and the employees 
of Harborside Healthcare to insure that the patients were never in jeop- 
ardy. 

The Wakefield Auxiliary Fire Department operates under the aus- 
pices of Emergency Management. During 2009, Auxiliary Captain 
Richard Harrington, Auxiliary Lieutenant Robert Sartori, and Auxiliary 
Firefighters Kevin Boyle, Al Catanzaro, Matthew Harrington, Michael 
Parr, and Matthew Nichols attended weekly training sessions and 
responded to emergencies as necessary. 

Thanks to donations by Richard Harrington and The Savings Bank, 
the Auxiliary Fire Department acquired a used 1981 Ford / Marion 
Squad Truck from the Scarborough, Maine Fire Department in March of 
2008. This vehicle was totally refurbished thanks to MacLellan Ready 
Mix Concrete of Wakefield at no cost to the town and placed into active 
service in July of 2008. The "new" Squad Truck replaces the well worn 
present 1971 / 1956 Mack Squad truck, which was transferred to the 
Woburn Auxiliary Fire Department for their use and is available to 
"back-up" Wakefield as necessary. The "new" Squad truck is equipped 
with a diesel generator to provide lighting, emergency power, and an 
eight-tank compressed air cascade system giving the department the 
ability to re-fill breathing apparatus tanks at an emergency scene. The 
Squad truck is also totally enclosed to provide Auxiliary members riding 
on it maximum protection. This truck has served the town well during 
2009 and all the assistance in helping to acquire and maintain it is 
deeply appreciated. 

I wish to express my sincere thanks to all department heads and 
their supervisors for their continued cooperation and assistance in serv- 
ing on the Local Emergency Planning Committee and to the volunteer 
members of the Wakefield Auxiliary Fire Department for their service 
during 2009. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fire Chief Michael J. Sullivan 

Emergency Management Director 



48 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the 
Building Department 

Report of all Divisions of the Building Department for the Year 
2009 is as follows: 

BUILDING DIVISION 

Building Permits Granted 620 

Building Inspections Made 1159 

Inspections m/w Fire Prevention Officer 6 

Inspection of Fire Jobs 1 

Request for Zoning Interpretation 793 

Complaints Investigated RE: Zoning Bylaw 244 

Sign Permits Issued 23 

Single Family Dwelling Permits Issued 25 

Single Family Attached Dwelling Permits Issued 4 

Two Family Dwelling Permits Issued 1 

Buildings Razed 8 

Swimming Pool Permits Issued 13 

Solid Fuel Burning Appliance Permits Issued 26 

Board of Appeals Meetings Attended 3 

Multiple Dwellings Inspected 22 

Lodging House Inspections 9 

Nursing Home Inspections 2 

Hotel Inspections 2 

Public School Inspections 8 

Day Care Inspections 18 

Certificate of Occupancy Permits Issued 78 

Certificate of Inspection Permits Issued 134 

Building Permit Fees Collected $204,478.00 

Permit Valuations For Last Six Years 

2004 $29,726,304.00 2007 $23,593,602.00 

2005 $35,960,807.00 2008 $29,106,143.00 

2006 $32,821,991.00 2009 $19,933,125.00 

PLUMBING DIVISION 

Permits Granted 337 

Inspections Made 499 

Inspections Approved 447 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 49 



Installations Not Passing Inspection 48 

Installations Corrected and Passed 48 

Meetings W/Pipe Fitters/Plumbers on Job 42 

Complaints Investigated 14 
Plumbing Permit Fees Collected $17,355.00 

GAS DIVISION 

Permits Granted 363 

Inspections Made 386 

Inspections Approved 355 

Installations Not Passing Inspections 31 

Installations Corrected And Passed 31 

Meetings W/Pipe Fitters or Plumbers On Job 32 

Complaints Investigated 10 
Gas Permit Fees Collected $11,889.00 

WIRE DIVISION 

Wire Permits Granted 556 

Residential Wire Permits Granted 407 

Commercial & Other Wire Permits Granted 156 

Inspections Made 1117 

Inspections Approved 961 

Installations Not Passing Inspection 152 

Installations Corrected and Passed 152 

Inspections m/w or Requested By WMGLD 37 

Inspections m/w or Requested by Building Inspector 2 

Inspections m/w or Requested By Fire Department 5 

Inspections after Fire Damage 10 

Job Meetings with Electricians 105 

Inspections of Public Buildings 21 

Inspections of Public Schools 24 

Inspections of Nursery Schools 1 

Inspections of Hotels 2 

Inspections of Lodging Houses 1 

Temporary Service Permits 17 

New Services - Residential 45 

New Services - Commercial Or Other 25 

Service Increases 84 

Complaints Investigated 4 
Wire Permit Fees Collected $32,437.00 



50 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



TOTAL PERMIT FEES COLLECTED $266,159.00 

Respectfully submitted, 

John Roberto 

Inspector of Buildings 

Report of the 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Summary of annual test and seals in the Town of Wakefield - 2009. 

Prescription Balances 12 

Pharmacy weight sets 6 

Scanner price checks 4 

Retail price computing scales 61 

Gasoline dispensers 173 

Fuel oil delivery trucks 104 

Wakefield medical scales 4 

High capacity scales 6 

Total number of devices tested 370 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert Rose 

Sealer of Weights/ Measures 

Animal Control I Animal Inspector 

Report for the Year 2009 

Below are just some examples of the calls and actions taken by the 
Animal Control Officer. 

Calls from Police 410 

General Animal Questions 3,445 

Calls Referred to other agencies 235 

Warnings & Violations Issued 120 

Court Hearings Attended 32 

Court Trials Attended 8 

Cruelty Cases Investigated 11 

Barking Dog Complaints 213 

Dog Bite Cases 11 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 51 



Cat Bite Cases 9 

Dogs Boarded 9 

Dogs Returned to Owners 9 

Dogs Adopted 

Injured Animals Rescued 556 

Deceased Animals Removed 475 

Humans Exposed to Rabid Animals 2 

Animals Exposed to Rabid Animals 42 

Suspected Rabid Animals by Species: 

Raccoon 19 

Skunk 25 

Opossum 10 

Woodchuck 35 

Bat 19 

Fox , 

Coyote 

Squirrel 1 

Rabbit 

Respectfully submitted, 

Kenneth J. Stache 

Animal Control I Animal Inspector 



Health 

and 

Welfare 



Reports of 



BOARD OF HEALTH 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

COUNCIL ON AGING 



54 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the 
Board of Health - 2009 

This year was a year of change for the Board of Health and staff. A 
new board member was elected in April, Laurel Gourville, RN, NP. In 
addition, longtime board member Sam Stella resigned in July and was 
replaced by one of the candidates who campaigned for the Board of 
Health seat, Elaine Silva, RN. Town Meeting approved a change in the 
Town charter whereby the Health Director would now report to the 
Town Administrator. The other major change came about July 1. After 
many months of working with the administration of the City of Melrose, 
the Board of Selectmen approved a Memorandum of Understanding 
which essentially combined the Melrose and Wakefield Health Depart- 
ments. The arrangement brought new staff with a shared Health Direc- 
tor, health inspectors and Public Health Nurse and an increase in ser- 
vices to the public. 

One of the statutory functions of the Health Department is to per- 
mit and inspect food establishments, semi-public swimming pools, recre- 
ation camps, and tanning establishments. In addition, staff responds to 
complaints from the community on these and other public health issues. 
The two communities share a full-time Lead Sanitary Inspector and two 
part-time Sanitary Inspectors. All food establishments received a cur- 
rent license and were inspected between July and December. This 
amounted to 255 inspections for 124 establishments. There were six 
plan reviews completed for renovations to food establishments as well as 
three establishments identified as performing renovations without a 
plan review. Finally, the community's new Farmer's Market added a 
new dimension to summer activities. In addition, 35 inspections were 
completed for camps, pools, housing, and complaints. 

The other main activity July through December was the preparation 
for and implementation of influenza clinics. The national declaration of 
the H1N1 Influenza Pandemic brought challenges and resources. Grants 
totaling $28,316 was received from the federal government to address 
prevention efforts as well as implement clinics. This money was shared 
with the School Department and purchased new refrigerators for schools 
as well as updated medical equipment. However, quantities of seasonal 
vaccine were delayed as pharmaceutical companies worked to manufac- 
ture both seasonal and H1N1 vaccines. With the assistance of over 50 
volunteers, three seasonal and two H1N1 clinics were held between 
October 6, 2009 and January 4, 2010. A total of 2391 H1N1 free vaccina- 
tions were administered to people 6 months to 102 years old as well as 
987 seasonal flu vaccinations! In addition, 73 pneumonia and 68 tetanus 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 55 



shots were given. 

The Public Health Nurse follows up on all reported communicable 
diseases. In 2009 this amounted to 83 cases. In addition, 24 animal 
bites were referred to the Animal Control Officer. 

Campylobacter 4 

Hep-C 18 

Legionellosis 1 

Lyme 27 

Meningitis 4 

Pertussis whopping cough 2 

Salmonellosis 3 

Streptococcal Infection 8 

Tuberculosis 4 

Other 13 

Shingles vaccinations were offered to people over 60 at no charge as 
the vaccine was supplied by the MA Department of Public Health. Nine- 
teen Wakefield residents took advantage of this program which is 
planned to be repeated in 2010. Hepatitis B and tetanus vaccinations 
were administered to twelve DPW employees with the assistance of the 
school nurses. 

A $1900 grant was received from the MA Department of Public 
Health for a kiosk to accept used sharps needles from the community. 
It was set up in the lobby of the Public Safety Building to maximize 
accessibility. 

Wakefield's tobacco compliance checks program ended with the end 
of the funding of Maiden's regional tobacco grant. No compliance checks 
were performed in 2009. 

Wakefield is one of 25 members of the East Middlesex Mosquito 
Control Program which provides mosquito surveillance, larval and adult 
mosquito control, ditch maintenance and public education. As there were 
two new members of the Board, the Superintendent of the Project gave 
an overview of the Project and its activities at the August Board meeting. 
Adult mosquito surveillance program used traps to collect mosquitoes 
from as many as 3 Wakefield locations per night. Data was compiled 
from 15 mosquito trap collections over 6 different nights. Selected trap 
collections from Wakefield were tested for West Nile Virus and EEE by 
the Mass. Dept. of Public Health. An April helicopter application of Bti 
controlled mosquito larvae at 39 wetland acres. Field crews using 
portable sprayers applied Bti in the spring and the summer to 12 wet- 
land acres when high densities of mosquito larvae were found in stag- 
nant water. For adult mosquito control, there were 6 crews assigned to 



56 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



apply Sumithrin to 2,800 acres at night using truck mounted aerosol 
sprayers when survey traps indicated high populations of mosquitoes. 

The Board of Health continues to support the funding of two very 
important programs, Riverside Community Care and the ARC of East 
Middlesex. Funding for Riverside Community Care subsidizes a sliding 
scale fee structure for outpatient mental health services; in 2009 215 
people received 4210 visits. ARC of East Middlesex provided vocational 
training to 20 Wakefield adults. 

Revenue collected for fees and permits totaled $52,355. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ann McGonigle-Santos, Chairperson 

Laurel Gourville 

Elaine Silva 



Report of the 
Housing Authority 

The Wakefield Housing Authority WHA was charted in 1963 to 
provide housing for low income elders, families, and the disabled. All of 
its projected income and expenditures are approved by the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts through the Department of Housing and Com- 
munity Development DHCD or by the United States Department of 
Housing and Urban Development HUD. 

I. Description of current housing programs 

Four developments are subsidized by the State Department of Hous- 
ing and Community Development DHCD: Hart's Hill 667-C consists 
of 116 one-bedroom units built in 1965 and 1968 for elderly/disabled peo- 
ple; Lincoln School 667-3 opened in 1981 contains 10 elderly one-bed- 
room units and three units of congregate housing for 15 clients; 38 and 
40 Hart's Hill Road 689-1 which opened in 1990 provides residential 
facilities for 8 Department of Mental Retardation clients; eight apart- 
ments of two-bedrooms each for families 705 were acquired in 1981. A 
forty unit building for the elderly/disabled, Crystal View Apartments (74- 
1) was completed in 1981 using funds received from the Federal Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development HUD. Two programs of 
leased housing are provided: 331 Section 8 vouchers funded by HUD and 
a 20 unit State Rental Voucher Program MRVP. In 2006, the Wake- 
field Housing Authority signed a contract with the Wakefield Senior 
Housing Corporation to be the management agent for the new Hart's 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 57 



Hill Heights 202 supportive living building consisting of 22 one-bedroom 
units. 

The Section 8 program has grown to 331 vouchers. The Section 8 
Family Self-Sufficiency Program FSS continues with 8 families enrolled 
in the program. Begun in 1993, the FSS program enables families to 
take advantage of a variety of options which are geared to having them 
achieve a goal of self-sufficiency within five years. We have had one fam- 
ily purchase a house; others have completed their education and/or job 
training and all have improved their credit ratings. 

II. Eligibility criteria for each housing program 

The eligibility criteria vary from program to program. They may be 
obtained by writing or calling the housing authority. At the present 
time, income-eligible people may apply for the State and Federal one- 
bedroom elderly/disabled complexes. They may also apply for Section 8 
Vouchers through the Centralized Section 8 Waiting List of which the 
Wakefield Housing Authority is a member. Wakefield residents or those 
who work in Wakefield are given a preference. Applicants are encour- 
aged to apply by calling or coming to the WHA office located in the base- 
ment of the Lincoln School House at 26 Crescent Street 781 245-7328. 

III. Financial information 

The most recent audit of the Authority's finances FY'09 is avail - 
able to the public for viewing at the Authority's offices at 26 Crescent 
Street. No audit findings of the Authority have been noted by the Office 
of the State Auditor for the last seventeen years. 

IV. Activities during the past year 

In 2009 the Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD 
allocated $62,417 to the Authority from the American Recovery and 
Reinvestment Act, for capital improvements. The Authority also received 
$46,063 from HUD for the Capital Fund Program. This was the six- 
teenth year that a grant was received from HUD to enable the Housing 
Authority to do capital improvement projects at Crystal View. These 
included funds to make the building more handicapped accessible; 
improve security; repave the parking lot; install new carpeting; paint 
common areas and increase energy efficiency. 

Hart's Hill Heights was completed two years ago. Occupancy for the 
23-unit building began in January, 2007. Under the U. S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development 202 program, the Wakefield Housing 



58 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Authority and the sponsor, Mystic Valley Elder Services, formed a non- 
profit, the Wakefield Senior Housing Corporation. Mystic Valley Elder 
Services will coordinate supportive services, maintain a meal site on the 
premises and hold activities for the tenants of the "Hart's Hill Complex" 
which includes the Hart's Hill Apartments and Hart's Hill Heights. The 
Wakefield Housing Authority is the management agent of Hart's Hill 
Heights providing administration and maintenance for the property. 

Administrative staff include Sandra P. Gass, Executive Director; 
Mary Lou Roche, Financial Manager; Eileen Green, Housing Manager, 
Frances Ales, Leased Housing Administrator; Jessica Rivera, Leased 
Housing Specialist; Frances Marshall, Administrative/Maintenance 
Assistant; Beth Greenberg, Tenant Services Coordinator and Family 
Self-Sufficiency Coordinator. David Perry, Michael Angeloni, Ron Marti- 
no, Richard Custodio and Joseph Ventura maintain the properties. 

Board meetings are held on the fourth Wednesday of the month at 
4:00 p.m. in the Lincoln School Conference Room at 26 Crescent Street. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sandra P, Gass, 
Executive Director 

Term End 

Alfred Confalone Chairman April, 2012 

25 Walton Lane 

Arthur J. Rotondi, Jr. Vice-Chairman April, 2015 

4 Newell Road 

Mary Daniels State Appointee June 2012 

42 Salem Street Treasurer 

Jane Good Assistant Treasurer April, 2014 

54 Overbrook Road 

Eugene Ruggiero Member April, 2011 

26 Crescent Street 



Report of the Council on Aging 

The mission of the Council on Aging is to advocate, promote and 
support the social, health, and economic needs of the citizens of the com- 
munity 60 years of age and over. The Council continues its commitment 
to the senior residents of Wakefield through advocacy, education, out- 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 59 



reach, transportation, health, and recreational programs in promoting its 
mission. 

The McCarthy Center maintains active and connected seniors 
through the lunch program, book club, day trips and other activities. 
Classes in art, computer, yoga, tai chi, strength training, aerobics, and 
woodcarving are some of the classes offered. Informational sessions on 
health insurance, nutrition, estate and retirement planning were pre- 
sented to keep seniors up to date with the most current information. 
Hallmark Health provided twice monthly blood pressure wellness checks 
and discussions on a variety of health topics. The center also hosts jewel- 
ry/watch repair, hair, nail and podiatry services. An average of 300 peo- 
ple use center services weekly. Over 1000 seniors took advantage of all 
services and programs available throughout the year. 

An essential service provided by the Council is transportation. The 
COA operates two vehicles which over 150 seniors used for their trans- 
portation needs. 750 trips to medical appointments, 580 grocery shop- 
ping trips, 438 trips for miscellaneous errands, as well as 750 trips to 
center activities were made. 

Wakefield is part of the Mystic Valley Elder Services network, which 
includes Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Reading, and North Read- 
ing. This non-profit organization works with local councils and residents 
addressing aging issues. They also administer the Meals on Wheels pro- 
gram in Wakefield and provide catering services at the centers meal-site 
serving 6300 lunches. 

The Council received state grant funding through the Executive 
Office of Elder Affairs Formula Grant in the amount of $32,963. The 
grant is used to support the activity coordinator and part time clerk posi- 
tions, offset the cost of exercise instruction and provide postage for 
newsletter mailings. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Judy Luciano 
Director 



Public 
Works 

Reports of 



DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC WORKS 

Engineering Division 

Forestry and Park Division 

Cemetery Division 

Fleet Maintenance Division 

Building Division 

Highway Division 

Water Division 

Sewer Division 



62 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the 
Director of Public Works 

The Public Works Department consists of ten 10 divisions and is 
responsible for maintaining the town's infrastructure and facilities con- 
sisting of Public Ways, Parks, Public Grounds, Town Cemeteries, Water 
Distribution System, Water Treatment, Sewer Collection System, Public 
Shade Trees, Town Buildings, Town Vehicles and Town Drainage Sys- 
tem. Additionally, the department provides services, such as: refuse col- 
lection and disposal, recycling and yard waste collection, street sweeping, 
snow & ice removal and support services to other town departments. 
The goal of the department is to provide efficient, effective and economi- 
cal services to the citizens of Wakefield. 

Over the past several years the DPW budget has been severely 
impacted by budget reductions and increasing cost for materials and sup- 
plies and purchase of services. With the exception of electricity, natural 
gas and vehicle fuel, there have been no major DPW increases in the tax 
funded operating budget since Fiscal Year 2003. Additionally, our infra- 
structure continues to get older and as the town continues to grow, we 
add new infrastructure that must be maintained, such as: water mains, 
hydrants, drainage structures, public shade trees, roads, etc. 

These are difficult times for the Department of Public Works and the 
Town as we try to maintain our infrastructure and meet our role as a 
first responder during emergencies. This past year we have experienced 
delays, backlogs and postponed some routine maintenance projects due 
to decreased staffing and reduced budgets; the adding of responsibilities; 
and substantial increases in material and supply cost. State Chapter 90 
funding which provides the money used for paving roads now only pro- 
vides 38.4 percent of the annual funding needed for roadway paving. 

This coming Fiscal Year 2011 it will be even more difficult to pro - 
vide the services that Wakefield residents have come to expect. Howev- 
er, the DPW will continue to make every effort to maintain core services, 
provide for the health and safety of our residents, maintain existing 
infrastructure and insure that the department meets its public safety 
responsibilities. 

In Fiscal Year 2009 the Department of Public Works was involved in 
a number of major programs, some of which include: 

• Dolbeare School Playground and Soccer Field - The DPW 
worked closely with the Wakefield Soccer Association and par- 
ents in the design and construction of a new playground and 
soccer field at the Dolbeare School. Both facilities will be in 
operation in the spring of 2010. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 63 



• Audubon Road Improvements - The DPW worked closely with 
National Development to obtain 6.6 million dollars in American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act ARRA funding for roadway 
and pedestrian improvements on Audubon Road. The project 
will begin in the spring of 2010. 

• Energy Conservation - The DPW worked with the Energy Con- 
servation Committee in the implementation of a Performance 
Contract that will reduce energy usage, reduce the Town's Car- 
bon Footprint, improve aging equipment and provide energy 
savings in the future. The actual construction work is expected 
to begin in 2010. 

• World War II Memorial Rebuild - The DPW has worked closely 
with the World War II Committee to replace the existing struc- 
ture with a more permanent structure. To date, draft plans of 
the area have been completed and fundraising activities are on- 
going. Your support and contributions are important to ensure 
the success of this important project. 

In looking forward to 2010 and beyond the department will be 
involved in a number of major projects: 

• The DPW will continue to make improvements to our aging 
sewer system with the goal of reducing Inflow/Infiltration. 

• The DPW will continue coordinating the Town's NPDES 
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System, stormwater 
phase II program. The goal of the program is to improve the 
quality of storm water that is discharged to water bodies in the 
system. This federal mandate is unfunded and requires the 
Town to commit both funding and staffing resources towards 
this regulation. The first five 5 year permit has ended and the 
EPA is in the process of implementing a new five 5 year per - 
mit. The requirements of the new permit are expected to be 
more costly and consume more staff resources. 

• It is anticipated that construction on the Salem Street and three 
3 intersections roadway improvement project will be complete 
in 2010. This is a state funded improvement project TIP. The 
project will improve pedestrian and vehicle safety on Salem 
Street from the Route 128 north bound off ramps at Montrose 
Avenue to the east side of Pleasure Island Road. 

• In December 2007 the DPW submitted the town's Notice of Con- 
tinuation to continue the Town's existing Train Horn Quiet 
Zones. The work on the improvements will begin in April 2010 
and be completed by the end of FY 2010. The planned improve- 
ments have been reviewed by the Traffic Advisory Committee 



64 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



and approved by the Board of Selectmen. The improvements 
include roadway modifications to three 3 crossing areas: 
Broadway, Chestnut Street and Prospect Street. The work will 
be accomplished using Chapter 90 funding. 

• The DPW has been working on preliminary plans for five major 
water projects that will commence in Fiscal Year 2010. These 
projects include repairs and upgrades to the Town's Water 
standpipe located on Hart's Hill, the installation of two 2 
water booster stations that will provide the required minimum 
pressures in the Castle Clare, and Sidney Street areas, water 
main improvements in the Lotus/Bonair area to improve pres- 
sure, improvements to the Bay state Road water supply system, 
the implementation of a new water/sewer billing system and the 
continuation of the water meter replacement program. These 
are major projects that will insure that we provide quality ser- 
vice to our residents. 

• The DPW and Advisory Board of Public Works continue to work 
on a long-term plan for Forest Glade Cemetery. The plan at a 
minimum will include: maximizing existing space, laying out 
existing space that has been developed and development of 
untouched areas. 

• The DPW works closely with a number of community groups in 
making Wakefield a great community. These groups include: 
Wakefield Center Neighborhood Association, Friends of Lake 
Quannapowitt, Pride in Wakefield, Wakefield Garden Club, 
Trees for Wakefield, Lions Club and Rotary Club. The DPW is 
grateful for the support and dedication of these groups. 

For details of department accomplishments, I refer you to the divi- 
sional reports. Also, I would like to thank the following supervisors for 
their support during the year and for their assistance in preparing this 
report. 

Michael W. Martello, Business Manager 

Michael P. Collins, P.E., Town Engineer 

Tim Healy, Buildings Manager 

Don Schneider, Highway Supervisor 

Dennis Gorman, Fleet Maintenance Supervisor 

Dennis P. Fazio, Forestry / Parks & Cemetery Supervisor 

Steve Fitzpatrick, Water / Sewer Supervisor 
During calendar year 2009, two key members of the Department of 
Public Works retired: 

• Nancy Gerry 

• Thomas Doren 

The DPW wants to congratulate both members of the Department 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 65 



on their retirement and wish them a very happy and healthy retirement. 

In a sad note, the following retirees passed away in calendar year 
2009: 

• George Richard 

• Arthur Sheppard 

The DPW sends our deepest sympathy to the families of these dedi- 
cated servants of the Town. 

Finally I would like to express my sincere appreciation and grati- 
tude to the employees of the Department of Public Works who worked 
tirelessly to insure that 2009 was a successful year. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Richard F. Stinson 
Director of Public Works 



REMEMBER 
REDUCE REUSE RECYCLE 



ENGINEERING DIVISION 

The Engineering Division participates in and manages many Town 
infrastructure maintenance and improvement projects. Engineering 
staff performed a full range of engineering tasks including evaluations, 
reviews, survey, design, cost estimating and construction management. 
The Division procures and manages the services of engineering consul- 
tants on major projects where the level of effort exceeds Division staff 
availability, or where a particular expertise is required. 

The Division provides engineering and specialized graphics support 
to all Town Departments, Divisions and Boards and serves as a technical 
advisor/reviewer to the Planning Board, Conservation Commission and 
Zoning Board of Appeals, as well as citizens, developers and their consul- 
tants. 
Engineering Division Projects: 

The Division evaluated conceptual approaches, designed and pre- 
pared cost estimates, obtained permits, publicly bid and provided con- 
struction management for a number of projects, which were either peti- 
tioned by residents, funded by Town Meeting Articles or awarded as 
grants. 

• Water Main Replacement Project: The Division continued 
design of a water main replacement, from 6-inch unlined cast 
iron to 8-inch cement lined ductile iron, crossing through the 
rotary at Exit 40 of Interstate 1-95 Route 128, from the north- 



66 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ern end of Main Street near the Wakefield Animal Hospital to 
the western end of Bay State Road near Camp Curtis Guild. 
Test pits and pipe samples were obtained to aid in the design 
decision process. The project is expected to be bid and con- 
structed in 2010. 

Train Horn Quiet Zone Continuation: The Engineering 
Division performed field survey and prepared plans for modifi- 
cations to roadway near the Massachusetts Bay Commuter Rail 
MBCR crossings at Prospect Street, Chestnut Street and 
Broadway to maintain the train horn quiet zone status along 
the Town's railway system within the Wakefield town bound- 
aries. 

The Town's approach was established in 2007, when the 
Town performed an analysis which identified a conceptual plan 
for modifying these three crossing locations. The approach 
meets the criteria of the Federal Railroad Administration for a 
Train Horn Quiet Zone for the MBCR corridor within the town 
boundaries. 

The Town's approach to maintaining the continuation of 
the quiet zone in Wakefield at Prospect Street and Broadway is 
to construct raised granite islands in the center of the roadway. 
The islands will extend from within one-foot of the end of the 
gate arms, when they are in the down position due to the pres- 
ence of a train, to some distance up the street. The purpose of 
the islands is to deter on-coming traffic from going around the 
gate arms. 

The Town's approach to maintaining the continuation of 
the quiet zone in Wakefield at Chestnut Street is to change 
Chestnut Street to a one-way from North Avenue to Tuttle 
Street. In addition the one-way restriction on Murray Street 
will be reversed to allow passage from Chestnut Street to Albion 
Street, where a left turn onto Albion Street will be allowed. 
Raised, granite islands including planting areas will be con- 
structed to envelop the half of Chestnut Street which was used 
by traffic to pass from Tuttle Street to North Avenue. 

After a field visit with, and review of the plans by, the 
Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities DPU, the DPW 
received a Notice to Proceed with the construction of the modifi- 
cations at the railroad crossings. 

Americal Civic Center Stormwater Discharge Removal 
from Sewer System: The Engineering Division continued its 
efforts to identify the sources of stormwater discharge from the 
Americal Civic Center to the Town's sewer system. Stormwater 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 67 



runoff is not allowed to discharge to the Town's sewer system 
and must be re-routed to the storm drain system. Numerous 
dye-water tests were conducted to determine the configuration 
and discharge of roof, stairwell and area stormwater drains. 
Plans for future re-routing of drain pipes from the sewer system 
to the drain system are currently being designed by the Divi- 
sion. The stormwater re-routing work will occur in the early 
spring of 2010. 

Azarian Court Roadway Betterment: Upon receipt of a 
petition from the residents that abut Azarian Court to improve 
the roadway. As of this date a scope of work, cost estimate, sur- 
vey and Warrant Article for the May 2010 Town Meeting have 
been prepared. The Azarian Court way layout needs to be 
revised to provide sufficient roadway width and proper layout. 
Dolbeare School Playground and Soccer Field: The Divi- 
sion worked with the DPW Parks Division to provide layout and 
elevation control for the playground equipment. Once the play- 
ground was completed and opened the Division was then asked 
to perform survey services for laying out and properly grading a 
new soccer field near the playground. 

Well Water Mapping Atlas for Board of Health: Upon a 
request from the Board of Health the Division prepared an atlas 
map of the Town showing the location and type of use of each 
known groundwater well in Wakefield. 

Coolidge Road Betterment: Upon receipt of a petition for a 
roadway betterment of Coolidge Road from the residents, the 
Division performed a preliminary design and cost estimate. 
After review and consideration of the betterment design and 
cost the residents decided to withdraw the petition from going 
forward at this time. 

Natural Hazard Mitigation Grant: A Grant from the Massa- 
chusetts Emergency Management Agency MEMA was 
received in 2008 to design, fabricate and install trash racks on 
drain culvert inlets throughout the Town. In late-2009 public 
bids were received for 7 of the locations and a contract awarded 
to the low bidder to fabricate the 7 trash racks of stainless steel 
and install them in early-2010. A Grant Amendment was 
applied for with MEMA in late-2009 and if approved up to 
another 5 trash racks will be fabricated and installed in the 
first-half of 2010. 

Gerry Lane Roadway Betterment: The roadway betterment 
approved at the April 2008 Annual Town Meeting for Gerry 
Lane, a private way, was constructed and completed in 2009. 



68 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



The work included removal of the old pavement, removal and 
replacement of unsuitable gravel sub-base, grading of the road- 
way gravel and installing a new bituminous roadway and berm, 
with loam and seed landscaping at the edges where needed. 

• Wyoma Street Roadway Betterment: A public hearing was 
conducted at an Advisory Board of Public Works meeting in ear- 
ly-2009 to review the proposed scope and cost of a roadway bet- 
terment of the reach of Wyoma Street between Lakeview 
Avenue and Quannapowitt Avenue. After review and consider- 
ation of the betterment cost, the residents decided to withdraw 
the petition from going forward at this time. 

The Engineering Division is working with professional engineering con- 
sultants on a number of key projects: 

• Rehabilitation of Sewer manholes in Hoodplain areas, 
and tributary to Allison Hayes Pump Station and on the 
Town Outfall Trunk Sewer: Follow up warranty testing and 
inspection of the construction contract completed in 2008 by 
Green Mountain Pipeline Services of Vermont was conducted in 
early-2009. The 2008 work included sealing and lining 44 sewer 
manholes and replacing the manhole frame and cover on 10 
sewer manholes in floodplain areas. This work resulted in 
removing approximately 86,900 gallons per day of infiltration 
and up to 2,225,000 gallons per day of peak inflow from the sew- 
er system during extreme flooding conditions. Work also includ- 
ed sealing and lining of 35 sewer manholes in the sewer system 
tributary to the MWRA Allison Hayes pumping station, remov- 
ing approximately 21,240 gallons per day of infiltration. There 
were also two sewer manholes on the Town brick trunk outfall 
trunk sewer, which were sealed and lined to cost-effectively 
remove excessive infiltration under this work. The follow up 
inspections in spring 2009 resulted in some minor repairs to the 
lining work at two locations completed in 2009. 

• Water System Booster Stations: The Division worked with 
the town's water consultant in designing a means to boost water 
system pressure and supply in three areas in Wakefield, which 
at times do not meet minimum water supply system pressure 
and supply standards, due to high ground elevation. These 
locations include the area near the Town's Water Standpipe at 
the intersection of Upland Road and Sydney Street; the Lovis 
Avenue / Bonair Avenue area and the Montclare Avenue / Cas- 
tle Clare Circle area. The design is scheduled to be completed 
by early-2010, with construction to follow. 

• Camp Curtis Guild Wastewater Pump Station Upgrade: 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 69 



The Division reviewed the design, construction and start-up of a 
replacement of the sewer pump station which serves the Camp 
Curtis Guild National Guard facility. This sewer pump station 
discharges to the Wakefield sewer system. The design that will 
be provided for a discharge flow meter that will be used to mea- 
sure discharged flows to assess the sewer volume billed to the 
National Guard. 

Meadow Walk Development at Sheraton Colonial: The 
Division participated in review of the design of traffic control 
system improvements on Pleasure Island Road and Audubon 
Road related to redevelopment of the Colonial Sheraton proper- 
ty in Wakefield and Lynnfield. The improvements include 
installation of permanent, hard-wired and synchronized traffic 
control systems on steel mast-arms at the entrance drive to the 
Sheraton Colonial on Audubon Road and the 1-95 Southbound 
Exit 42 On and Off Ramps. The work also includes widening 
and geometry changes to Pleasure Island Road and Audubon up 
to approximately 600-feet north of the driveway entrance to the 
Sheraton Colonial. The Division also assisted in defining and 
obtaining permanent easements and temporary construction 
rights-of-entry for properties on Audubon Road. These were 
needed for implementation of the traffic control system improve- 
ments. The project construction was scheduled to start in early 
2010. This is a Federal funded project under the American 
Recovery and Reinvestment Act. 

Salem Street - Three Intersections Project: This project 
includes improvements to the Salem Street corridor between 
Chapman Road and Walton Street, including a short reach of 
Pleasure Island Road to the Route 1-95 bridge, and several hun- 
dred feet of the northern end of Montrose Avenue. The 
improvements include installation of permanent, hard-wired 
and synchronized traffic control systems on steel mast-arms at 
the intersections of Salem Street at 1.) Route 1-95 Exit 42, 2.) 
Montrose Avenue and 3.) Pleasure Island Road. The work also 
includes widening and geometry changes to Salem Street as 
well as reconfiguring the ramp at Exit 42. The project was fully 
funded for construction and resident engineering services in Fis- 
cal Year 2009 and construction began in spring 2009 with 
expected completion by late-2010. The work under this project 
will be interconnected and synchronized with the traffic 
improvements being constructed on Audubon Road. 
Woburn Toyota Site Trunk Sewer Relocation: The Divi- 
sion reviewed the design from Whitman & Bingham Associates 



70 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



of Leominster, MA on behalf of Woburn Toyota regarding a pro- 
posed relocation of the Quannapowitt Trunk Sewer that crosses 
through the existing Volvo Dealership at 614 North Avenue. 
Woburn Toyota is proposing to move the trunk sewer to allow 
for a new building to be built on the site in a location where the 
trunk sewer presently crosses through the property. The design 
was finalized in 2009 under the review of the DPW Engineering 
and Water & Sewer Divisions. The sewer realignment and 
change in corresponding sewer easement were approved and 
endorsed by the Board of Selectmen in 2009. 
Infrastructure Management: 

The Engineering Division is continuing to further develop a comput- 
er-based infrastructure management system for the Town of Wakefield, 
which will be used to provide a complete inventory of the Town's infra- 
structure, and will be utilized in future operation, maintenance and 
management of the infrastructure. 

• Digital Base Mapping of the Town: Engineering Division 
staff continued mapping of the below-ground utilities during 
2009. In the future, mapping updates for the Assessors' map- 
ping, roadway conditions inventory and street signs will be 
added, as well as developing a database GIS link for intelligent 
use of this information. 

• Sewer System Mapping: In 2009, the Engineering and Sewer 
Divisions continued the digital mapping of the sewer system 
which will provide a clear picture of system for use in operation 
and maintenance activities; and will be used as the basis of 
future system hydraulic modeling and system optimization 
studies. The project will continue in 2010. 

• Drainage System Mapping: The digital mapping of the 
Town's drainage system continued in 2009. The drainage sys- 
tem mapping in 2009 included major drainage collector systems 
to Lake Quannapowitt. The drainage system investigations and 
mapping efforts will continue in 2010, with more of the major 
drainage collector systems to Lake Quannapowitt and tributary 
systems. 

• National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System 
NPDES Phase II Stormwater Discharge Permit: Engi- 
neering Division personnel continued to coordinate and imple- 
ment the requirements of the Town's NPDES Phase II 
stormwater discharge permit. 

• DPW Engineering Standards: The Division continued to 
update the DPW engineering standards for construction of road- 
ways, curbing and sidewalks; water, sewer and drainage utility 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 71 



systems; landscaping and other Town infrastructure related 
items. These standards include construction details and stan- 
dards for the work. These standards will continue to be updat- 
ed and used to guide infrastructure work in the future. 
The Engineering Division provided engineering review in support of 
permitting, design and approval, conducted or managed construction 
inspections, and provided administrative support to the Planning Board, 
Zoning Board of Appeals and Conservation Commission for many pro- 
jects including the following: 

• Appleton Cliffs Apartments & Condos 135 Units off Hopkins 
Street - approved 

Blue Jay Circle subdivision off Preston Street - proposal 
Meadow Walk development at the Colonial Sheraton in Wake- 
field and Lynnfield - approval and start of construction 
Gates of Greenwood subdivision off Green Street - construction 
Grace Court subdivision on Montrose Avenue - construction 
Montrose School Lane subdivision on Lowell Street - construc- 
tion 

Patriot Estates subdivision on Salem Street - construction 
Carriage Lane subdivision at 120 Main Street - construction 

FORESTRY & PARKS DIVISION 

The Forestry Division is responsible for the planting, pruning, 
spraying and removal of public shade trees on public property. Exten- 
sive work is done seasonally to and around Lake Quannapowitt. 

The Park Division is responsible for the proper maintenance of the 
upper and lower commons, all parks, playgrounds, athletic fields, and 
many roadside areas, including twenty-two 22 islands. This division 
maintains over one hundred 100 acres of parks and recreational land 
under the Public Works jurisdiction. This division is responsible for all 
rubbish removal at all parks, school fields and downtown areas. 

Major emphasis was placed on school athletic fields continuing an 
aggressive aeration and seeding program. This program has expanded 
throughout all fields and parks. This division is also involved in the set- 
ting up and post clean up for all major festivals in the Town. 

The Adopt-A-Site program flourished this past year. There were 
twenty-two 22 locations and thirty 30 flowering whiskey barrels with- 
in Wakefield. This required this Division to water new plants at 14 loca- 
tions several times a week as needed. 



Forestry Division: 

358 tree works requested completed 
92 shade trees removed 



72 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



35 shade trees planted 
2 shade trees donated 
25 stumps ground 
Major Projects: 

• Tree City USA Award 

• Continued Tree Planting Program with Trees for Wakefield 

• Increased effort for planting shade trees via shade tree article 

• Finished Moulton Field project via grant 

• Community Playground built at the Dolbeare School 

• Renovate / build new soccer field at Dolbeare School 

• Refurbish Woodville School playground 

• Renovate back diamond at Mapleway Park 

• Town wide goose control 

• Pickup and chip residents Christmas Trees 

Park Division: 

Winter sidewalk plowing 

19 School Sand barrels 

Cleaning and refurbishing filter berm on Lake Quannapowitt 

Monitoring water level on Lake Quannapowitt 

Set up and cleanup for all town festivals 

Maintenance on all 13 playgrounds 

Daily maintenance on all 14 Town ball fields 

Set up and cleanup for all major school athletic events 

Field line painting 366,003 l.f./69.3 miles 

Seasonal roadside mowing 

Collected refuse from parks and schools - 85.42 tons 

Seasonal painting of all park barrels 

CEMETERY DIVISION 

The Cemetery Division is responsible for the operation and mainte- 
nance of the Forest Glade Cemetery and the Old Church Street Ceme- 
tery. The seasonal tasks of lawn and tree trimming, as well as planting 
have grown each year. Continued to survey new sections. 

Cemetery Revenue: 

Number of foundations installed 87 

Number of interments 139 

Income from sale of graves $ 81,735.00 

Perpetual Care $ 26,400.00 

Sale of Services Revenue $ 65,810.00 

TOTAL REVENUE $173,945.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 73 



FLEET MAINTENANCE DIVISION 

The Fleet Maintenance Division is responsible for the repair and 
maintenance of all vehicles from the following Divisions: 

140 D.P.W pieces of equipment 
16 Police Dept. Vehicles 
4 Fire Dept. vehicles 
2 School Dept. Vehicles 
2 Council of Aging Vans 
1 Building Inspector's Car 
1 Animal Control Officer's truck 

The Division provides preventative maintenance on a scheduled dai- 
ly basis. All minor repairs and most major repairs are done in house. 
Fleet Maintenance responsibilities also include writing the specifications 
to cover the needs for each division purchasing vehicles. 

Vehicles purchased: 

One 1 for Water Division 
One 1 for Buildings Division 

Also responsible for providing all Departments including the Gas 
and Light Departments with both Unleaded Gasoline and Diesel Fuel. 

BUILDING DIVISION 

The Building Division of the Department of Public Works is respon- 
sible for the maintenance and operation of 39 buildings which include 
school and town buildings. The inventory of buildings includes major 
facilities such as Wakefield High School and the Public Safety Building. 
The Division is also responsible for minor facilities such as storage build- 
ings and field bathroom buildings. 

A major undertaking that was initiated during the year was enter- 
ing into a contract with Johnson Controls Inc., to perform an energy 
assessment of all town buildings. This assessment will determine the 
financial viability of entering into a performance contract for energy sav- 
ings. Selecting a contractor was completed through an RFP process that 
was overseen by the Energy Conservation Committee. Following the 
Committee's recommendation to the Board of Selectmen, the Depart- 
ment of Public works entered into negotiations with Johnson Controls 
and commenced with the assessment. The ultimate intent is to imple- 
ment energy conservation measures that will be paid for through the 
energy cost savings. 

In July of 2009 Nazareth Academy moved into the vacant Hurd 



74 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



School and is planning to occupy the facility for three years. The build- 
ing received an upgrade by the tenant and was prepared for occupancy 
by division staff. 

During the year work orders are processed through the division. 
Work orders consist of various types of work which includes electrical 
repairs and upgrades: HVAC preventative maintenance and repairs: car- 
pentry and window repair. Other work that is accomplished by the divi- 
sion is custodial duties and ordinary maintenance tasks. Most work is 
accomplished by division forces and a small percentage is out sourced. 

Some of the significant projects that were undertaken and completed 
during 2009 were as follows: 

1. Landrigan Field bleachers were modified for handicapped 
accessibility 

2. Partition construction in the upper level of the High School 
library 

3. High School fieldhouse received bleacher and backboard safety 
upgrade 

4. Information Technology office upgrade at Town Hall 

5. Construction of new security building at Nahant Street Yard- 
waste Facility 

6. Install new replacement compressor in the Dolbeare School 
chiller 

7. Install new classroom partitions in the High School 

8. Install infrastructure for school cafeteria point of sale system 

9. Install power distribution for computer labs at Walton and 
Greenwood schools 

10. Refurbish Town Hall flagpole 

11. Installed handicapped accessible science workstations at the 
High School 

12. Replaced steam traps at Galvin Middle School 

13. Installed new cooling unit at 5 Common St. 

14. Repaired Dobbins tennis courts 

15. Installed new dumpster enclosure at McCarthy Senior Center 

HIGHWAY DIVISION 

The Highway Division is responsible for the maintenance of 110 
miles of roadway. Included with the roadway maintenance are the 
drainage systems, sidewalks, catch basin cleaning and repair, traffic and 
street signs, street sweeping, leaf and brush pickup, the collection of rub- 
bish, recycling, and C.R.T's, propane gas tank disposal, school parking 
lot maintenance, stripping crosswalks, center lines and parking areas, 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 75 



also the operation of the Nahant St. brush and leaf drop off center. 

This Division is also responsible for the sanding and salting and 
snow removal of all town roadways, all Public Schools, Public parking 
areas, Safety Building, Town Hall, and Senior Center. 



TRAFFIC MARKINGS 



4" Center line 


92000 l.f 


4" Double centerline 


32000 l.f 


4" Edge line 


140000 l.f 


12" Crosswalk and Stop lines 


30000 l.f. 


4" Parking lines 


9800 l.f. 


Crosswalk centers 


8500 l.f. 


Directional arrows 


63 


Railroad crossings 


17 


8' only 


38 


8' School 


20 


2' Letters 


50 


6" Traffic circles 


2 



TRAFFIC and STREET SIGNS 

Traffic signs installed or replaced 105 

Street signs installed or replaced 65 

Sign poles replaced 150 

ROADWAY IMPROVEMENTS - PAVED STREETS 

Gerry Lane Betterment 

Lowell Street at Vernon Street intersection 

Water Street at Vernon Street intersection 

DRAINAGE SYSTEMS MAINTENANCE 

Replacement of 60 ft. of drainage pipe on Birch Hill Ave 
Replacement of 15 ft. of drainage pipe on Prospect Street 
Replacement of 75 ft of drainage pipe on Park Ave and Clarina Street. 
Cleaned Areas of Mill River and Saugus River 

Cleaned, flushed and cameraed Drainage Pipes on Bennett Street, Birch 
Hill Ave , Centre Street, Cowdry Lane, Emerson Street, Paon Blvd, Park 
Ave, Parker Road, Prospect Street, Sweetser Street and Water Street. 
Installation preparation work for storm water drainage numerous loca- 
tions 

CATCH BASIN CLEANING and REPAIR 

Cleaned: 1390 Basins this calendar year 

Repaired or Replaced 125 Catch basins and Manhole structures 



76 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



CRACK SEALING STREETS 

Main Street from Water Street to Melrose line 
North Ave from Main Street to Reading line 

REFUSE/RECYCLING 

Refuse collected 9,182 Tons 

Recycling collected 1,556 Tons 

MISCELLANEOUS 

Weed roadside curb areas Spring thru Fall 

Leave and Brush Curb Side Collections - 1 in May / 2 in November 

Approx. 8 trenches repaired using an infra-red process 

Rivers and Brooks maintained through out the year 

Business district swept and policed for paper and trash daily 

Hazardous Waste Day held at the High School in September 

Nahant Street drop off center maintained and manned for leaf and brush 

drop off 
Repaired over 325 Potholes and Trenches this calendar year 
Assisting other Divisions and Departments on different projects 
Installed numerous traffic signs for Traffic Advisory Committee 
In the process of replacing all out dated Street Signs 
Loam and seed behind new and repaired sidewalks through out the town 
Repaired numerous Concrete and Asphalt Sidewalks at various locations 

- safety improvements 
Over 1000 Work Orders were completed during this calendar year 

PROJECTS 

Nahant Street recycling area improvements in progress including: mate- 
rial processing and removal and re-grading of the site and installa- 
tion of material storage bins. 

Installation of 300 ft of new drainage pipe at Veterans Field. 

WINTER PROGRAM 

Town Facilities plowed, salted, and sanded along with 105 miles of road- 
ways 
Snow fence is installed on the Common in early December 
Over 75 sand barrels are placed at hills and areas that are needed 

throughout the town. 
Town sanders and plows are maintained 
Winter potholes and trenches are filled and maintained 
Snow Fall Total for Fiscal Year 2009 - 73.5 inches 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 77 



WATER DIVISION 

The Town of Wakefield consumed approximately 629 million gallons 
of water in 2009. There are two sources of supply, namely the MWRA 
and Crystal Lake. 

The Water Division is responsible for the operation and mainte- 
nance of the Crystal Lake Watershed, the Linden Street Pumping Sta- 
tion, the Sidney Street Water Standpipe and the Broadway Water Treat- 
ment Plant. The Division is also charged with the maintenance and 
repair of the entire distribution system. 

Distribution System Piping 

The Town's distribution system consists of approximately 100+ 
miles of water main piping. This system requires constant maintenance 
to ensure proper operation, reduce system interruptions, provide suffi- 
cient water for fire protection, and ensure water quality. Examples of 
Distribution system maintenance include; Repairs to water main breaks, 
replacement of older mains, service lateral replacements / relays, Water 
main flushing, leak detection and repair, replacement / repair of gate 
and curb boxes, Dig Safe mark outs, gate valve box marking and clean 
out, gate valve exercising, water main shut downs, pipeline disinfecting 
and testing, inspections to new installations and repairs by contractors, 
maintenance of pressure reducing valves, and inspection and mainte- 
nance of the Harts Hill standpipe. 

Water Main Replacement / Low Pressure Areas 

The Department continued with the water main replacement pro- 
gram throughout 2009. The year's focus was on identifying, field testing, 
and evaluating three specific areas in the distribution system with low 
system operating pressures and one area with a low supply situation. 
Together the Water Division, the Engineering Division, and the Town's 
water consulting engineers performed a complete evaluation of these 
areas. Methods for increasing both pressure and supply through water 
main replacement, additional new main piping, modifications to the dis- 
tribution zones, and the installation of two new booster stations have 
been developed. Plans for the completion of this work are currently being 
produced. Work on these projects will begin in CY2010. 

Broadway Water Treatment Plant 

The Division operates the Broadway Water Treatment Plant on a 
daily basis. The treatment plant draws its source water from Crystal 
Lake. The water treatment process includes; Intake screens, Fluorida- 
tion, Slow Sand Filtration, Disinfection, and pH adjustment. The plant 
is operated by departmental staff licensed as State Certified Treatment 
Plant Operators. 



78 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Water Quality 

The Division performs weekly bacteriological sampling at 11 sites 
strategically located throughout the system that provide a representative 
overview of the entire system. This sampling is conducted to monitor 
against the presence of pathogenic bacteriological contamination. This 
sampling also provides proof of proper disinfection, and confirms a distri- 
bution system disinfectant residual. 

The Division also performs multiple water quality testing as man- 
dated by the Department of Environmental Protection DEP to ensure 
water quality and to monitor against contamination. Continual testing 
and monitoring for Lead and Copper levels as scheduled by the DEP, are 
performed to ensure compliance with safe drinking water standards. 

Cross Connection Control 

The Division continually maintains an active Cross Connection Con- 
trol Program. This program consists of regular testing of existing back- 
flow devices to insure proper protection from backflow and back- 
siphonage of contaminates into the drinking water system. The program 
also conducts surveys of facilities throughout the Town in order to identi- 
fy and protect against potential new sources of contamination. 

Water Meters 

The Division reads approximately 8000 water meters per billing 
quarter 32,000 per year; along with additional readings for new 
accounts, change of ownerships, repairs, etc. 

Throughout the year multiple new meters are installed to service 
new accounts, while older meters are constantly being replaced to 
upgrade the system. Examples of additional maintenance on water 
meters includes, replacing frozen meters, repairing leaks, repair or 
replacement to outside registers, repairs to main valves, etc. 

Automatic Meter Reading AMR 

In 2007 the Division finalized the research and bidding process 
resulting in the purchase of an Automatic Metering System, Replace- 
ment meters, and Transmitting units. This system includes all the com- 
ponents necessary to read water meters utilizing a "Drive By" system. 
The Division began the system installation in 2008, and will continue 
installations throughout the next few years. This system will streamline 
the meter reading and billing process, substantially improving efficiency. 

Fire Hydrants 

The Division maintains approximately 900 public fire hydrants 
throughout the distribution system. Hydrants require constant ongoing 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 79 



maintenance in order to ensure proper operation during emergency fire 
fighting situations. The Water Division winterizes all hydrants each year 
to prevent hydrant freezing. At this time caps are removed, hydrants 
holding water in the barrel are pumped down and food grade antifreeze 
is added to prevent freezing. The general condition of the hydrant is eval- 
uated, and work orders produced for any needed repairs. Caps are 
removed, cleaned, and lubricated to ensure operation when needed. 
Hydrants found to have needed antifreeze are then checked periodically 
throughout the winter. Hydrants are also checked for proper operation 
during yearly water main flushing. Each year the Division cleans and 
paints a portion of hydrants as an ongoing process. 

Hydrants are also used for a variety of distribution maintenance 
functions such as water main flushing, water quality sampling, pressure 
testing and monitoring. 



Services and Work Orders 



Repaired 


14 


Water Main Breaks 


Repaired 


43 


Hydrants 


Replaced 


10 


Hydrants 


Installed 


1 


Hydrant New location 


Relayed 


8 


Water Services 


Replaced 


900 


Meters Approximately 


Repaired 


6 


Meters 


Installed 


55 


Meters New Account 



Work Manager System 

The Water / Sewer Division completed 3,475 service requests gener- 
ated by the DPW's Work Manager System in 2009. These requests cover 
a wide variety of repairs, installations, and situations responding to resi- 
dents needs. 

Snow and Ice 

The Division participates in all town snow and ice removal opera- 
tions. All Division personnel and equipment are involved in clearing 
snow and ice during storm events. 

Emergency Service 

For emergency service please call the Wakefield Water / Sewer Divi- 
sion, 24 Hour Emergency Telephone # 781-246-6318 

SEWER DIVISION 

The Sewer Division is responsible for the operation and mainte- 
nance of the entire wastewater collection system. 



80 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Collection System Infrastructure 

The collection system is comprised of approximately 90+ miles of 
sewer main and sewer service laterals for approximately 8000 customers. 
The collection system mains, service laterals, manholes, structures and 
covers, etc., require constant maintenance to ensure proper operation, 
reduce service interruptions, and to prevent overflows and back-ups. 

Examples of some routine required maintenance performed on the 
system include; main flushing and jetting to reduce the build up of 
grease and settled debris leading to main blockages, root cutting and 
treatment to clear and prevent the recurrence of root intrusion, cleaning 
and treating service laterals, repair and rehabilitation of manholes, cov- 
ers, and structures, Dig safe mark-outs for excavations, pipe repairs to 
broken mains and services, inspections of new main and service installa- 
tions and repairs by contractors. 

Pumping / Lift Stations 

There are nine 9 Pumping / Lift Stations utilized in the waste 
water collection system Farm Street, West Park Drive, Plaza Road, Find- 
lay Street, Audubon Road, Bay State Road, Lakeview Ave, Main St at 
Central St, and Spaulding Street Station. These stations collect waste- 
water from low-lying areas and discharge to points in the collection sys- 
tem at higher elevations allowing the flow to continue by gravity. These 
stations require constant maintenance of pumps, compressors, tanks, 
controls, and alarms to ensure proper operation and prevent system 
back-ups and overflows. 

The Division has an ongoing program for the replacement / rehabili- 
tation of aging wastewater lift / pumping stations. The Farm Street Sta- 
tion the largest station in the system with a capacity of 8 MGD rehabil - 
itation was completed in 2004, West Park Drive station was completed in 
2005, and both the Main Street at Central Station and the Audubon 
Road Station were completed in 2008. 

Inflow and Infiltration I&I 

The Division is constantly working in conjunction with the engineer- 
ing division and the town's consulting engineers to identify and remove 
extraneous flows into the collection system I&I. A few examples of 
these sources include; roof leaders tied into the collection system, base- 
ment sump pumps discharging to the homes sewer service, and broken 
sewer mains and system piping allowing groundwater to enter the sys- 
tem. 

These flows into the collection mains can exhaust the systems capac- 
ity resulting in surcharging, overflows, and back-ups. Identifying and 
removing flows from these sources greatly reduces the annual metered 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



81 



volume of wastewater discharged from the Town of Wakefield into the 
MWRA system, resulting in substantial reductions and savings to the 
Town's MWRA assessment. 

Services 

Clearing Sewer Service Blockages 159 

Clearing Sewer Main Blockages 20 

Dig Safe Mark Outs W/S 342 

Inspections 31 

Emergency Service 

For emergency service please call the Wakefield DPW Water / Sewer 
Division, 24 Hour Emergency Telephone # 781-246-6318 



2009 


PUMPING RECORDS AND RAINFALL 


MONTH 


CRYSTAL 
LAKE 


M.W.R.A 


TOTAL 

QUANTITY 

PUMPED 


RAINFALL 
Inches 


January 





51,500,000 


51,500,000 


2.4 


February 


7,183,000 


37,560,000 


44,743,000 


0.64 


March 


9,928,000 


39,090,000 


49,018,000 


2.89 


April 


9,766,000 


38,200,000 


47,966,000 


4.36 


May 


8,248,000 


49,760,000 


58,008,000 


1.64 


June 


8,384,000 


47,950,000 


56,334,000 


4.32 


July 


5,530,000 


50,900,000 


56,430,000 


6.82 


August 


7,046,000 


58,100,000 


65,146,000 


1.95 


September 


2,181,000 


54,660,000 


56,841,000 


4.63 


October 


1,697,000 


47,440,000 


49,137,000 


5.22 


November 


11,248,000 


34,870,000 


46,118,000 


3.47 


December 


12,393,000 


35,330,000 


47,723,000 


4.24 


Totals 


83,604,000 


545,360.000 


628,964,000 


42.58 



AVERAGE DAILY: 1.72 MGD 



HIGH MONTH: August 



Education 



Reports of 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

AND SUPERINTENDENT 

OF SCHOOLS 

LUCIUS BEEBE 
MEMORIAL LIBRARY 

Library Trustees 
Library Staff 

NORTHEAST METROPOLITAN 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 

HIGH SCHOOL 



84 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the 
Wakefield School Committee 

and 
Superintendent of Schools 

Anthony Guardia, Chairman 

Kevin Piskadlo, Vice-Chairman 

Lisa Butler 

Chris Callanan 

Cheryl Ford 

Daniel Lieber 

Carmen Urbonas 

Joan Landers - Superintendent of Schools 

Student Advisory Council Members - 2009-2010 School Year 

Nakia Brown 

Dan Liberfarb 
Nicole Mansour 
Mikayla Thistle 

REPORT OF THE 

WAKEFIELD SCHOOL COMMITTEE CHAIRMAN 

ANTHONY GUARDIA 

The School Committee welcomed back and congratulated re-elected 
member Anthony Guardia and Cheryl Ford. The committee extended its 
appreciation to outgoing chairman, Cheryl Ford, who very ably served as 
Chairman from May 2008 - May 2009. 

At the committee's reorganizational meeting Anthony Guardia was 
appointed Chairman and Kevin Piskadlo, Vice-Chairman. 

The committee established their goals for the 2009-2010 school year: 

1. Take initial steps in the facilitation and completion of the dis- 
trict's strategic plan. 

2. Complete contract negotiations with all School Department 
unions. 

3. Update School Department Policy Manual. 

4. Explore programming options for curriculum across the district. 

5. Approach Board of Selectmen for town- wide financial study. 

6. Public outreach of recent successes of administrative efficien- 
cies, while continuing to explore for more efficiencies. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 85 



7. Standardize curriculum by grade level to ensure all children in 
Wakefield receive the same curriculum exposure. 

As Chairman of the Wakefield School Committee, I want to thank 
the community, parents, school administrators and staff, who have made 
this year a success for the Wakefield School Department. This year, with 
the inception of the strategic plan and other initiatives, community 
involvement has been at an all time high. I want to thank my fellow col- 
leagues on all the municipal boards We have worked together on differ- 
ent levels to do what is best for our students, as well as the community. 
Without everyone's cooperation, that would not have been possible. 

I would like to thank my fellow School Committee members for their 
support this year. While we have certainly had our challenges; we have 
found an opportunity in each one of those challenges to better our 
schools. We approved two new contracts; one for rubbish removal and 
one for a new food service provider. The new rubbish removal contract 
will reduce costs and increase recycling efforts. The new food service 
contract provides for updating of equipment, provides for more nutritious 
foods and reduces costs by changing the methodology in how we serve 
food. We approved the creation of a new Financial Review Committee 
which will audit the entire town. At the Galvin Middle School, we 
opened up thirty parking spaces to be used for our downtown businesses. 
Based upon a recommendation by the Superintendent of Schools, we 
approved the process for creating a Strategic Plan which will put in place 
a long-term vision for our school system. At the state level we have 
voiced our opinions on proposed legislation, as well as sponsoring legisla- 
tion that would save taxpayers' dollars, by providing a tax credit to off- 
set local user fees. We have taken initiatives to move our schools into 
the 21st Century by overhauling our entire website to connect our school 
community and authorized a Virtual High School, so that our students 
will have access to more courses. The School Committee has not strayed 
from controversial decisions; as long as they were for the betterment of 
our community. We looked at the way we contracted for services; we 
consolidated resources and allowed for revenue growth through adver- 
tisements. 

Wakefield is a community identified not only for its many natural 
resources, but for the strong leaders who are willing to devote their time 
to the town we all love. This leadership needs to continue for the years 
to come. As further cuts come down from the State and the continuing 
need to deal with mounting local financial issues, Wakefield will be 
forced to use all its talents to ensure that we continue to move forward. 
Thank you. 



86 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



REPORT OF SUPERINTENDENT OF SCHOOLS 

JOAN LANDERS 

Volunteerism and Donations 

Volunteerism continues to thrive in the Wakefield School Depart- 
ment. The School Committee and administration are very grateful to all 
of the individuals and the groups who not only volunteer their services or 
have made contributions that benefited the students of the school sys- 
tem, but for their continued support of the educational programs. 
Through the generosity of townspeople and local businesses, gifts and 
donations to the Wakefield School Department for calendar year 2009 
totaled $57,629. 

Some of the donations that have directly benefited our students are: 

• Wakefield High School Dugout Fund 

• Exchange City Program @ GMS 

• Music Program 

• Italian Language Program 

• Technology 

In 2009, the Wakefield Educational Foundation continued to support 
the Teacher Mini-Grant Program and the Annual Celebration of Learn- 
ing. The money granted in mini-grants this year totaled $15,000 plus 
$4000 in grants from the Gertrude Spaulding Fund for Environmental 
Sciences. 

The Wakefield Citizen's Scholarship program gave over $435,000 
in scholarships to Wakefield students attending college. 

Personnel 

Wakefield High School Principal Elinor Freedman announced in 
April that she would be leaving the system after three years as Wake- 
field High School Principal. Ms. Freedman will take a position as Read- 
ing High School Principal. 

After an extensive search, the Superintendent appointed Nancy 
Santapaola as the Curriculum Director. Ms. Santapaola brings a strong 
background in literacy development and research-based approaches to 
teaching and learning. 

This past school year, the Wakefield School Department was deeply 
saddened by the loss of two members of its Wakefield High School staff, 
Priscilla Durkin and Kate Toohey. 

After giving many years of dedicated service to the Wakefield School 
Department, the year 2009 saw nine employees retire from the system: 
Patricia O'Keefe, Brenda DiNinno, Carol Egidio, Marilyn Hober, Marion 
Riordan, Marie Vacca, Suzanne Vandewalle, Gerard Alterio and Kath- 
leen Turner. The system extends their deep appreciation to these staff 
members, who contributed much to the success of our students. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 87 



School Department Budget 

Fiscal year 2009 will be remembered as being a very difficult period, 
during fiscally and economically trying times across the state. Wakefield 
was faced with mid-year reductions in local aide which had an impact on 
the School Department's budget. Fortunately the School Department, by 
taking a very conservative approach and freezing spending on all non- 
essential purchases, was able to get through fiscal year 2009 without any 
mid-year cuts to personnel or educational programs. The School Depart- 
ment completed the year with $880.17 remaining in its operating budget. 
The School Department was able to purchase instructional supplies, 
textbooks and technology equipment, as well as fill oil tanks at year's 
end, in anticipation of future financial challenges in fiscal year 2010. The 
district realized increased costs for substitutes, out of district tuitions, 
copier repairs, and medical services which forced the School Department 
to reduce spending in instructional supplies and textbooks. 

The expenditures for the school year were as follows: 

Personnel Services 20,893,002 

Contractual Services 3,729,457 

Materials & Supplies 1,300,652 

Sundry 14.706 

TOTAL EXPENDED 25,937,816 

Grants 

140-Title II Part A Teacher Quality 74, 187 

160-Title II Part D Enhanced Educational Technology 2,498 

240-Federal Special Education Entitlement 800,296 

262-Early Childhood-Special Education 36,554 

274 - Sped Program Improvement 11,279 

305-Title 1 117,500 

331-Title IV Safe and Drug Free Schools 9,580 

Capital Planning Committee 

The School Department through a vote at Town Meeting was able to 
fund the following capital requests, high school field house bleacher mod- 
ifications, construction of a new classroom in the high school library, as 
well as the leasing of a new bus for the Special Education Department. 
These projects totaled $68,330 and were completed during the summer 
and fall of 2009. Additionally in 2009 the following capital projects were 
completed: ADA compliance required fixtures for science equipment at 
the high school and a new compressor was installed at the Dolbeare Ele- 



88 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



mentary School. 

The School Committee and Superintendent continue to work very 
closely with the Town Administration and all Town Departments. 

Performing Arts Center 

The School Department sincerely thanks the Center for Performance 
Arts Committee for all their hard work and commitment to pursuing 
completion of a state-of-the-art performing arts center at Wakefield High 
School. When completed, this center will be a tremendous asset to the 
community and to the students in Wakefield. 

Massachusetts School Building Authority 

Superintendent Joan Landers submitted updated Statements of 
Interest to the Massachusetts School Building Authority in November on 
behalf of the Galvin Middle School, Greenwood School and Wakefield 
High School, according to submittal requirements. 

The Galvin Middle School built in 1954, while offering an array of 
programs at the school including foreign language, art, music, physical 
education, health, computer science, communication, technology and 
computer, is in need of additional space and an update infrastructure. 
Space for Special Education programming is a critical shortage area. The 
auditorium which is utilized by the community and district on a consis- 
tent basis is in desperate need of renovation. Limited classroom space 
and inefficiencies have caused the elimination of programs as well as 
hindered the development of new programs at the middle school level. 
The district is compromising the education of our students, as compared 
to the surrounding districts, because the facilities are outdated. 

The Greenwood School was built in 1897 with an addition built in 
1924. The lack of bathrooms on the upper floors results in substantial 
loss of instructional time and is in violation of code. Art and Music spaces 
are not in close proximity to the stage and auditorium. The facility has 
no science or computer labs. Numerous individual interior, building 
envelope, mechanical, plumbing, electrical and technology systems in the 
building are in need of repair. The school lacks proper infrastructure, 
hardware and electrical distribution systems for implementation of the 
district's technology. 

Wakefield High School was originally built in 1960 with major addi- 
tions made in 1972. The building is in need of major upgrades to the 
aging plumbing, mechanical and electrical systems. Due to a newly 
implemented high school schedule, classroom space is severely limited. 
In order to bring the school closer to the 21st century, upgrades need to 
be made to educational space, technology and the overall infrastructure. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 89 



Strategic Planning 

Superintendent Joan Landers launched the development of a Five- 
Year Strategic Plan for the schools in August, 2009. A planning commit- 
tee of twenty-six members of the community spent three full days over 
the summer developing the initial components of the plan. Residents, 
parents, school administrators, teachers and School Committee members 
dedicated valuable time to this process. The district's beliefs, mission, 
parameters, strengths, weaknesses, critical threats, strategic objectives 
and strategies were identified. The six strategies included: Community 
Relations, Student Learning, Funding, Facilities, School Culture and 
Professional Community. Presently, Action Team Leaders and their 
team members are facilitating the development of action plans for each 
of the strategies identified. These strategies and plans will be the frame- 
work to bring the district forward, beginning with the 2010-2011 school 
year. 

Programs 

The Wakefield Academy continues to thrive and increased their 
enrollment numbers dramatically during 2009. The program has seen 
an increase in enrichment and programming. 

Based upon a recommendation by the Superintendent and vote by 
the School Committee in 2008 to introduce a redistricting plan, the plan 
took effect for the 2009-2010 school year. 

Special Education 

As of January 2010 there are 3437 students in Wakefield, 580 of 
whom are students identified with disabilities 16.9%. The Wakefield 
Special Education Department is currently servicing those students in a 
variety of programs ranging from highly specialized services to self-con- 
tained programs where students spend their entire day. One of the pri- 
mary missions of the Special Education Department is to ensure that 
these programs are available at every level within the school system 
allowing for a continuum of services and a seamless transition from one 
level to the next. Transition planning for students entering young adult- 
hood has become a major focus of the work done by special education 
teams. 

The Career Placement Center at Wakefield High School has become 
an integral member of the team in helping to present options for those 
students completing their time in the Wakefield School system. In a 
recent survey conducted for the Massachusetts Department of Elemen- 
tary and Secondary Education, students from the class of 2006 were 
asked to respond to a number of questions regarding their activities since 
graduating. Eighty-nine percent of those responding were attending 



90 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



either two or four year colleges and seventy-eight percent were employed 
either part time or full time, while attending college. 

Curriculum and Professional Development 

The Wakefield School District continues to move forward in the area 
of curriculum and instruction, utilizing the research regarding best edu- 
cational practices for its students across all content areas. Training, 
committee work, workshops and planning sessions have been occurring 
at the elementary, middle and high school levels. 

At the elementary level, teachers and students continue their imple- 
mentation of a Balanced Literacy Framework. Beginning in September 
of 2010, there will be a new reporting system in grades Kindergarten 
through grade 4. The new standards-based report cards will provide par- 
ents and guardians with information regarding the progress a student is 
making toward the state academic standards. 

The Galvin Middle School has been focused on the areas of math and 
literacy. The staff at the middle school has worked together on commit- 
tees and with students to create learning opportunities that engage and 
motivate students in their mathematical development. 

The High School has been working diligently on its accreditation, 
involving all staff and students. The High School staff has been working 
on creating a mission and vision statement that reflects the needs of 
Wakefield and our current society. Key components being integrated at 
the high school level is the incorporation of 21st Century Skills. 

Wakefield continues to move forward with identifying areas of cur- 
riculum and instruction to be addressed through our Strategic Planning 
Committee, which will bring back recommendations in March of 2010. 

Students 

In the fall of each year the Superintendent presents the Superinten- 
dent's Award of Excellence. This fall the Superintendent's Award of 
Excellence was presented to seniors Rex Lam and Steven Parad. This 
award is presented to the highest ranking seniors and is presented at 
the beginning of the school year to allow the students to include in their 
portfolio for college. 

Guidance Department 

The Wakefield Memorial High School guidance department assisted 
243 students in graduating in June of 2009. They reached their post sec- 
ondary goal in various forms, 77% went onto four-year colleges, 16% to 
two-year colleges, 5% joined the work force and 2% joined our armed 
forces. 83 members of the senior class took 144 Advanced Placement 
exams in 13 subject areas. 78 % of the students received a grade of three 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 91 



or better, which is worthy of college credits from the colleges they plan to 
attend. 

The dropout rate for school year 2008-2009 was 0.4%. This success 
can be attributed to the hard work of the entire staff and faculty. They 
work diligently to assist the guidance staff in developing successful four 
year plans for all our students. Counselors attend special education and 
504 team meetings, consult frequently with staff and administration, 
comprise the majority on intervention and crisis teams, and act as the 
primary contact with families and community support agencies. 

The Guidance Office also acts as the Registrars Office of the school 
and by January 2010 seventy-one new students entered Wakefield 
Memorial High School. The guidance staff plays an instrumental role in 
acclimating a large population of new students into the wonderful cul- 
ture of Wakefield High. Along with a compassionate staff, the office is 
supported by two high school seniors, Alison Ward well and Gillian King, 
who developed a student ambassador program as a result of a Rachel's 
Challenge Program . 

Technology is a large part of the Guidance Office. The iPass admin- 
istrative system is used to manage the building and monitoring of the 
master schedule by the guidance staff as well as collecting data on grad- 
ing, attendance, discipline and state data. The counselors use a program 
called Naviance that collects data on college admission trends. The pro- 
gram is also accessible to students to use from home in order to search 
colleges and take a career inventory. Staff and students appreciate the 
town's support in purchasing and supporting these technology programs. 

Wakefield Alumni Hall of Fame 
The Wakefield High School Alumni Hall of Fame held their second Hall 
of Fame Banquet in March at which they honored eight former students 
and staff: 

Laura Sen Achievement in Business 

Wendy Dennis Community Service 

Brad Simpson Contribution to Education 

N.H. Supreme Ct Justice John T. Broderick, Jr. 

Contribution to Government 
U. S. Navy Captain Michael T. Palmer 

Contribution to Military Service 
Dr. Laura Guay Achievement in Sciences 

Tom Merchant Special Contribution to 

Wakefield Education 



92 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Wakefield High 

Hagop Abkarian 
Nicholas Adragna 
Adriano Aiello 
Fabian Albarracin 
Abigail Ameele* 
John Amentola 
John Anastasiades* 
James Andaralo 
Michael Andaralo 
Herbert Andrews 
Lea Antonuccio 
Jill Archibald 
Nicholas Arsenault 
Jessica Auger 
Anthony Balzotti 
James Beaton* 
Joshua Bennett 
Nicholas Blauvelt 
Amanda Bondi 
Matthew Bossi 
Chelsea Boudreau 
Courtney Bouthiller 
Zachary Boyages 
Nicole Bramante 
Nichole Brooks 
Dwayne Brown 
Richard Brown 
Taylor Brown 
Taylor Bruzzese* 
Stephanie Buzzotta 
Caitlin Bye 
Paul Callaghan 
David Callahan 
Christopher Callanan Jr 
Michael Campbell 
Andraya Carmilia- Smith* 
Linette Carvalho 
Alicia Castenell 
Maryellen Chansky* 
Edward Chaput 
Zachary Cipollo 
Devon Ciriello 



School Class of 2009 

Ryan Coburn* 
Amanda Colanton 
Heather Coleman 
Jacqueline Collins 
Brian Comeau 
Patrick Comeau* 
Spencer Connell 
Shawn Conway 
Shane Coogan* 
Meaghan Corrigan 
Bianca Cotter 
Caitlin Courtney 
Jaclyn Cranfill* 
Erica Cresta 
Derek Crocker 
Katie Crockett 
Emma Crooker 
Sara Curry 
Jesse Dacri 
Austin Dale * 
Jessica Dalton 
Christopher DeCarlo 
Lisa DeGuglielmo* 
David DellaRocco* 
Nicholas Dettorre 
Ryan Devaney 
Jaclyn DiCarlo 
Anthony DiMascio 
Hailey Dodge* 
Julia Donigian* 
Matthew Donoghue 
Michael Dotolo 
Toni Doucas 
Ryan Downing 
Christina Edson 
Raymond Elcewicz 
Kimberly Ellis* 
Gregory Evangelista 
Christopher Fanikos* 
Jason Federico 
Arthur Fennelly 
Shannon Finlay* 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



93 



Michael Fiore 
Jessica Fiorenza 
Michael Fitzpatrick 
Andrew Flannagan 
Jamie Fleming* 
Patrick Flint* 
Erin Flynn 
Emily Fosnock 
Demi Gallant 
Christine Galletta 
Elena Garland 
Camden Giles 
Catherine Goldstein* 
Michael Gover 
Hannah Green* 
Kayla Grenham 
Lauren Griffin 
Joseph Grondin* 
Alyssa Guarino* 
Derek Guertin 
Amanda Gurdjian 
Garrett Hancock 
Candace Hankard 
Caroline Hanley* 
Amy Hathorne 
William Healey IV 
Natalie Hennessey 
Brian Hurley 
Matthew Hurton* 
Martin Hyppolite 
Erin Jackson* 
Prateek Jha* 
Corey Jones 
Christopher Kanouff 
Joseph Keegan* 
Lauren Keough 
Katrina Knox 
Derek Krevat* 
Krzysztof Kuberski 
Andrew Kuks 
Anne Labriola* 
Marc LaPierre* 
Leah LaPlaca 



Andrew Larson 
Joshua Latham 
Jacob Laughlin 
Courtney LaVita 
Jennifer Lepore 
Amelia LoBrutto 
Yohana Lopez 
John Losco* 
Teresa Lucey 
Kimberly Luciano* 
Glen Maganzini* 
Justin Maio* 
Catherine Malone* 
Sara Maloney* 
Kelly Maloy* 
Matthew Marchant* 
Ryan Marchant 
Gabriela Marshall 
Marisa Martino 
Kayla Mathews 
Alexander McAuliffe 
Andrew McCarthy* 
Colby McCauley 
Kelly McDonough* 
Molly McGrath 
Jay McGregor 
Kelsey McGuinness 
James McLaughlin 
Michael McLaughlin 
Kara Meade 
Laura Meekins 
Andrea Meinert 
Alison Miller* 
Jeffrey Mitchell 
Haley Moore* 
Jennifer Murphy 
Anthony Nelson 
Anjoli Ngankou 
Lisa Nolan 
Jessica Noonan 
Michael Noonan 
William O'Brien 
Taylor O'Donnell* 



94 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Taylor O'Sullivan 
Elizabeth OToole* 
Gabriel Orlowitz* 
Caio Pacheco 
Amanda Page 
Renee Panarese 
Molly Passerini 
Saudi Pelegrin 
Carla Pennington 
Karen Perlera 
Justin Perry 
Kathleen Perry* 
Alexandra Pesaturo 
Kaela Petralia* 
Tyler Popp* 
Cory Porter 
Cassandra Raymond 
Michael Reynolds* 
Kaitlyn Richardson 
Brett Riley 
Matthew Riley 
Stacy Riley 
Natalie Rinaldi 
Alexa Roberto 
Timothy Robertson* 
Jamie Roche 
Kelsey Roche 
Daniel Rockwood 
Celeste Rodman* 
Alyssa Rollins* 
Ashley Ronzio* 
Jeffrey Sacco 
Adam Salameh 
Zachary Sallese* 
Arianna Sciacca 
Taylor Scott* 
Salvatore Scudieri* 
John Seabury 



Lauren Seabury 
Jennifer Sidebottom* 
Kerri Sidebottom* 
Michael Silvano 
Stephen Smart 
Derek Smith 
Jessica Smith* 
Robert Smith 
Laura Spang 
Jaclyn Spezzaferri 
Euston St. Jean 
Marvin St. Jean 
Jayne Stanley 
Alexandra Stec* 
Joseph Struthers 
Amaritta Sukkar 
Melanie Szabo 
Tara Tartarini 
Caitlin Tassinari 
Charles Taylor 
Derek Teixeira 
Michael Termine 
Sajan Thakkar 
Shauna Thomas 
Benjamin Tomsyck 
John Toothaker 
Nicole Tosi 
Jennifer Trant 
Katie Turner* 
Danielle Vasconcelos 
Jacob Vezga 
James Wambold 
Taylor Whitaker* 
Nicholas Williamson 
AnneXu 



National Honor Society 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



95 



MCAS SCORES FOR 2009 



Grade and Subjecl 


Advanced Above 
Proficient 


Proficient 


Needs Improvement 


Warning Failing 


Students 
Included 


CP1 


SGP 


Included in 
SGP 


DISTRICT 


STATE 


DISTRICT 


STATE 


DISTRICT 


STATE 


DISTRICT 


STATE 


GRADE 03- 
READING 


II 


12 


54 


45 


31 


33 


4 


10 


291 


88 


N A 


N,A 


GRADE 03- 
MATHEMATICS 


24 


20 


47 


40 


22 


25 


7 


15 


292 


87 7 


N A 


N.A 


GRADE 04- 
ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE ARTS 


16 


II 


55 


42 


27 


35 




II 


:44 


90 


58 5 


236 


GRADE 04- 
MATHEMATICS 


19 


• 16 


46 


32 


30 


41 


5 


II 


244 


88.5 


51 5 


236 


GRADE 05- 
ENGLISH 

LANGUAGE ARTS 


18 


15 


49 


48 


31 


29 




8 


280 


896 


42 


268 


GRADE 05- 
MATHEMATICS 


23 


22 


40 


32 


28 


2" 


1" 


18 


279 


83 5 


32 


267 


GRADE 05- 

SCIENCEAND 

TECHNOLOGY 


19 


17 


38 




38 


39 




12 


279 


843 


N A 


N A 


GRADE 06- 
ENGLISH 

LANGUAGEARIS 


21 


16 


58 


50 


16 


24 




9 


298 


93 


56 


280 


GRADE 06- 
MATHEMATICS 


28 


24 


38 


33 


26 


27 


7 


16 


299 


866 


53 


281 


GRADE 07- 
ENGLISH ' 
LANGUAGE ARTS 


9 


14 


67 


56 


21 


23 




1 


245 


91 7 


43 


227 


GRADE 07- 
MATHEMATICS 


17 


16 


46 


33 


28 


30 


10 


21 


247 


83.5 


51 


228 


GRADE 08- 
ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE ARTS 


9 


15 


72 


63 


16 


15 




ii 


273 


92 1 


40 5 


266 


GRADE 08- 
MATHEMATICS 


24 


20 


30 


28 


33 


28 


14 


23 


273 


77.3 


M 


267 


GRADE 08- 

SCIENCEAND 

TECHNOLOGY 




4 




35 


47 


40 


16 


21 


273 


706 


N A 


N A 


GRADE 10- 
ENOLISH 

LANGUAGEARIS 


:•■> 


29 


62 


52 


9 


15 





4 


219 


97 1 


48 


203 


GRADE 10- 
MATHEMATICS 


54 


47 


30 


28 


II 


18 


5 


S 


220 


92.5 


45 


205 


GRADE 10- 
SCIENCE AND 
TECHNOLOGY 


2fl 


16 


« 


45 


15 


2, 




9 


205 


92 7 


N A 


N A 


ALL GRADES - 

ENGLISH 
LANGUAGE ARTS 


16 


16 


59 


51 








X 


1.850 


91 5 


49 


1.4X0 


ALL GRADES - 

M Mill MM Its 


26 


a 


40 


32 


26 


28 


s 


16 


1.854 


85.5 


47 


1.484 






3SS. 




Elementary and Secondary Education 




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1 







98 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the Board of Trustees 
Lucius Beebe Memorial Library 

Beebe Library is a central and important element of life in the Town 
of Wakefield. The library is widely recognized by citizens of Wakefield 
not only as a vital resource for information and education, but also as a 
place for the community to come together. A troubled economy reveals 
the importance of the library to the community. This past year, the 
library has experienced a record level of reference activity - up fifteen per 
cent over the prior year. Its web site has seen a thirty-eight per cent 
increase as well. 

Beebe Library staff and leadership team work to ensure effective use 
of the reduced financial resources available to them. Their dedication is 
evident in daily operations and in the provision of services to patrons. As 
has the community at large, the library staff has been challenged to 
maintain superior services while dealing with reductions in funding. 
The most evident sign of the budgetary challenges was the decision to 
close one hour earlier Monday through Thursday evenings. This change 
was made after detailed analysis and careful consideration of all options. 
It was a bitter but necessary change. 

Despite the unfortunate reduction in operating hours, Beebe Library 
has continued to evolve and to extend its impact on the community. Peo- 
ple of all ages and from all walks of life are able to benefit from high 
quality and varied offerings. Programs were provided ranging from 
Mother Goose on the Loose Story Times and Growing Early Literacy 
Skills Through Music to summer reading programs and the Books by the 
Lake sessions. Workshops on resumes, job searches, and interviews and 
another on College Admissions in a Down Economy were particularly rel- 
evant and well-received. These programs demonstrate the range of 
impact that Beebe Library has on the community. 

The library is fortunate to have a dedicated and professional staff. 
It also benefits greatly from partnerships with organizations such as the 
Friends of Beebe Library and the Wakefield Chamber of Commerce. The 
Friends are tireless in their efforts and generous in their gifts of time, 
talent, and financial support. The Chamber of Commerce once again 
partnered with the library to bring together the Blossoms at the Beebe 
wine tasting and flower show. This fundraising event is a pleasant social 
gathering that supports the library's book budget. 

Library staff continues to seek funding from other sources. An 
example is the $20,000 LSTA Library Services and Technology Act 
grant from the Federal Institute of Museum and Library Services award- 
ed by the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. Funds will 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 99 



buy new technology and print materials, improve the furniture and 
appearance of the Young Adults' area, update the Homework Center, 
and provide programs. The library staff shows initiative in pursuit of 
such awards. 

We are very proud of the Beebe Library and of its contributions to 
the Town of Wakefield. It is important that funding for the library con- 
tinues to be a top priority of the Town. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Michael Bourque, Secretary 
Jack Havelick, Chair 
Donna Conlon, Vice Chair 
Nancy Delaney 
Tim Healy 
Christopher Janicki 
Harold Regan 
Kevin P. Scanlon 
Cindy Schatz 

REPORT OF THE LIBRARY STAFF 

Library Director 
Library Funding 

At the time of this writing, library administration is developing its 
FY11 five year facility budget, five year technology budget, and the 
annual operating budget, the last of which is level-funded yet again. For 
a measure of the magnitude of funding cuts, compare the $43,800 book 
budget of FY09 to the $127,000 book budget of FY03. Factor in a reduc- 
tion in State Aid to Public Libraries and it is evident that the library is 
unable to provide the materials it once made available to residents. 

Not surprisingly, the library has been unable to maintain its staffing 
levels and hours of service. Having laid off a part-time reference librari- 
an and having reduced the hours of all part-timers, it became necessary 
to close one hour earlier Monday through Thursday. As of this writing, 
two full time vacancies created by retirements remain unfilled pending 
information on FY11 state funding levels. 

To augment municipal funding, the library depends on contributions 
from the Friends of Beebe Library and private citizens. In FY11, the 
library will deplete expendable income from gifts and bequests. On the 
positive side, its partnership with the Chamber of Commerce for the 
Blossoms at the Beebe fundraiser added over $9,000 to the FY09 book 
budget and $11,000 to the FY10 book budget. 



100 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Current Initiatives 

While front line library staff delivers direct public service, library 
administrators seek other means to keep the institution knit into the 
fabric of the community. 

The library is working with the Wakefield Alliance Against Violence 
on Stories for a Safer Wakefield. Participants in previous Wakefield 
Reads events will recognize the community-wide reading component of 
this project, which is intended to promote discussion about the forms of 
violence in our community. Scheduled for May 2010, Stories will feature 
programs and activities sponsored by multiple community businesses 
and organizations. 

The library has been participating in the Downtown Economic 
Development Initiative, with a primary focus on marketing. As an 
anchor building on Main Street, the library has a stake in the vitality of 
the business district. 

To keep in touch with the public schools, the library director com- 
pleted terms of service on the Wakefield High School Council and is cur- 
rently a member of the Dolbeare School Council. 

Most library users are aware of the extensive resource-sharing net- 
works to which local libraries belong. These require the participation of 
member libraries. Currently, the North of Boston Library Exchange is 
participating in a multi-network grant to investigate the replacement of 
propriety software with open source software. The library director is 
serving on a System Review Committee that examines the probable 
impact on circulation policies and procedures. 

The library is administering its fourth grant in three years. Grants 
have dual value. Obviously, they are a source of funds for new initiatives. 
But, of equal value, grants typically require considerable staff training 
and development. The Youth Room is to be commended for taking on 
three grants that enhance the library's ability to provide core services 
like early literacy training and constructive recreational opportunities 
for middle schoolers. 

The most recent grant provides video gaming equipment and 
instruction. This initiative called for new consideration of the role of 
gaming in the context of the library's mission. 

Perhaps the easiest starting point is the familiar concept of board 
games in public libraries. What were we expecting to accomplish by pro- 
viding, first checkers and chess, then a venue for Dungeons and 
Dragons? The library was an acceptable setting for the forerunners of 
video games. It wasn't deemed necessary to demonstrate that playing 
actually accomplished anything. 

More broadly, the library encourages both hobbies and social inter- 
action by providing information, sponsoring programs, and making space 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 101 



available to community groups. Patrons have never been required to jus- 
tify their interests. 

Having said that, there is a case to be made that even simple social 
activities like karaoke and Dance Dance Revolution have redeeming fea- 
tures. They require literacy itself, skills that accompany literacy - pat- 
tern recognition, rhythm and rhyme - and socialization. 

Strategy gamers apply all kinds of skills in the quest to become more 
expert at their chosen games - practice, planning, risk assessment, and 
problem-solving among them. Additionally, the social interaction that 
occurs around gaming includes writing, most often in electronic forums. 
Along with the competition, there is a culture of sharing and self-expres- 
sion that requires organizing and explaining information. 

Millenials live in a digital world. To some of us, it's invisible or even 
a trifle suspect. But the Northeast Massachusetts Regional Library Sys- 
tem informs us that the average age of the gamer is thirty-three and ris- 
ing, so the e.e. cummings approach to this alternate reality may be 
instructive - 

listen: there's a hell of a good universe next door; let's go. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Sharon A. Gilley 
Library Director 

Assistant Director and Head of Public Service 

Volunteers 

Once again the library benefited from many hours of volunteer ser- 
vice from the community. The library's largest group of volunteers, the 
Friends of Beebe Library, held several successful fundraisers during 
2009. Their annual book sale and membership drive enabled them to 
fund "extras" for the library, such as museum passes, the museum pass 
reservation software, and children's and adult programming. 

A group of human resource employees from Comverse devoted an 
afternoon to sprucing up the Avon Street entrance. They solicited dona- 
tions of plants from local nurseries, planted them, and spread mulch 
around the gardens on Avon Street. Their efforts resulted in a lovely 
entrance way to the library. 

Individual volunteers also contributed a great deal of time and ener- 
gy to the library. They mended books, delivered materials to homebound 
patrons, dusted shelves, organized non-fiction books, weeded, and shov- 
eled. Thank you. 



102 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Personnel 

Budget cuts required the library to change the closing time from 
9:00 to 8:00 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Part time employees had 
their hours reduced. Last year the library laid off a half-time Reference 
Librarian. 

Jan Shaw retired on February 26 after working at the library for 
forty-two years. Long time custodian Patrick O'Leary resigned on Octo- 
ber 8. At the start of 2010, two librarians announced their retirement. 

Programs and Events 

In addition to providing literary, art, crafts, and music enrichment, 
the library's adult programs reflected economic and environmental 
issues of 2009. 

In January, Lisa Wessan, a motivational coach and speaker, pre- 
sented Let Go & Lighten Up. Ms. Wessan explained the physiological, 
psychological, and spiritual benefits of laughter. 

In March, the library partnered with the Wakefield Chamber of 
Commerce to produce a Blossoms at the Beebe weekend for a second year. 
The successful Saturday evening event attracted over 400 people for a 
wine tasting, flower show, and silent auction. On Sunday, The Savings 
Bank sponsored the library's Family Day. Normal library services were 
available, an arts and crafts program for children was held in the after- 
noon, and local businesses such as Albion Beads, Sew Trendy, and Kid- 
casso exhibited their creations. The community enjoyed lovely floral 
arrangements and arts and crafts exhibitions during a unique Sunday 
afternoon experience. 

The library collaborated with Wakefield Climate Action Project 
WCAP to host a "green" series. In March, R. Carter Scott presented 
Green Power for the Home. The program focused on new construction and 
cost efficient methods to build green. In May, Peter Dion, manager of 
Wakefield Municipal Gas & Light Department, gave an interesting talk 
on where Wakefield gets its power. In June, Mark Hanson, an MIT engi- 
neer, discussed Reducing Home Energy Consumption. The library appre- 
ciated the chance to work with a local organization to bring topical pro- 
grams to the community. 

Job hunting was a dominant topic of 2009. In April and May, Wake- 
field resident and career coach Julie Bernardin presented three work- 
shops to seventy-five enthusiastic job seekers. The workshops focused on 
resumes, networking, and maintaining momentum during a long job 
search. In December, professional recruiter Ellen Gallant offered 
insights into what makes a resume successful. As with all programs at 
the library, workshops were free of charge. 

The library applied for and received a Picturing America grant from 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 103 



the National Endowment for the Humanities. The grant provided posters 
of American art and crafts. In July, Laura-Marie Small of Kidcasso 
developed three adult programs showcasing American artists Joseph 
Stella, Romare Beardon, and Norman Rockwell. 

The fall season began in September with Solar Made Simple, a pro- 
gram that enumerated the benefits of solar energy - even in New Eng- 
land. Sisters In Crime authors Toni Kelner, Clea Simon, and Hank 
Phillippi Ryan showed aspiring writers how to use personal experiences 
in a mystery story. October showcased music, with a program to intro- 
duce neophytes to opera. John Tischio, President of the New England 
Opera Club, shared his passion for opera on a rainy Saturday afternoon. 
Later that month, Roald Wilson in Recital impressed an audience with 
his performance on piano and various unusual instruments in his collec- 
tion. 

November focused on holiday preparation. Linda Mattson, owner of 
Given-Erwin Florist, demonstrated floral arranging techniques. Wake- 
fieldian Pat Weisenbach conducted a scrapbooking workshop in which 
participants created a photo album or a series of five holiday cards. An 
attendee evaluated the program as exceeding expectations and comment- 
ed, "Fun interactive programs with a product at the end are great! 
Thanks for sponsoring." 

To end the year, Jeff Shmase from Eagle Educational Consulting 
presented The Recession and What It Means for Your College Bound Stu- 
dents. The program dovetailed with financial aid programs hosted by 
Wakefield Memorial High School in December. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Laura Zalewski 
Assistant Director 

Readers' and Information Services 

The number of reference transactions increased considerably in 
2009, probably due in part to the general increase in demand for library 
services during hard economic times. Reference questions increased fif- 
teen percent over the previous year. The department handles requests by 
phone, fax, or in person, and also by electronic mail at email@wake- 
fieldlibrary.org. 

The library's web site www.wakefieldlibrary.org provides conve- 
nient access to information about library programs and services. The site 
is maintained by library staff with assistance from NOBLE. Visits to the 
site were up 75% over the previous year. In the library, use of the wire- 
less network remained extremely popular. Wakefield's wireless users 



104 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



accounted for a disproportionate share of wi-fi logins throughout the 
NOBLE network, almost twenty percent. The weekly online newsletter 
of events now has over 1,400 subscribers. Patrons can subscribe and 
unsubscribe by visiting the library's web site. The library established a 
Facebook page this year, using the popular social networking site as a 
free way to publicize library news and events. The page now has almost 
300 Facebook "fans" who keep up to date on library happenings. 

Wakefield is fortunate to benefit from state and regional funding for 
many online research databases, available at workstations throughout 
the library and also from home. Unfortunately, due to state budget cuts, 
the popular EBSCO Literary Reference Center had to be discontinued, 
but other resources remained available for the entire year. 

The library finished its first full year of the popular OverDrive ser- 
vice which provides access to almost a thousand downloadable audio 
books. Patrons can transfer books to portable devices like MP3 players 
or iPods. Wakefield patrons were among the highest users of the service 
in the NOBLE network. 

A new enhancement was added to the library's online catalog in late 
spring. LibraryThing is a social book and reading site that provides 
aggregated content. When searching for a book, patrons now find lists of 
alternative editions large print, audiobooks, etc., subject tags to supple- 
ment the library headings, and recommendations for similar books. 

Reference and youth services librarians coordinated with school per- 
sonnel to promote summer reading to Wakefield High School students. 
In addition to the popular annual displays of books, librarians visited 55 
classes to talk about books with 950 students. 

The library won four awards this year in the biennial Massachusetts 
Library Association Public Relations awards contest: 2nd place for Event 
The Blossoms at the Beebe party, 2nd place for News Coverage, 3rd 
place for Media Presentation (the digital sign purchased with a grant 
from Alcoa), and Honorable Mention for the new web site. Staff also con- 
ducted ongoing adult programs such as book discussion groups (Books by 
the Lake, Supper Sleuths, and the Senior Center Book Discussion 
Group), the French conversation group (now approaching its 10th 
anniversary) and internet tutorial sessions. Librarian Leane Ellis con- 
ducted numerous continuing education workshops on readers' advisory 
skills and strategies for helping connect people with books they'll love. 

A number of local history projects preserve and provide better access 
to Wakefield materials. The image collections are now included in both 
the NOBLE Digital Library, available at www.noblenet.org, and the 
Massachusetts Digital Commonwealth, which collects historical images 
from around the state and provides a single search interface at 
www.digitalcommonwealth.org. They are also conveniently collected 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 105 



on the library's own web site in the "About Wakefield" section. 

Wakipedia, the online encyclopedia of articles on current and his- 
toric Wakefield topics, now has more than eighty articles and is still 
growing. The searchable online index of Wakefield death records has 
been completed back to 1921, with more than 21,500 listings. The library 
uses Flickr, the popular photo sharing web site, to publicize not only his- 
toric images but also current photos of library programs and displays. 
The library received some generous donations of historic images this 
year: a collection of photographs documenting the demolition of the Old 
Town Hall at the corner of Main and Water Streets in 1958, and photos 
from a scrapbook of the Beebe Farm on Main Street overlooking Lake 
Quannapowitt. Librarians also worked with a scholar of early New Eng- 
land gravestones who is researching a second book on the subject and is 
incorporating a number of examples from the Old Burying Ground on 
Church Street. New and established businesses sought historical images 
for decorative use in their workplaces. 

The library added twenty-six of the most useful local history books 
to the online Internet Archive, a non-profit organization founded in 1996 
to create a digital library for future historians as well as current users. 
The archive currently contains over a million books, plus extensive col- 
lections of media such as newsreels, advertising, cartoons, music, radio 
shows, and more. Materials in the archive, most published prior to the 
1920s, are in the public domain and can be used without restrictions. 
Boston Public Library is one of the participating scanning facilities, and 
they did the actual work of scanning and indexing Wakefield's titles, 
which are now keyword searchable on Beebe Library's web site. 

Librarian Beth Radcliffe continued to coordinate sixteen generous 
volunteers of the Homebound Delivery Program who take library materi- 
als to ill or disabled residents. Please contact the Reference Department 
if you or someone you know could benefit from this service. 

In addition to their routine reference duties, Reference Department 
staff actively participated in network and regional committees, and 
attended and conducted workshops on a range of professional issues. 

Respectfully submitted, 
Jeffrey M. Klapes 
Head of Reference and Information Services 

Youth Services 

The Youth Services Department implemented two mini-grants 
awarded to the library in 2009. The Mother Goose on the Loose grant 
provided staff training to implement an award-winning story program 



106 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



proven to improve preschoolers' early learning skills. The EqualAccess 
grant provided funding from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to 
reach out to middle school students. 

Mother Goose on the Loose 

Beebe Library has a unique role in preparing Wakefield's children to 
arrive at kindergarten ready to learn to read. 

Children's librarians implemented a nationally acclaimed story time 
program for preschool children called Mother Goose on the Loose 
MGOL. Grant components included adopting the MGOL format in the 
library's preschool programming, outreach to the community and 
preschools, and workshops for parents and preschool teachers. 

In October 2008, library staff underwent training with Dr. Betsy 
Diamant-Cohen, who created and branded Mother Goose on the Loose. 
The program format incorporates music, movement, interactive and sen- 
sory games, storytelling, nursery rhymes, and poetry, along with tradi- 
tional books. Dr. Diamant-Cohen created the program to develop pre-lit- 
eracy skills in children under two years of age, but the format is adapt- 
able for all ages. 

The first MGOL story time series took place in January 2009. Par- 
ents remarked on how well the lively format engaged their children. The 
interactive program received high praise that has not subsided since. 

In February, the demand for story times increased, reflecting what 
libraries throughout the Commonwealth had been reporting since 
November 2008. Economic conditions and job loss resulted in more resi- 
dents requesting story times, as at-home parents sought quality activi- 
ties with their children. To meet the demand, the library offered drop-in 
story times throughout the spring and summer and increased the num- 
ber of story time terms in fall 2009. 

The library launched several outreach initiatives. In January, 180 
new parents received postcards notifying them that New Baby Kits 
awaited them at the library. Kits include a board book, pamphlets on 
early literacy activities for babies, a "Born to Read" bib, and story time 
information. The library mailed invitations again in July. Healthy Fam- 
ilies, a division of Hallmark Health that provides support services to 
first-time parents aged twenty and under, also distributed kits to their 
clients. 

The library collaborated with the Art Department at Wakefield High 
School to produce a televised story time to air on Cable Access Televi- 
sion. Volunteer Missy Thomson coordinated this project, and Jon Berecz 
of Wakefield High School produced Mother Goose on the Loose, which 
aired on the high school's channel. This program reached Wakefield's 
8,910 cable subscribers and contiguous towns served by Comcast. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 107 



In March, librarians sent a letter to Wakefield preschools explaining 
the grant and the new story time program. Tall Spire, Odyssey 
Preschool, KinderCare, and Children's Center of Wakefield invited 
librarians to demonstrate the MGOL format. 

Librarians produced a full-color brochure, Early Literacy and 
Preschool Services, that suggested activities to nurture language and lit- 
eracy skills in toddlers. Staff distributed the brochures to local daycare 
centers, through the New Baby Kits, and at the Childcare Expo hosted 
by the Child Care Circuit in November. 

Finally, the grant also provided educational programs to the commu- 
nity. The library presented three workshops for parents and educators. 
Melrose Children's Librarian Marianne Stanton presented How to Raise 
a Reader, a workshop targeting early learning skills and relating them to 
reading tastes from infancy to kindergarten. In another program, certi- 
fied music therapist Meredith Pizzi demonstrated how music helps chil- 
dren acquire language skills and develop an interest in stories. Carol 
Hartery, an early childhood educator and instructor, led a make-and- 
take workshop for adults to make aids that fortify emergent literacy 
skills. 

Overall, patrons participating in MGOL story times rated the pro- 
gram as highly valuable. Parents became more aware of their children's 
language development and retention of the songs, rhymes, and stories. 
Many noted increases in their children's vocabulary, storytelling capabil- 
ities, and socialization skills during the story time term. 

Young Adult Grants 

Beebe Library strives to engage Wakefield's youth in meaningful 
after-school activities. 

The EqualAccess grant funded activities and equipment for young 
people in middle and high school, encouraging them to take part in their 
library and community. Library staff attended a two-day workshop that 
provided training in forming a Teen Advisory Board, identifying commu- 
nity needs, and providing programs. 

The Teen Advisory Board identifies activities that engage young 
people, advises librarians on gaming equipment, and publicizes activities 
for young adults. The library staff and Galvin Middle School teachers 
identified a core group of students to serve on the Advisory Board. Over 
twenty middle school students attended the initial meeting in September 
2008, then volunteered for subcommittee work, most of which took place 
during 2009. 

The Gaming Subcommittee specified the must-have purchases. The 
staff established a gaming collection to be used in-house for library pro- 
grams, and a core collection to be borrowed. Three televisions, media 



108 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



storage cases, Wii, PlayStation, and Xbox platforms were purchased. 
The library also purchased five Nintendo handhelds and games that cir- 
culated to patrons while they visited the library. 

The Events Subcommittee conducted programs that included a 
karaoke party, a board games day, candy sushi, a duct tape craft pro- 
gram, and video gaming days that featured the recently acquired equip- 
ment and games. Gaming Days met with so much success that in Sep- 
tember 2009 the library implemented a weekly Video Gaming Day on 
Wednesdays after school. This program series continues into 2010. 

The MySpace Committee collaborated to provide teens with a 
MySpace page for Advisory Board updates and library activities 
www.myspace.com/beebelibrary. The committee met several times 
throughout the year to update content. 

In July 2009, the library won a second grant for Tweens and Teens 
from the Massachusetts Board of Library Commissioners. The award is 
for $20,000 over two years to build on the programs begun in the 
EqualAccess grant. Tweens and Teens took a three-prong approach to 
services. The first goal was to update the Young Adult Area with new 
furnishings and display space that markets the YA collection. The sec- 
ond goal was to staff the Homework Center with volunteers providing 
free homework assistance to students, and to upgrade the Center's books 
and study aids. The final goal of the grant was to provide more technolo- 
gy for students - laptops that can access the wireless network and graph- 
ic tablets for creating original artwork. 

The Advisory Board added new members to give a voice to the 
incoming fifth-graders. In addition to ongoing Gaming Days, this year's 
board held a Halloween party, complete with a Candy Sushi bar, a scav- 
enger hunt, and a karaoke party. 

LSTA grants do more than infuse money into the library budget. 
They move library services forward to meet the changing needs of young 
people in a changing world. Grants sustain libraries in their role of 
being neither home nor school, but unique community service providers 
to young people. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Nancy Sheehan 

Head of Children's Services 

Technical Services 

Technology 

Beebe Library provides thirty-eight computers, a microfilm scanner, 
and five network printers for public use. The Technical Services depart- 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 109 



ment manages the library's computer network, providing upgrades and 
troubleshooting throughout the year. In the past year, the department 
also provided the following enhancements to the library's computer net- 
work. 

The library now has an Internet connection to Comcast. NOBLE, the 
library consortium of which Beebe Library is a member, added a busi- 
ness class Comcast account for libraries with the most Internet traffic. 
The Comcast network provides a significantly higher bandwidth than 
the one previously provided by NOBLE, resulting in better response 
time. 

The library upgraded its file server and network software this past 
year. The upgrade required new skills for all users, including a new 
method of backing up file server data, and learning new methods to trou- 
bleshoot public computers. The department worked hard to ensure that 
all computers had the same or improved functionality, and that public 
and staff computers were still secure. 

There were several hardware upgrades throughout the year, includ- 
ing the conversion of two catalog computers to full access Internet com- 
puters in the Young Adult area, an installation of two ultra small form 
computers at the Circulation Desk, and the replacement of two network 
printers. 

The department recycles library printer cartridges through a compa- 
ny that awards points towards new equipment. This past year, the 
library invited the public to donate used printer cartridges and cell 
phones. 

Technical Services 

The Technical Services department is responsible for ordering, 
tracking, receiving, processing, cataloging, and entering computer data 
for all new library materials. The department instituted new methods 
for processing materials, including the relocation of the barcode to the 
front cover of materials, at the request of the Northeast Massachusetts 
Regional Library System NMRLS. This standardized placement is a 
first step towards an automated delivery system and a simplified inven- 
tory procedure. 

The library added three new types of materials to its collections: 
Playaways MP3 players that contain one audio book, video games, and 
video game players. The department established procedures for order- 
ing, cataloging, and circulation. 

Magazine Collection 

The Technical Services department manages the library's magazine 
and newspaper collections. To assess how the magazine collection is 



110 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



being used, the department conducts a magazine survey each year and 
examines circulation to determine which titles should be discontinued. 

Obsolete magazines are donated to the Friends of Beebe Library, for 
whom the department organizes the annual magazine giveaway each 
January. Patrons are invited to take old magazines and encouraged to 
make donations to the Friends. 

The department also manages the gift magazine program which will 
celebrate its twenty year anniversary in 2010. This past year, fifty indi- 
viduals and organizations donated nearly forty subscriptions. A link to a 
list of gift magazines can be found at 
http://www.wakefieldlibrary.org/gift-magazine-list. To see all the maga- 
zines that the library subscribes to, go to 
http://www.wakefieldlibrary.org/magazine-list on the library's website. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Rebecca Rohr 

Head of Technical Services 

Library Statistics 



Resources 




Print Collections 




Hardback Volumes 


101,976 


Paperback Volumes 


10,025 


Periodical Titles 


185 


Multimedia Collections 




Audio Books on Cassette 


397 


Audio Books on CD 


1,054 


Audio Books on Playaways 


10 


Downloadable Audio Books 


1,004 


CD-ROMs 


185 


Compact Discs 


2,360 


DVDs 


4,454 


Mixed Media Kits 


131 


Videocassettes 


169 


Video Games 


30 


Graphic & Digital Collections 




Artwork 


42 


Digital Images 


1,874 


Maps 


104 


Microfilm Reels 


1,628 


Photographs 


55 


Postcards 


63 


Museum Memberships 


14 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



111 



Circulation 




Books 


233,678 


Periodicals 


5026 


Media 


55,756 


Museum Passes 


1,476 


Total 


295,934 


Daily Average 


980 






Reference 




Directional Questions 


7,115 


Reference Questions 


32,162 


Total 


39,277 


Interlibrary Loans to Wakefield 


24,701 


Interlibrary Loans from Wakefield 


20,636 


Documents Notarized 


340 


Documents/Pages Faxed 


894 


Visits to Library Web Site 


147,444 


Wireless logins 


5,948 


Subscribers to email newsletter 


1,435 






Program Participation 




Adult Services 




Book Discussions 


29 


Book Discussion Participants 


356 


Programs 


73 


Program Participants 


838 


Online Catalog & Internet 
Tutorials 


8 


Tutorial Participants 


8 


Children's Services 




Story Hours 


220 


Story Hour Participants 


4,870 


Children's Programs 


48 


Children's Program Participants 


1,661 


Summer Reading Program 
Registrants 


753 


Summer Programs 


49 


Summer Program Participants 


1,825 


Young Adult Programs 


32 


Young Adult Program Participants 


365 


Class Visits to the Library 





Classes Visited by Librarians 


65 



112 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Meeting Room Reservations 


581 






Patron Traffic 


312,496 


Daily Average 


1,035 






Volunteers 




Homebound Delivery Patrons 


16 


Homebound Volunteers 


16 


General Library Volunteers 


16 


Volunteer Hours 


2,478 



Report of the Northeast 

Metropolitan Regional Vocational 

High School District 

OUTSTANDING STUDENT AWARD 

Douglas Serafim from Saugus, a student in the Drafting & Design 
program, was chosen as Northeast's nominee at the State Awards Din- 
ner for Outstanding Vocational Technical Students. The event is co- 
sponsored by the Massachusetts Association of Vocational Administra- 
tors and the Massachusetts Vocational Association. 

NATIONAL TECHNICAL HONOR SOCIETY 

The Northeast Chapter of the National Technical Honor Society held 
its annual Induction Ceremony in March. At the ceremony, 14 seniors 
and 27 juniors were inducted. These students joined the previously 
inducted members to bring the Technical Honor Society Chapter to 81 
members for the 2008-2009 school year. 

NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

The Annual Induction Ceremony to the Northeast Chapter of the 
National Honor Society "Artisans" was held in March. At the ceremony 
9 seniors, 9 juniors were inducted for the 2008-2009 school year bringing 
the total membership to 58. 

SKILLS/USA AWARDS 

Robert Mirabello of Saugus was the winner of the Gold Medal in 
Architectural Drafting at the State Skills/USA competition. 
STUDENT ADVISORY REP TO THE SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

Aida Pena, a senior from Revere elected as the Student Representa- 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 113 



tive to the School Committee for the 2008-09 school year. 

SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE 

The Northeast Awards and Scholarship Committee presented 
awards and scholarships to 73 deserving students at the Ninth Annual 
Senior Recognition Night. A total of $30,050 was presented to Northeast 
students who will be working in their vocational field, entering trade 
apprentice programs, or going on to one, two, or four-year programs at 
accredited colleges, universities, and trade schools. These awards and 
scholarships provide the students the opportunities to purchase tools and 
equipment, as well as to assist in offsetting the expenses of educational 
institutions. 

PEER MEDIATION PROGRAM 

Our Northeast Peer Mediation Center continues to help reduce prob- 
lems at Northeast. The mediation process is successful in resolving con- 
flicts concerning rumors, threats, name-calling, teasing, harassment, 
hazing, and physical fights. Northeast has a full-time coordinator and 39 
trained junior and senior peer mediators. A trained mediator is a neu- 
tral person not involved in the dispute and through the mediation 
process, helps people come to their own agreement about how they want 
to resolve their conflict. 

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 
Plan Development 

The Professional Development Subcommittee of the Perkins/Title I 
Local Plan Committee gives direction to the District for the planning of 
professional development activities. This Subcommittee ensures that 
planned activities focus on the district goals and priorities. The members 
of this subcommittee are academic and career/technical teachers and 
counselors, serve as the "High School That Work" Leadership Team, and 
report to the District Administrator responsible for professional develop- 
ment. They assist in the coordination and evaluation of these activities, 
aligning available professional development resources with district goals, 
and serve as a resource for the School Council for the development of the 
School Improvement Plan. 

In an effort to promote professional learning that is both relevant 
and sustained, this Subcommittee reviews professional development 
models and activities recommended by the other Subcommittees of the 
Local Plan, the HSTW State Coordinator and the National Staff Devel- 
opment Council. Priority is given to professional development activities 
that address the needs identified by the core indicator data. Plan devel- 
opment priorities include: 



114 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



• Coordinating a professional development program that meets 
the needs of both beginning and veteran teachers and empha- 
sizes content-based offerings while addressing the topics of 
teaching to your strengths, parental concerns, special education 
issues, English language leaner strategies, classroom manage- 
ment techniques, and other effective practices that improve stu- 
dent learning and achievement. 

• Pursuing models for delivering professional development to best 

accomplish plan priorities, 

• Fostering a professional learning community that encourages 
teachers to work together, eliminates barriers to common plan- 
ning time, and encourages educators to solicit feedback from 
each other to improve their practices, 

• Exploring activities that increase school-wide teacher knowl- 
edge of the educational activities occurring in each department 
within the school. 

The Subcommittee evaluates the success of their actions by evaluat- 
ing the products and deliverables created during the professional learn- 
ing activities, by evaluating the impact of the professional development 
activities on the core indicators for each subgroup and special population 
addressed, and by analyzing the follow-up data collected from teacher 
surveys, especially the HSTW survey. 

Plan Structure for 2008-2009 
Goals: 

• Establish an on-line option for professional learning that will 
allow for increased availability and variety of topics. 

• Increase the technology skill level of the staff. 

• Provide strategies to improve student learning and achieve- 
ment. 

• Provide information on laboratory safety. 
Activities: 

• X2 training for Rank Book, Attendance and Progress Reports. 

• Introduction to the "Knowledge Delivery System KDS of on- 
line professional development. Topics: 

"What Great Teachers Do Differently" 

"Strategies to Reduce Classroom Disruptions" 

"Homework Practices and Polices That Work" 

"Interactive Learning and Text Adaptation for ELL Students" 

"Dealing With Difficult Parents" 

• Small learning group meetings during half-day professional 
development sessions to discuss KDS topics and share practices 
and policies. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 115 



• "High Schools That Work" Leadership Team participation in 
national conferences: "Getting More High School Students to 
Achieve at Higher Levels", "High-Quality Career Technical Pro- 
grams", and "Quality Teaching: Research-Based Strategies That 
Work". 

• Presentation: "The Power of I" and "Re-Do" - HSTW presenter 
Toni Eubanks. 

• Presentation: "Laboratory Health and Safety" - The Laboratory 
Safety Institute 

• "High Schools That Work" Summer Conference -Atlanta. 

Summer Transition Program: 

It was our pleasure to serve 217 members of the Class of 2013 as 
part of the ninth season of the Summer Transition Program. This 
number represents nearly two-thirds of the incoming class! These incom- 
ing ninth graders participated in both academic and career/technical pro- 
grams. In mathematics, they focused on solving problems through the 
use of graphing calculators. In English language arts, the focus was on 
writing autobiographical essays, poetry, and other writing assignments 
dealing with social issues. The career/technical areas explored by the 
students included: 

Automotive Technology Auto Body Baking 

Cosmetology Design & Visual Drafting & Design 

Graphics Electrical Culinary Arts 

The Career Center offered our new students an opportunity to eval- 
uate their interests, skills and work values on the Kuder website. This 
information, along with discussions on the Exploratory Program and 
shop selection process, encouraged students to begin evaluating their 
career options. The English language arts classes continued use of the 
web-based essay writing program called "Writing Roadmap" to assist 
students with their essay writing assignments. Students also had a 
chance to pilot the use of "Skills Tutor", an on-line web-based MCAS 
preparation and tutorial program. As in the past, an English immersion 
program was also conducted to assist second language students in transi- 
tioning from middle school to our career/technical high school. 

Funding for these programs was provided by the Federal legislation 
of Title 1, Special Education, Title V, and the Carl D. Perkins Occupa- 
tional Education grants. 

Summer Enrichment Program: 

Approximately 70 students from grades 10, 11 and 12 participated 



116 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



in the Summer Enrichment Program. This program offers support to 
those students needing additional review in preparation for their MCAS 
retest. This year, we also offered support to those students entering 
grade ten seeking additional assistance in preparing for their first 
attempt on the tenth grade MCAS during the upcoming school year. 

Students were engaged in MCAS mathematics, science and English 
language arts preparation. These students received extensive training on 
the new "Skills Tutor" website. Funding for this program was provided 
by the Academic Support Department of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education. 

Best wishes to students enrolled in both programs for a successful 
2009-10 school year. 

SUPPORT SERVICES 

The Northeast Student Services staff offers support and counseling 
to all students through individual and group counseling, specialized 
workshops and presentations, health services, and mediation services. 
All faculty guidance counselors are certified as School Adjustment Coun- 
selors five and are qualified to handle the wide range of student issues. 
One School Adjustment Counselor is bilingual Spanish-speaking. The 
Freshman School Adjustment Counselor works to establish a positive 
transition from the special education program, provides psychological 
testing, and maintains a small individual and group caseload. Two 
Career Counselors and a Career Teacher provide career awareness and 
career development services to all students. The Career Counselors pro- 
vide specialized support to students enrolled in non-traditional vocation- 
al areas. Two School Nurses provide health services and a Peer Media- 
tion Coordinator implements a Peer Mediation Program. 

Support groups are established each year based on student needs. 
Groups for pregnant and parenting teens, grieving students, Latino stu- 
dents, Asian students, gay/lesbian students and others have all been 
offered at different times depending on need and student interest. An 
anger management group is offered by the School Psychologist in an 
effort to provide students with the ability to understand and manage 
anger appropriately. 

The School Adjustment Counselors provide individual counseling 
support and crisis intervention to all students as needed. They will pro- 
vide support to homeless students, assessing their special needs and 
coordinating with the Homeless Liaison (Administrator of Student Ser- 
vices). They also are responsible for developing and monitoring Section 
504 Accommodation Plans in conjunction with the Administrator of Stu- 
dent Services. Individual counseling with student requires that School 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 117 



Adjustment Counselors collaborate with family members, doctors, psy- 
chiatrists, outside therapists, social workers, police and court personnel, 
and others. 

A specific linkage is established with Riverside Community Care in 
Wakefield to coordinate with a Bridging the Gap grant that brings an 
outside therapist to Northeast one morning per week. The goal is to 
assist students and families to establish counseling linkages outside of 
school. In addition, Tri-City Mental Health Services of Maiden serves as 
our crisis intervention linkage for emergency mental health services in 
the community. 

The Bilingual School Adjustment Counselor provides native lan- 
guage support Spanish as needed to limited English proficient students 
and families across all issues. She provides specific support to the Eng- 
lish Language Education program at Northeast, but supports other 
Northeast Latino students and families as needed. Translation services 
oral and written and interpreting services are often required for parent 
communication throughout the building, and as needed, this counselor 
coordinates with all departments to assist. Referrals are made to a 
Spanish-speaking Psychologist for testing as needed for Special Educa- 
tion evaluation. 

The School Psychologist supports the counseling staff on a consulta- 
tion basis and works directly with the Special Education Department to 
assess all students in need of evaluation. The Psychologist also serves as 
a consultant to the Administration and to the teaching faculty regarding 
at-risk students, assisting with crisis intervention services and offering 
individual and group counseling and support on an as needed basis. 

Career counseling and the college application process are a large 
part of all of the counselors' roles. All counselors offer College/career 
planning evenings to junior and senior parents. In addition, two Career 
Counselors and a Career Teacher provide specialized support. The newly 
developed Career Center is the focal area for a well-planned four-year 
career development program that prepares all Northeast students for 
their individually chosen career paths. The curriculum focuses on career 
assessment; career information and requirements; employability and 
entrepreneurial skills; interviewing skills; portfolios; and resume prepa- 
ration. By providing assessments to evaluate skills, interests, and work 
values, the Career Counselors work with the School Adjustment Coun- 
selors to assist freshmen in their vocational selection process and upper 
class students with linkages to post-secondary education and employ- 
ment opportunities. 

The Career Counselors provide directed support to those students 
who are enrolled in career areas that are considered non-traditional for 
their gender. Students have the opportunity to participate in support 



1 18 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



groups, specialized presentations, and field trips that prepare them to 
understand the benefits of non-traditional choices, to manage challenges 
in each occupation and to understand the required post-secondary link- 
ages to achieve their goals. 

The School Nurses have coordinated support services for pregnant 
and parenting teens with outside providers affiliated with local hospitals. 
In addition, they provide support to students with chronic medical condi- 
tions, coordinating with parents, doctors, nurses, etc. The School Nurses 
work closely with the School Adjustment Counselors to coordinate assis- 
tance when mental health needs arise. They also work closely with the 
Deans when emergency medical evaluations are required. 

The Peer Mediation Coordinator at Northeast operates a Peer Medi- 
ation Program where upper class students undergo twenty hours of spe- 
cialized training in mediation skills and implement a program to work 
out arising conflicts between students. This is a very positive prevention 
program that contributes to the development of a positive school climate 
as students learn to come to their own agreements about how to solve 
their conflict. 

In addition to the support provided by the counseling staff, the Spe- 
cial Education Department offers a TEAM meeting process that pro- 
motes monitoring of student progress and educational support. Each 
Special Education student is assigned a Liaison who is a teacher in the 
Special Education Department who oversees progress in relation to the 
Individual Education Program, communicating with parents, teachers, 
and counselors to help all students achieve success. 

The KICK-OFF Mentoring Program is a freshmen transition pro- 
gram coordinated by the Career Counselors that matches junior and 
senior mentors with small groups of freshmen students. 

The KICK-OFF Mentors run the Freshmen Orientation day for 
freshmen and then meet with their groups throughout the year to offer 
support and to deliver positive lessons that promote a positive school cli- 
mate. The mentors are trained in a leadership climate by the student 
services staff, developing a core of approximately 140 peer leaders from 
11th and 12th grades. 

The Peer Tutoring program provides educational assistance to stu- 
dents having difficulty with one or more academic subjects. Students 
who have been successful in specific subject areas and who have partici- 
pated in training, volunteer their time to assist others in the library one 
afternoon per week. The tutoring program is designed to supplement 
after school assistance provided by the academic and vocational teachers. 
The program benefits go beyond the student achievement as the relation- 
ships formed by the tutors and students help to break down barriers 
between different grade and age groups and develop friendships that 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 119 



would not have had a chance to form. A math teacher with other teach- 
ers offering support and assistance coordinates the Peer tutoring pro- 
gram. 

Special school-wide workshops and presentations are offered 
through the year for different groups of students. Each year, all fresh- 
men participate in-group workshops focusing on harassment and bully- 
ing and gender equity issues. Large group assemblies and presentations 
have been offered focusing on goal setting and acts of kindness, sub- 
stance abuse, teen dating issues, tolerance character building, and oth- 
ers. Different groups in the building such as SADD have sponsored 
workshops. 

On a larger scale, the student service emphasis is on communication 
- communication with students and with parents. Mid-term progress 
reports are sent to parents each quarter and report cards are sent home 
four times per year. E-mail communication is welcomed and progress 
update meetings are 

held as needed. Parents are asked to be involved with all class schedul- 
ing activities. Post-graduate planning information is shared through 
career assessment and planning activities. Career Plans are sent home 
annually for parent review. Language development is communicated for 
limited-English 

proficient students through assessment data and parent meetings. It is 
our goal to service all students equitably while attending specifically to 
those who have specific life challenges. 

Grants received in FY 2009: 

Perkins Act Allocation Grant Program - Secondary 

The purpose of this federal grant program is to assist school districts 
in improving secondary programs that meet the definition of career and 
technical education under the Carl D. Perkins Career and Technical 
Education Improvement Act of 2006 P.L. 109-270 Perkins IV. Perkins 
IV allocation funds must be used in accordance with Perkins IV and the 
Manual. Required and permissive allocation fund uses are identified in 
the Massachusetts Perkins IV Manual. A portion of allocation funds 
must be used for professional development. 

Title I, Part A 

Title I, as reauthorized under the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, 
provides resources to local school districts to assist low achieving stu- 
dents in high poverty schools to meet the state's challenging academic 
standards. Funds may be used to provide academic, instructional, and 
support services for eligible students, professional development activities 
for staff, support for parent involvement activities, and the purchase of 



120 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



appropriate supplies and materials. The priorities of Title I are to 
strengthen the core programs in schools and provide academic and/or 
support services to low achieving students at the preschool, elementary, 
middle, and high school levels in support of NCLB goals; provide pro- 
grams based on scientifically-based research that enable participating 
students to achieve the learning standards of the state curriculum 
frameworks; elevate significantly the quality of instruction by providing 
staff with substantial opportunities for professional development; and 
involve parents in the development of and participation in the program, 
activities, and procedures for parents and students to improve student 
achievement. 

Title II, Part A: Improving Educator Quality 

The purpose of this federal grant program is to increase student 
achievement through comprehensive district initiatives that focus on the 
preparation, training, recruitment, and retention of highly qualified edu- 
cators. These initiatives should be aligned with Massachusetts' reform 
efforts and should help districts meet the NCLB goals and requirements 
for highly qualified teachers, instructional paraprofessionals in Title I 
targeted assistance and school wide programs, and high-quality profes- 
sional development. The goal is to improve the overall quality of all edu- 
cators, including administrators, within the district. 

Title II, Part D: Enhancing Education Through Technology 

Title II Part D: This federal grant program is intended to help school 
districts improve student achievement through the use of technology in 
their schools; and encourages high-quality professional development that 
uses research-based instructional strategies to integrate technology 
effectively into the instruction. At least 25% of the grant funds must be 
used for ongoing high-quality technology professional development for 
teachers, principals, administrators, and school library media personnel 
to further the use of technology in the classroom or library media cen- 
ters. Other uses of grant funding include allowing school districts to par- 
ticipate in Mass ONE online professional development and using tech- 
nology effectively to increase communication with parents and promote 
parental involvement. 

Academic Support Services Allocation Grant-*Summer 

The goal of this state-funded grant program is to enhance academic 
support services needed to meet the Competency Determination required 
for high school graduation for students in the Classes of 2003-2011 who 
have performed in the warning/failing Level 1 or needs improvement 
Level 2 categories on their most recent English language arts and/or 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 121 



mathematics MCAS or re-tests. Summer programs may serve students 
in the Class of 2012 transitioning into high school who have scored at 
Levels 1 and/or 2 on their most recent English language arts and/or 
mathematics MCAS. These services are to supplement currently funded 
local, state, and federal programs. (Level 1 on the MCAS tests 
warning/failing category = score of less than 220. Level 2 on the MCAS 
tests needs improvement category = score between 220 and 238. The 
other two MCAS categories are Level 3 Proficient with a score between 
240-258 and Level 4 (Advanced) with a score between 260-280.) 

Summer Academic Support Enhancement Grant 

To develop and pilot Educational Proficiency Plans EPPs for stu- 
dents in Classes of 2010-2012 who have not scored at the proficiency lev- 
el on their most recent ELA and/or mathematics MCAS. The purpose of 
these state supplementary summer programs is to enhance academic 
support in English language arts ELA and mathematics for students in 
the classes of 2010-2012 who have not scored at the proficiency level on 
their most recent ELA and/or mathematics MCAS, in order to help these 
students meet the Competency Determination for a high school diploma. 
Programs will create, modify, or use existing career/college models that 
address the requirements of the Educational Proficiency Plan EPP for 
students in the Classes of 2010-2012 and beyond and pilot these tem- 
plates with eligible students. 

Federal Special Education Entitlement 

The purpose of this federal entitlement grant program is to provide 
funds to ensure that eligible students with disabilities receive a free and 
appropriate public education that includes special education and related 
services designed to meet their individual needs. The priority is to serve 
eligible students with special education services and activities deemed 
essential for student success in school. Services and activities must 
ensure compliance with state special education laws and regulations and 
the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act - 2004 IDEA-2004. 

Special Education - Program Improvement 

The purpose of this federal grant program is to fund professional 
development activities that will help to improve the skills and capacity of 
educators to meet the diverse needs of students with disabilities. The pri- 
orities of this grant program are to advance the skills of educators 
involved with students with disabilities through high quality, sustained, 
and intensive professional development activities and through district- 
based induction and mentoring programs 
Safe Schools Program for Gay and Lesbian Students - Round 2 



122 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



The purpose of this state-funded grant program is assist schools in 
developing violence prevention programs to enhance school safety for gay 
and lesbian students consistent with the Education Reform Act and the 
Board of Education's 1993 Recommendations on the Support and Safety 
of Gay and Lesbian Students. These recommendations include: establish- 
ing local non-discrimination policies; offering teacher training on violence 
and suicide prevention; forming gay/straight support groups; and extend- 
ing school-based counseling services to family members of gay and les- 
bian students. 

SUMMER PROGRAMS 

Northeast Metro Tech Summer Programs enjoyed another success- 
ful campaign since its inception in 1988. Over the years both the Sum- 
mer School and Computer Program have experienced remarkable 
growth. This year the summer programs serviced nearly 400 students 
combined. 

The Northeast Summer School serviced high school students in six 
different academic areas including Math, Science, English, Social Stud- 
ies, Language, and Vocational Related. The goals of promoting a positive 
learning atmosphere, retention, and promotion, as well as providing 
skills to assist each student at the next grade level are paramount objec- 
tives behind the philosophical make-up of our summer school. 

Our summer program also continued to expand into the vocational 
enrichment and certification program areas, including Dental Assisting, 
Dental Radiology, and Basic Welding. These programs were not only 
extremely successful, but gave both students and adults an opportunity 
to explore and begin new careers. 

The popular Northeast Summer Computer Program completed a 
successful 20th year. Its objective of making learning fun had the coun- 
selors teach the participants skills that they can use during their school 
year while enjoying doing it. These programs can help strengthen read- 
ing and math skills, and expand their general knowledge of the comput- 
er. Continued use of "Smart Board" technology along with some out- 
standing Power Point presentations were an exciting part of this year's 
computer program, along with swimming and diving instruction. 

COMMUNITY EDUCATION PROGRAM 

The Community Education Program is a broad base collaborative 
community initiative assisting learners of all kinds complete their educa- 
tion and achieve economic self-sufficiency through empowerment skills, 
health care, support services and meaningful employment. 

Our vision is to deliver educational experience in a positive environ- 
ment that will enable Northeast to reach new heights together with our 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 123 



lifelong learning community. 

The focus of the Community Education Program is to offer programs 
that meet the demands of our learning populations. In doing this we 
give people the opportunity to improve employment skills, fulfill life long 
goals, or enrich their lives with social activities. With the most qualified 
instructors, and state of the art labs Northeast strives to maintain the 
highest standards of education. During the summer of 2009 emphasis 
was placed on technology upgrades such as brochure modification, new 
state of the art web site construction, and the introduction of new pro- 
grams. 

2009 GRADUATES 

The 2008-09 school year represents the thirty-seventh class to 
matriculate at Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational School. 
Northeast graduated 274 students in the class of 2009. Breakdown of 
graduates' status after graduation is as follows: 

Employed 82 Attending 4 year college 81 * 

Entering Military Service 13 Attending 2 year college 80 * 

Other 2 Apprentice school 16 * 

It should be noted that 65% of the graduating class went on to 
further their education either in a two or four year college or in 
an apprentice program. 272 members of the graduating class 
either entered military service are employed or seeking further 
education, that figure represents 99% of the class of 2009. 

SPECIAL NEEDS ENROLLMENT 

Special Needs enrollment for the 2008-09 school year continued to 
represent a fair share of the total school enrollment with students. The 
330 Special Needs students represent 26% of the school population. 

DISTRICT SCHOOL COMMITTEE ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

At the Annual Organizational Meeting of the District School Com- 
mittee on January 8, 2009 the following members were re-elected Offi- 
cers of the Northeast District School Committee: 

Chairman Michael T. Wall, of Chelsea 

Vice Chairman Henry A. Hooton, of Melrose 
Secretary Peter A. Rossetti, Jr. of Saugus 

Treasurer Paul L. Sweeney of North Reading 

Assoc. Treasurer Anthony E. DeTeso of Stoneham 
CONCLUSION 

As Northeast celebrates its fortieth year of Vocational/Technical 



124 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Excellence to its twelve member communities, its aim is to continue to 
offer the latest in vocational/technical and academic education by main- 
taining a high level of performance. This high level of performance also 
encompasses continued improvement in academic achievement with 
regard to MCAS. The Northeast Class of 2009 had a 99% pass rate of 
the MCAS Test by graduation. Northeast is continually updating cur- 
riculum and continues to offer MCAS Enrichment Classes for those stu- 
dents in need of additional preparation for the MCAS, which now 
includes Science beginning with the Class of 2010. Northeast also pro- 
vides a Summer Enrichment Program for the incoming freshmen. The 
school continues to offer students the finest education with which to 
build a successful career through the latest in equipment, software and 
technology offered in all vocational programs no matter which career 
path they have chosen. 

The Career Center which was added last year is where students 
have access to laptops to develop career plans, learn of all business 
aspects of their industries, prepare comprehensive portfolios, resumes, 
and college plans with the assistance of our Career/Guidance Counselors 
has Northeast a step ahead of all other schools in Career Technical Edu- 
cation. 

Evidence of our past success is reflected in the students that have 
graduated from Northeast Metro Tech. The Alumnus stories of success 
and their readiness and willingness to help school officials by speaking at 
recruiting sessions at the local schools as well as recruiting graduates for 
employment is proof of their dedication to Northeast. Northeast current- 
ly has 20 alumni employed at the school. Testimonials as to the success 
of our graduates continue to be received, which makes us proud to have 
contributed in some small way to their accomplishments. 

Once again, I am proud to have represented Wakefield as a member 
of the Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational District School Com- 
mittee not only to serve as the guardian of funds allocated from the com- 
munity to this educational institution, but also to assist in and provide 
counsel to the school in maintaining the highest standards of educational 
excellence possible. 



Respectfully submitted, 
Vincent J. Carisella 
Northeast School Committee 
Wakefield, Representative 



Report of the Municipal 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



125 



NORTHEAST METROPOLITAN REGIONAL VOCATIONAL 

SCHOOL 



ENROLLMENT HISTORY 



CITY/TOWN 


S.Y. 


S.Y. 


S.Y. 


S.Y. 


S.Y. 


DISTRICT 


05-06 


06-07 


07-08 


08-09 


09-10 


Chelsea 


221 


203 


198 


206 


190 


Maiden 


215 


238 


234 


222 


216 


Melrose 


56 


64 


64 


48 


45 


North Reading 


28 


40 


38 


37 


37 


Reading 


19 


26 


26 


26 


28 


Revere 


241 


242 


238 


244 


238 


Saugus 


146 


137 


138 


161 


174 


Stoneham 


34 


46 


44 


46 


52' 


Wakefield 


59 


65 


61 


84 


91 


Winchester 


7 


9 


9 


7 


11 


Winthrop 


41 


45 


44 


55 


65 


Woburn 


99 


97 


97 


70 


59 


TOTALS 


1166 


1212 


1191 


1206 


1206 


NON DISTRICT 


43 


47 


53 


39 


42 


GRAND TOTAL 


1209 


1259 


1244 


1245 


1248 



SPED ENROLLMENT 320 342 



333 



323 



330 



SPED ENROLLMENT 26% 27% 27% 



26% 26% 



NORTHEAST COMPARISON OF ASSESSMENTS 

BUDGET BUDGET VARIANCE VARIANCE 
FY2008 FY2009 $ % 

GROSS BUDGET $18,347,926 $19,937,541 $1,589,615 8.66% 
LESS REVENUES 

Chapter 70 Aid $7,065,299 $7,766,451 $701,152 9.92% 
E&D - $300,000 $300,000 3000.00% 

Transportation $580,932 $736,262 $155,330 26.74% 

Total Revenues $7,646,231 $8,802,713 $1,156,482 15.12% 

Net Assessments 10,701,695 $11,134,828 $433,133 4.05% 



CHELSEA 
MALDEN 



$684,019 $735,495 $51,476 7.53% 

$1,530,571 $1,466,650 ($63,921) -4.18% 



126 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



MELROSE 


$759,570 


$819,540 


$59,970 


7.90% 


NO. READING 


$450,535 


$398,445 


($52,090) 


-11.56% 


READING 


$295,877 


$391,688 


$95,811 


32.38% 


REVERE 


$1,738,097 


$1,829,999 


$91,902 


5.29% 


SAUGUS 


$1,864,020 


$2,027,147 


$163,127 


8.75% 


STONEHAM 


$592,087 


$632,978 


$40,891 


6.91% 


WAKEFIELD 


$837,872 


$975,387 


$137,515 


16.41% 


WINCHESTER 


$115,289 


$79,903 


($35,386) 


-30.69% 


WINTHROP 


$477,299 


$569,241 


$91,942 


19.26% 


WOBURN 


$1,356,459 


$1,208,355 


($148,104) 


-10.92% 


TOTAL 


$10,701,695 


$11,134,828 


$433,133 


4.05% 


STUDENTS STUDENTS 


PERCENT OF 




FY2008 


FY2009 VARIANCE CONTRIBUTION 


CHELSEA 


203 


205 2 


16.998342% 


MALDEN 


238 


218 -20 


18.076285% 


MELROSE 


64 


68 4 


5.638474% 


NO. READING 


40 


34 -6 


2.819237% 


READING 


26 


33 7 


2.736318% 


REVERE 


242 


242 


20.066335% 


SAUGUS 


137 


145 8 


12.023217% 


STONEHAM 


46 


46 


3.814262% 


WAKEFIELD 


65 


72 7 


5.970149% 


WINCHESTER 


9 


6 -3 


0.497512% 


WINTHROP 


45 


51 6 


4.228856% 


WOBURN 


97 


86 -11 


7.131012% 


TOTAL 


1212 


1206 -6 


] 


100.00% 



Northeast Combined Balance Sheet - 

All Fund Types and Account Groups 

June 30, 2009 

Fiduciary Account 

Governmental Fund Types Fund Type Groups 



Assets 

Cash 



Special Trust and General 
General Revenue Agency Fixed Assets 



$2,265,269 $379,828 $99,647 



$ 



Accounts Receivable 326,183 
Fixed Assets - 



6,651,101 



Total Assets 



$2,591,452 $ 379,828 $ 99,647 $ 6,651,101 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 127 



Liabilities 






Accounts Payable 


$ 196,300 


$ 155,262 


Deferred Revenue 


20,202 


150,908 


Claims Incurred 






Not Reported 


- 


- 


Accrued Salary 


929,741 


- 


Accrued Sick and 






Vacation 


248,247 


- 



448,762 



Total Liabilities $1394,490 $306,170 $448,762 : 

Fund Equity 

Investment in General 

Fixed Assets $ $ - $ $6,651,101 

Fund Balances: 

Reserve for 
Encumbrances 330,342 - 

Reserve for Insurance - - (498,436) 

Undesignated 866,620 73,658 149,321 : 



Total Fund Equity 1.196,962 73,658 (349,115) 6,651.101 

Total Liabilities & 
Fund Equity $ 2,591,452 $ 379,828 $ 99,647 $6,651,101 



Northeast Special Revenue Funds 
June 30, 2009 



Undesignated Fund Balance 


Amount 


Adult Education 


$(34,348) 


Building Usage 


108,201 


Athletics 


5,617 


Grants 


4,335 


Cafeteria 


(56,001) 


Auto Body 


5,745 


Auto Tech 


2,689 


Shining Knights 


1,914 


Day Care 


28,517 


Culinary 


4,205 



128 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Cosmetology 5,269 

Graphics (2,963) 

Carpentry (198) 

Metal Fabrication 676 

Total $73,658 

Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational School District 
Trust and Agency Fund 
June 30, 2009 

Undesignated Fund Balance A mount 

Student Activity $ 101,643 

Scholarship 47,678 

Total $ 149,321 



Municipal 
Gas & Light 
Department 



Report of 



MUNICIPAL GAS & 
LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



130 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Report of the Municipal Gas and 
Light Department 

To the Citizens of the Town of Wakefield: 

Our One Hundred Sixteenth Annual Report of the Municipal Gas and 
Light Department covers the fiscal period July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009. 
The total electric sales of the Department totaled 175,657,150 KWH com- 
pared to 181,151,114 KWH the prior year. This approximate 3% drop 
was primarily due to a more temperate summer than in previous years 
and the economic climate. The peak month for electric usage was July 
with 20,095,724 kilowatt hours of energy consumed. The highest single 
day usage was June 10 with 46, 217 KWH consumed. 

Upgrades to a feeder line between the Beebe Substation to the 
McGrail Substation on Wakefield Ave were 60% completed. The Depart- 
ment has continued its review and implementation of a multi-year plan 
to retire most of its older 4,160 volt system and replace it with a 13,800 
volt system which will be more reliable and better equipped for future 
expansion. The department continues to upgrade its overhead and 
underground distribution infrastructure to improve system reliability. 
Upgrades of electrical distribution infrastructure were completed on six 
streets this year. 

Total gas sales reflected a warmer than average heating season as 
496,291 MCF were sold compared to 498,091 MCF in the prior year. The 
effects of a warmer winter were offset by a large number of conversions 
to natural gas. January was the peak month for gas usage with 89,877 
MCF consumed that month. The highest single day usage was on Janu- 
ary 3 with 5,035 MCF consumed. 

The Department continued to increase the portion of gas supply taken 
from the Tenneco Transmission Line through the new meter and regu- 
lating facility. The Department continues to replace old steel and cast 
iron gas mains with modern plastic gas mains, which will ensure a safe 
and reliable gas distribution system. Significant upgrade projects were 
completed on Green Street, Oak Street, Main Street and Salem Street. 

The Department's energy conservation program that combines energy 
audits with rebates for the installation of weatherization material and 
the purchase of energy efficient appliances continues to be popular. 
Three hundred twenty four customers received $12,010 in rebates and 
$23,906 in conservation incentives. This represents a 1.5% increase in 
payouts for the program over the previous year. This program helps our 
customers reduce their gas and electricity use. 

Respectfully submitted, 
WAKEFIELD MUNICIPAL GAS AND LIGHT DEPARTMENT 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 131 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 
MUNICIPAL GAS AND LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF NET ASSETS 

JUNE 30, 2009 



ASSETS 

Current: 
Unrestricted cash $ 680,311 

Restricted cash 2,827,191 

Receivables, net of allowance for uncollectibles 4,253,281 

Insurance receivable 455,735 

Prepaid expenses 5,331,635 

Inventory 481,344 

Noncurrent: 
Capital Assets: 

Land and construction in progress 419,659 

Other capital assets, net of accumulated depreciation 11,302,877 

TOTAL ASSETS 25,752,033 

LIABILITIES 

Current: 

Accounts payable 3,321,230 

Customer deposits 876,078 

Accrued liabilities 367,425 

Noncurrent: 

Accrued liabilities, net of current portion 200,292 

OPEB liability 261,054 



TOTAL LIABILITIES 5,026,079 

NET ASSETS 

Invested in capital assets, net of related debt 1 1 ,722,536 

Restricted for depreciation fund 1 ,62 1 ,63 1 

Unrestricted 7,381,787 



TOTAL NET ASSETS $ 20,725,954 



132 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 
MUNICIPAL GAS AND LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES, AND CHANGES IN FUND NET ASSETS 

JUNE 30, 2009 



Operating Revenues: 

Electric $ 27,799,986 

Gas 11,035,291 



Total Operating Revenues 38,835,277 

Operating Expenses: 

Purchase power 18,849,998 

Gas purchased 6,895,048 

Distribution 3,660,163 

General and administrative 4,512,252 

Depreciation 1,714,688 

Other 317,000 



Total Operating Expenses 35,949,149 

Operating Income 2,886,128 

Nonoperating Revenues (Expenses): 

Payment in lieu of taxes (760,171) 

Interest income 77,619 

Interest expense (26, 1 63) 

Retirement expense (540,437) 

Loss on disposal of fixed assets (363,895) 

Other income 250,294 



Total Nonoperating Revenues (Expenses), Net (1,362,753) 

Change in Net Assets 1 ,523,375 

Net Assets at Beginning of Year 19,202,579 

Net Assets at End of Year $ 20,725,954 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



133 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 
MUNICIPAL GAS AND LIGHT DEPARTMENT 

STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS 

JUNE 30, 2009 



Cash Flows From Operating Activities: 
Receipts from customers and users 
Payments to vendors and employees 

Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities 

Cash Flows From Noncapital Financing Activities: 

Proceeds from customer deposits 

Net Cash (Used For) Noncapital Financing Activities 

Cash Flows From Capital and Related Financing Activities: 
Interest expense 
Disposal of fixed asset 
Acquisition and construction of capital assets 

Net Cash (Used For) Capital and Related Financing Activities 

Cash Flows From Investing Activities: 
Investment income 
Change in restricted cash 

Net Cash (Used For) Investing Activities 

Net Change in Cash and Short-Term Investments 

Cash and Short Term Investments, Beginning of Year 

Cash and Short Term Investments, End of Year 

Reconciliation of Operating Income to Net Cash: 
Operating income (loss) 

Adjustments to reconcile operating income (loss) to net 
cash provided by (used for) operating activities: 
Depreciation 
Changes in assets and liabilities: 

Accounts receivable 

Prepaid expense 

Inventory 

Accounts payable 

Accrued liabilities 

OPEB liability 

Payment in lieu of tax 

Retirement expense 

Other income 



$ 40,867,552 
(39,048,237) 

1,819,315 



52,952 



52,952 



(26,163) 

(384,380) 

(2,078,583) 

(2.489,126) 



97,394 

(1,116,539) 

(1,019,145) 

(1,636,004) 

2,316,315 

680,311 

2,886,128 

1,714,688 

1,520,927 

(2,286,498) 

(55,202) 

(1,041,946) 

(129,522) 

261,054 

(760,171) 

(540,437) 

250,294 



Net Cash Provided By (Used For) Operating Activities 



1,819,315 



Vital 
Statistics 



Reports of 

TOWN CLERK 

Town Meetings 

Voting Results 

Births, Marriages, Deaths 



and Report of 
TOWN TREASURER 



136 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
ATTENDANCE 
April 6, 2009 



Precincts 


7:30 


8:00 


9:00 


10:00 


1 


31 


35 


41 


41 


2 


18 


18 


23 


23 


3 


25 


27 


29 


29 


4 


15 


19 


20 


20 


5 


24 


28 


31 


31 


6 


36 


44 


47 


47 


7 


67 


73 


71 


76 



Total 216 244 266 267 

With 216 Registered Voters in attendance at 7:30 p.m., Moderator 
William Harbison Carroll called the meeting to order in the Galvin Mid- 
dle School Auditorium, 525 Main St., Wakefield. Visitors and non-voters 
were individually introduced. Tellers were selected and duly sworn by 
the Town Clerk. Finance Committee Chairman Daniel W. Sherman 
motioned that the reading of the Warrant, with the exception of the Con- 
stable's Return be dispensed with, which was seconded and so voted. 
The Moderator read the Constable's Return. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 137 



Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to implement collective bargaining agree- 
ments between the Town of Wakefield and the Wakefield Firefighter's 
Union Local 1478 International Association of Firefighters, AFL-CIO for 
the period of July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009, and to provide therefore that 
the Town raise and appropriate or transfer from available funds a suffi- 
cient sum of money to carry out the purposes of this Article, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

BOAKD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman of the Finance 
Committee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Modera- 
tor Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to implement a collective bargaining 
agreement between the Town of Wakefield and the Wakefield Firefight- 
er's Union - Local 1478 for the period of July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009 
and to provide therefor that the Town supplement the Fire Dept. Person- 
al Services account by the transfer from free cash of the sum of 
$98,540.00 and from the account created as a collective bargaining 
reserve by the vote of the Town under Article 2 of the 2008 Annual Town 
Meeting of the sum of $92,337.00 for a total of $190,877.00. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to implement collective bargaining agree- 
ments between the Town of Wakefield and the Massachusetts Coalition 
of Police, Wakefield Division for the period July 1, 2007 to June 30, 2009, 
and to provide therefore that the Town raise and appropriate or transfer 
from available funds a sufficient sum of money to carry out the purposes 
of this Article, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOAED OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to implement Collective Bargaining 



138 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Agreements between the Town of Wakefield and the Massachusetts 
Coalition of Police-Wakefield Division for the period of July 1, 2007 to 
June 30, 2009 and to provide therefor that the Town supplement the 
Police Personal Services account by the transfer from Free Cash of the 
sum of $76,854.00 and from the account created as a collective bargain- 
ing reserve by the vote of the Town under Article 2 of the 2008 Annual 
Town Meeting of the sum of $66,865.00 for a total of $143,719.00. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 3 

To determine how much money the Town will raise and appropriate 
for General Government, Protection of Persons and Property, Human 
Services, Public Works, Public Service Enterprises, Education, Unclassi- 
fied, Benefits & Administration, Interest and Maturing Debt and Light 
Department, specifying what appropriation shall be taken from the 
receipts of a department. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 
VOTED: That the Town vote to raise and appropriate from tax levy or 
transfer from available funds the sums of money as detailed in the fol- 
lowing recommendations for the fiscal year July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 
the grand total amounting to $65,044,095.00 The Finance Committee's 
motion will provide for the breakdown of this amount and the sources 
thereof in the various classifications as described in the Finance Com- 
mittee Report. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the General 
Government portion of Article 3 as follows: 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $242,143.00 

Contractual Services 42,980.00 

Materials and Supplies 450.00 

TOTAL $285,573.00 

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $210,279.00 

Contractual Services 66,300.00 

Materials and Supplies 2,400.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 139 



Sundry Charges 210.00 

TOTAL $279,189.00 

DATA PROCESSING DEPAETMENT: 

Personal Services $170,946.00 

Contractual Services 71,621.00 

Materials and Supplies 6,200.00 

Sundry Charges 650.00 

TOTAL $249,417.00 

TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary of Treasurer $49,958.00 

Personal Services 81,669.00 

Contractual Services 6,500.00 

Materials and Supplies 650.00 

Sundry Charges 290.00 

Tax Titles 7,000.00 

Bank Charges 8.500.00 

TOTAL $153,567.00 

LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $83,908.00 

Contractual Services 38,450.00 

Materials and Supplies 5,600.00 

Sundry Charges 0.00 

Legal Damages 4.560.00 

TOTAL $132,518.00 

COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary of Collector $71,298.00 

Personal Services 60,436.00 

Contractual Services 32,715.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,873.00 

Sundry Charges 140.00 



140 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



TOTAL $186,462.00 

ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $161,842.00 

Contractual Services 17,150.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,700,00 

Sundry Charges 525.00 

TOTAL $181,217.00 

TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary of Town Clerk $65,462.00 

Personal Services 80,061.00 

Contractual Services 15,000.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,300.00 

Sundry Charges 150.00 

TOTAL $161,973.00 

ELECTION AND REGISTRATION: 

Personal Services $20,900.00 

Contractual Services 15,250.00 

Materials and Supplies 475.00 

TOTAL $36,625.00 

ELECTION EXPENSE: 

Personal Services $8,432.00 

Contractual Services 6.350.00 

TOTAL $14,782.00 

FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Personal Services $2,800.00 

Contractual Services 3,300.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,000.00 

Sundry Charges 2.760.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 141 



TOTAL $9,860.00 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 

Personal Services $32,639.00 

Contractual Services 3,450.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,000.00 

Sundry Charges 650.00 

TOTAL $37,739.00 

LESS: Wetland Filing Fees $6,027.00 

TOTAL $31,712.00 

PLANNING BOARD: 

Personal Services $3,000.00 

Contractual Services 4,225.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,600.00 

Sundry Charges 125.00 

TOTAL $8,950.00 

BOARD OF APPEALS: 

Contractual Services $13.300.00 

TOTAL $13,300.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $1,745,145.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $6,027.00 

TOTAL FOR GENERAL GOVERNMENT: $1.751.172.00 

3.17% 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they recommended Favorable Action, Mod- 
erator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,751,172.00 for General Government, and to provide therefor that the 
sum of $6,027.00 be appropriated by transfer from the Wetlands Protec- 
tion Act Filing Fees Account to the Conservation Commission Contractu- 



142 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



al Services Account, and the sum of $1,745,145.00 be raised and appro- 
priated from tax levy as stated in the recommendation book. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Protection 
of Persons and Property portion of Article 3 as follows: 

PROTECTION OF PERSONS AND PROPERTY 

POLICE DEPAKTMENT: 

Personal Services $3,583,497.00 

Contractual Services 112,789.00 

Materials and Supplies 146,067.00 

Sundry Charges 7.400.00 

TOTAL $3,849,753.00 

FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $3,063,713.00 

Contractual Services 56,000.00 

Materials and Supplies 84,800.00 

Sundry Charges 750.00 

TOTAL $3,205,263.00 

FIRE ALARM. POLICE SIGNALS 
AND TRAFFIC LIGHTS: 

Personal Services $37,000.00 

Contractual Services 6,500.00 

Materials and Supplies 6.500.00 

TOTAL $50,000.00 

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 

Contractual Services $8,500.00 

Materials and Supplies 3.500.00 

TOTAL $12,000.00 

BUILDING DEPARTMENT: 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 143 



Personal Services $160,108.00 

Contractual Services 8,250.00 

Materials and Supplies 3,300.00 

Sundry Charges 400.00 

TOTAL $172,058.00 

SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES: 

Personal Services $5,202.00 

Contractual Services 300.00 

Materials and Supplies 250.00 

Sundry Charges 85.00 

TOTAL $5,837.00 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR: 

Personal Services $47,540.00 

Contractual Services 2,650.00 

Materials and Supplies 2,365.00 

Sundry Charges 3.000.00 

TOTAL $55,555.00 

PARKING CLERK: 

Personal Services $11,715.00 

Contractual Services 8,425.00 

Materials and Supplies 50.00 

TOTAL $20,190.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $7,370,656.00 

TOTAL FOR PROTECTION OF 

PERSONS AND PROPERTY: $7.370.656.00 

13.27% 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 



144 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 

of $7,370,656.00 for Protection of Persons & Property as stated in the 
recommendation book. 

Town Administrator Stephen P, Maio presented the Human 
Services portion of Article 3 as follows: 

HUMAN SERVICES 

COUNCIL ON AGING: 

Personal Services $149,687.00 

Contractual Services 5,800.00 

Materials and Supplies 9,600.00 

Mystic Valley Elder Services 6.275.00 

TOTAL $171,362.00 

HEALTH DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $99,408.00 

Contractual Services 13,520.00 

Materials and Supplies 2,295.00 

Sundry Charges 200.00 

EMARC 16,000.00 

Mental Outpatient Clinic 6,400.00 

E. Middlesex Mosq. 17.420.00 

TOTAL $155,243.00 

VETERANS' DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $9,752.00 

Recipients 47,500.00 

Contractual Services 725.00 

Materials and Supplies 250.00 

Memorial Day 2,500.00 

Veteran's Day 300.00 

TOTAL $61,027.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $387,632.00 

TOTAL FOR HUMAN SERVICES: $387.632.00 

0.70% 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 145 



On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $387,632.00 for Human Services as stated in the recommendation 
book. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Public 
Works budget portion of Article 3 as follows: 

PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT 

PERSONAL SERVICES: 

Personal Services Breakdown: $2,331,481.00 

Administration 112,341.00 

Engineering 142,150.00 

Fleet Maintenance 229,183.00 

Buildings 431,457.00 

Forestry and Parks 573,416.00 

Cemetery 190,680.00 

Highway 707.676.00 

TOTAL $2,386,903.00 

LESS: 
Perpetual Care Income $16,447.00 

Park Trust Funds Available 85.00 

To Be Appropriated From The 

Sale of Lots Funds 38.890.00 

TOTAL $2,331,481.00 

CONTRACTUAL SERVICES: 

Contractual Services Breakdown: $625,105.00 

Administration 11,700.00 

Engineering 7,450.00 

Fleet Maintenance 41,210.00 

Buildings 355,822.00 



146 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Forestry and Parks 81,823.00 

Cemetery 4,150.00 

Highway 122.950.00 

TOTAL $625,105.00 

MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES: 

Materials & Supplies Breakdown: $470,705.00 

Administration 7,100.00 

Engineering 5,300.00 

Fleet Maintenance 184,608.00 

Buildings 75,012.00 

Forestry and Parks 81,560.00 

Cemetery 13,525.00 

Highway 103.600.00 

TOTAL $470,705.00 

SUNDRY CHARGES: 

Sundry Charges Breakdown: $2,200.00 



Administration 


630.00 


Engineering 


400.00 


Fleet Maintenance 


250.00 


Buildings 


465.00 


Forestry and Parks 


230.00 


Cemetery 


75.00 


Highway 


150.00 


TOTAL 


$2,200.00 


SNOW AND ICE: 


$343,250.00 


PUBLIC WORKS (Exclusive of 




Enterprise Funds. Water & 




Sewer Divisions) 




TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: 


$3,772,741.00 


TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: 


$55,422.00 


TOTAL FOR PUBLIC WORKS: 


$3,828,163.00 




6.92% 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 147 



On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$3,828,163.00 for Public Works and to provide therefor that: 

the sum of $55,422.00 be appropriated by transfer to the Public Works 
Personal Servcies Account from the following accounts: 

Perpetual care Income $16,447.00; Park Trust Funds Available $85.00; 
Sale of Lots Funds $38,890.00 and the sum of $3,772,741.00 be raised 
and appropriated from tax levy as stated in the recommendation book. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Public 
Works Enterprise Department portion of Article 3 as follows: 

PUBLIC WORKS ENTERPRISE DEPARTMENTS 

WATER DIVISION: 

Personal Services $733,036.00 

Contractual Services 282,583.00 

Materials and Supplies 186,608.00 

Sundry Charges 1,430.00 

Professional Medical Services 325.00 

Contributory Retire. Pensions 96,427.00 

Group Insurance 259,252.00 

Workers' Compensation Ins. 12,100.00 

General Insurance 16,000.00 

MWRA Water Assessment 1,417,508.00 

Tax Collector P. S. 18,155.00 

Maturing Debt 119,809.00 

Medicare 10.942.00 

TOTAL $3,154,175.00 

SEWER DIVISION: 

Personal Services $522,964.00 

Contractual Services 180,590.00 

Materials and Supplies 56,367.00 

Sundry Charges 600.00 

MWRA Sewer Assessment 5,014,327.00 

Workers' Compensation Ins. 6.500.00 



148 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



General Insurance 9.000.00 

Professional Medical-Services 325.00 

Contributory Retire. Pensions 77,764.00 

Group Insurance 163,443.00 

Tax Collector P.S, 18,155.00 

Maturing Debt 299,487.00 

Medicare 7.852.00 

TOTAL $6,357,374.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $0.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $9.511.549.00 
WATER & SEWER REV RECEIPTS 

TOTAL FOR PUBLIC WORKS 

ENTERPRISE FUNDS: $9,511,549.00 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion car- 
ries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$9,511,549.00 for Public Works Enterprise departments; and to provide 
therefor that: 

the sum of $3,154,175.00 be appropriated by transfer from the Water 
Surplus Revenue Account to the various Water Division budget accounts 
listed in the Finance Committee recommendation book; and 

the sum of $6,357,374.00 be appropriated by transfer from the Sewer 
Surplus Revenue Account to the various Sewer Division budget accounts 
listed in the Finance Committee recommendation book. 

School Supt. Joan Landers presented the School Department 
budget portion of Article 3 as follows: 

SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $21,265,696.00 

Materials and Supplies 1,087,541.00 

Contractual Services 3,891,797.00 

Sundry Charges 22.825.00 

TOTAL $26,267,859.00 

LESS: Available Funds-Offset Receipts 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 149 



Bus Fees $85.000.00 

TOTAL $26,182,859.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $26,182,859.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $85,000.00 

TOTAL FOR SCHOOL: $26.267.859.00 

47.51% 

On the motion of Supt. Joan Landers, which was seconded, 
and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Committee advising 
that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll declared 
that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$26,267,859.00 for the School Department and that the sum of $85,000 
be appropriated by the transfer to the School Department Contractual 
Services-Bus Transportation Allocation from the Offset Receipts 2010 
Bus Transportation User Fees and that the sum of $26,182,859.00 be 
raised and appropriated from the tax levy. The total recommendation for 
the School Department is $26,267,859.00. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Library 
budget portion of Article 3 as follows: 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services $863,423.00 

Contractual Services 195,695.00 

Materials and Supplies 65,976.00 

TOTAL $1,124,994.00 

LESS: 

Library Trust Fund Income 

Available $27,984.00 

TOTAL $1,097,010.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $1,097,010.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $27,984.00 



150 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



TOTAL FOR LIBRARY: 1.124.994.00 

2.03% 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they had voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,124,994.00 for the Library Department and to provide therefor that 
the sum of $27,984.00 be appropriated by transfer to the Library Materi- 
als and Supplies Account from the Library Trust Fund Income available 
and the sum of $1,097,010.00 be raised and appropriated from the tax 
levy as stated in the recommendation book. 

At 8:00 p.m. Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio motioned to 
adjourn the Annual Town Meeting until the Special Town Meet- 
ing is completed, which was seconded. 

Moderator William Harbison Carroll Presented Article 1 of the 
Special Town Meeting: 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to reduce the budget for the School Depart- 
ment for Fiscal Year 2009, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion car- 
ries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to reduce the sum of $228,582.00 from 
the amount to be raised and appropriated from the tax levy for Fiscal 
Year 2009 under Article 3 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to reduce the amount appropriated under 
Article 3 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting, or to see what the Town will 
do about it. 

CAPITAL OUTLAY COMMITTEE 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 151 



On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio. which 
was seconded, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion car- 
ries . 

VOTED: That the Town vote to reduce the sum of $228,582.00 from 
the amount to be raised and approppriated from the tax levy for Fiscal 
Year 2009 under Article 3 of the 2008 Annual Town Meeting. 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws by adding as 
§115-2 of the Code of the Town the following: 

"§115-2. IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE TRENCH SAFETY 
LAW. 

"For purposes of implementing G.L. C. 82A, 'Excavation and Trench 
Safety,' and the regulations promulgated thereunder, 520 CMR 
14.00, as the same may be amended from time to time, permits for 
trench excavation may be issued and decisions concerning the sus- 
pension or revocation of such permits and the shutting down of 
trench sites may be made by a board consisting of the Director of 
Public Works or his designee, the Building Inspector or his designee, 
the Health Director or his designee, the Fire Chief or his designee, 
and the Police Chief or his designee. The said board may delegate 
the issuance of permits to the Department of Public Works and may 
charge a fee for such permits as set forth in § 119-4 of the Code of 
the Town." 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson , which was 
seconded, Moderator William Harbison Carroll declared that the 
"motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to amend the General Bylaws by adding 
as § 115-2 of the Code of the Town the following: 

"§115-2. IMPLEMENTATION OF STATE TRENCH SAFETY 
LAW. 

"For purposes of implementing G.L. C. 82 A, 'Excavation and Trench 
Safety,' and the regulations promulgated thereunder, 520 CMR 
14.00, as the same may be amended from time to time, permits for 
trench excavation may be issued and decisions concerning the sus- 
pension or revocation of such permits and the shutting down of 
trench sites may be made by a board consisting of the Director of 
Public Works or his designee, the Building Inspector or his designee, 



152 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



the Health Director or his designee, the Fire Chief or his designee, 
and the Police Chief or his designee. The said board may delegate 
the issuance of permits to the Department of Public Works and may 
charge a fee for such permits as set forth in § 119-4 of the Code of 
the Town." 

and by adding to § 119-4 of the Code of the Town the following: 

"U. Trench Excavation Permit Fee Under G.L., C. 82A: $100.00" 

and by prescribing the sum of $100.00 as the Trench Excavation Permit 
Fee to be set forth in § 119-4 of the Code of the Town. 

August 17, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the* amendments to the 
Town by-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wake- 
field Special Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009. 

Very truly yours, 
MARTHA COAKLEY, 
ATTORNEY GENERAL 
by: Kelli E. Gunagan, 
Asst. Atty. General 
By-law Coordinator, 
Municipal Law Unit 
1350 Main St., 4th Floor 
Springfield, MA 01103-1629 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept as a gift on behalf of the Town a conveyance from Eric Killorin, 
Trustee of the Geneva H. Killorin Trust, of certain real property consist- 
ing of approximately .547 acres of raw land located on Audubon Road 
and shown as Parcel 41-14-18 on Map 41 of the Assessors' Maps of the 
Town, such real property to be held by the Board of Selectmen for gener- 
al municipal purposes, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and his advising that Favorable Action is recom- 
mended. Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 153 



VOTED: That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept as a gift on behalf of the Town a conveyance from Eric Killorin, 
Trustee of the Geneva H. Killorin Trust, of certain real property consist- 
ing of approximately .547 acres of raw land located on Audubon Road 
and shown as Parcel 41-14-18 on Map 41 of the Assessors' Maps of the 
Town, on such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may deem appro- 
priate, such real property to be held by the Board of Selectmen for gener- 
al municipal purposes. 

At 8:25 p.m. Selectmen Chairman Betsy Sheeran motioned to 
dissolve this Special Town Meeting, which was seconded and so 
voted. 

At 8:26 p.m.. Chairman Sheeran motioned to resume the Annu- 
al Town Meeting, which was seconded and so voted. 



Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Northeast 
Metropolitan Regional School District budget portion of Article 
3 as follows: 

NORTHEAST METROPOLITAN REGIONAL 
VOCATIONAL SCHOOL DISTRICT 

NORTHEAST MET REG. VOC. SCHOOL: $1.062.548.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $1,062,548.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $0.00 

TOTAL FOR NORTHEAST MRVS: $1.062.548.00 

1.92% 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,062,548.00 for the NERVS from the tax levy as outlined in the recom- 
mendation book. 

Furthermore, this vote will authorize the Board of Selectmen to reject 
any susequent budget presented by the NERVS in excess of 
$1,062,548.00 without receiving any additional vote of this body. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Unclassi- 



154 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



fied portion of Article 3 as follows: 

UNCLASSIFIED 

STREET LIGHTS $245,216.00 

MISCELLANEOUS 14,125.00 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 550.00 

GENERAL INSURANCE 285,000.00 

MEDICARE 449,970.00 

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 75,000.00 

RESERVE FUND 250,000.00 

53 RD WEEK 0.00 

TOTAL $1,319,861.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $1,319,861.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $0.00 

TOTAL FOR UNCLASSIFIED: $1.319.861.00 

2.39% 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,319,861.00 from tax levy for Unclassified as stated in the recommen- 
dation book. 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio presented the Benefits 
and Administration portion of Article 3 as follows: 

BENEFITS & ADMINISTRATION 

PERSONAL SERVICES $89,776.00 

PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL 4,568.00 

WORKERS' COMPENSATION 224,000.00 
RETIREMENT SYSTEM: 

Pension Accumulation Fund 2,716,544.00 

Non-Contributory Pension Fund 72,274.00 
Assessments, Non'Contributory 

Veterans Pension Fund 401.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 155 



TOTAL $2,789,219.00 

CONTRIBUTORY GROUP HEALTH 

AND LIFE INSURANCE: 

Town Appropriation $3,291,751.00 

School Appropriation $6,020.347.00 

TOTAL $9,312,098.00 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $12,419,661.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: $0.00 

TOTAL BENEFITS & ADMINISTRATION: $12,419,661.00 

22.46% 

GRAND TOTAL: 

TOTAL FROM TAX LEVY: $55,119,381.00 

TOTAL FROM AVAILABLE FUNDS: 9,685,982.00 

GRAND TOTAL: $64.805.363.00 

100.00% 
NOTE: Departmental percentages do not include the 
Water & Sewer Divisions 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they had voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the sum of $12,419,661.00 be raised and appropriated 
from tax levy for Benefits & Administration as stated in the recommen- 
dation book. 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town transfer the sum of $19,070 from the Light 
Operation Account to the Non-Contributory Veterans' Pension Account; 
and to transfer the sum of $551,852.00 from the Light Operation Account 
to the Contributory Retirement pension Accumulation Fund Account; 



156 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



and to transfer the sum of $921,317.00 from the Light Operation Account 
to the Employees' Group Insurance Account and transfer the sum of 
$61,000.00 from the Light Operation Account to Workers' Compensation 
Insurance Account; and the balance of receipts of the Department from 
July 1, 2009 to June 30, 2010 be appropriated for the use of the Depart- 
ment for other expenditures, provided, however, that if the income from 
said Department shall exceed the expenses of the Department for said 
period of time, the use of the excess, in whole or in part, to be determined 
by the Board of Light Commissioners. 

Presented by Shaun S. Margerison, Chairman, Capital Outlay 
Committee 

V 

ARTICLE 4 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for Capital Outlay as follows, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

CAPITAL OUTLAY COMMITTEE 

On the motion of Shaun S. Margerison, Chairman, Capital Out- 
lay Committee, which was seconded, and after the failure of 
Daniel W. Sherman's amendment to appropriate the full 
$978,536. by a vote of 53-52, Moderator Carroll declared that the 
"motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $494,620.00 and transfer the sum of $115,100.00 from the Water Sur- 
plus Account to the Water Department Capital Outlay Account and the 
sum of $111,589.00 from the Sewer Surplus Account to the Sewer 
Department Capital Outlay Account to carry out the purposes of Article 
4 as outlined in the recommendation book. 

At 10:50 p.m. Selectmen Chairman Betsy Sheeran motioned to 
adjourn this session of the Annual Town Meeting until Monday, 
April 13, 2009 at 7:30 p.m. 

A true copy attest: Mary K. Galvin, Town Clerk 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



157 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

SECOND SESSION 

APRIL 13, 2009 

ATTENDANCE 



Precinct 


7:30 


8:00 


9:00 


10:00 


1 


25 


41 


52 


54 


2 


13 


15 


17 


17 


o 


7 


14 


16 


18 


4 


5 


9 


10 


10 


5 


8 


12 


14 


14 


6 


13 


26 


29 


29 


7 


30 


55 


62 


67 


Total 


101 


172 


200 


209 



With 101 Registered Voters in attendance. Moderator William Harbi- 
son Carroll called the second session of the Annual Town Meeting to 
order in the Galvin Middle School Auditorium, 525 Main St., Wakefield. 



158 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available balances, a sum of money to indemnify certain Police Officers 
& Firefighters of the Town of Wakefield for medical, surgical and hospi- 
talization expenses as a result of injuries received by the officers/fire- 
fighters in the performance of their duties, as provided for under Section 
100, Chapter 41 of Massachusetts General laws, in such amount and to 
such extent as may be recommended by the Board of Selectmen, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town transfer from the Excess & Deficiency 
Account the sum of $2,000.00 to carry out the purpose of Article 5. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for the purpose of managing the popula- 
tion of geese within the Town, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

GOOSE CONTROL COMMITTEE 

On the motion of Bronwyn C. Delia- Volpe, Chair, Goose Con- 
trol Committee, which was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, 
Chairman, Finance Committee advising that they had voted 
Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion 
carries". 

VOTED: That the Town transfer from the Excess & Deficiency 
Account the sum of $12,000. to carry out the purpose of Article 6. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the General Bylaws by adding, 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 159 



as § 154-7 of the Code of the Town, the following: 

"§ 154-7. Public Consumption of Marijuana or Tetrahydro- 
cannabinol 

"A. Public Consumption Forbidden. No person shall smoke, ingest 
or otherwise use or consume marihuana or tetrahydrocannabi- 
nol as the same are defined in G.L. c. 94C, § 1 while in or upon 
any street, sidewalk, public way or other way to which the pub- 
lic has a right of access, playground, beach, schoolhouse, school 
grounds, public building, public parking lot, cemetery or any 
other area either under the control of the Town or open to the 
public, or in or upon any bus or other passenger conveyance 
operated by a common carrier. 

"B. Enforcement. The Police Department shall enforce this Bylaw. 
The fine for violation of this Bylaw shall be three hundred dol- 
lars $300 for each offense. Any violation of this Bylaw may, in 
the sole discretion of the enforcing agent, be made the subject 
matter of noncriminal disposition proceedings commenced by 
such agent under G.L. c. 40, § 2 ID. Any fine imposed hereunder 
shall be in addition to any civil penalty imposed under G.L. c. 
94C, § 32L." 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

POLICE CHIEF RICHARD E. SMITH 

On the motion of Ann McGonigle Santos, Chairperson, Board 
of Health, which was seconded. Moderator Carroll declared that 
the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to amend the General Bylaws by adding, 
as § 154-7 of the Code of the Town/ the following: 

"§ 154-7. Public Consumption of Marijuana or Tetrahydro- 
cannabinol 

"A. Public Consumption Forbidden. No person shall smoke, ingest 
or otherwise use or consume marihuana or tetrahydrocannabi- 
nol as the same are defined in G.L. c. 94C, § 1 while in or upon 
any street, sidewalk, public way or other way to which the pub- 
lic has a right of access, playground, beach, schoolhouse, school 
grounds, public building, public parking lot, cemetery or any 
other area either under the control of the Town or open to the 



160 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



public, or in or upon any bus or other passenger conveyance 
operated by a common carrier. 

"B. Enforcement. The Police Department shall enforce this Bylaw. 
The fine for violation of this Bylaw shall be three hundred dol- 
lars $300 for each offense. Any violation of this Bylaw may, in 
the sole discretion of the enforcing agent, be made the subject 
matter of noncriminal disposition proceedings commenced by 
such agent under G.L. c. 40, § 21D. Any fine imposed hereunder 
shall be in addition to any civil penalty imposed under G.L. c. 
94C, § 32L." 

June 1, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the Amendment to the 
Town by-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wake- 
field Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009. 

Very truly yours, 
Martha Coakley 
Attorney General 
by: Kelli E, Gunagan, Asst, AG 
By-law Coordinator, 
Municipal Law Unit 
1350 Main St., 4th Floor 
Springfield, MA 01103-1629 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept, or take by eminent domain proceedings, conveyances or ease- 
ments from time to time, giving the Town the right to construct and 
maintain drains, sewers, water lines, retaining walls and streets, or to 
see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Attorney Brian McGrail motioned to amend this article, which 
was seconded, and Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion 
carries" as follows: 

To see if the town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
accept, relocate , or take by eminent domain proceedings, conveyances or 
easements from time to time giving the town the right to construct and 
maintain drains, sewers, water lines, retaining walls, sidewalks and 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 161 



streets, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
called for a 2/3 vote which was 121 YES and 1 NO, and declared 
that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to accept, 
relocate, or take by eminent domain proceedings, conveyances or ease- 
ments from time to time, giving the town the right to construct and 
maintain drains, sewers, water lines, retaining walls, sidewalks and 
streets, and to provide therefore that the Town raise and appropriate 
from tax levy the sum of $1.00. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sufficient sum of money for the collection, disposal, 
recycling and composting of refuse, or to see what the Town will do about 
it. 

BOAED OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $1,599,998. for the collection, disposal recycling and composting of 
refuse. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for the implementation of the Town's 
NPDES Storm Water Program, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 



162 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $100,000 to carry out the purpose of Article 10. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 11 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money for the replacement of shade trees, said 
sum to be expended under the direction of the Board of Selectmen,. or to 
see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $8,000 to carry out the purpose of Article 11. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money to conduct a Town Wide Drainage Study, 
or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $55,000 to carry out the purpose of this Article. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 163 



available funds a sum of money to conduct a Town Wide Public Shade 
Tree Spraying Program, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee, advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Car- 
roll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from Tax Levy the sum 
of $20,000. to carry out the purpose of this Article. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 14 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds, a sufficient sum of money for the renovation and repair 
of the Hart's Hill Water Standpipe located on Sidney Street, and to 
determine whether the appropriation shall be raised by borrowing or 
otherwise, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee, advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Car- 
roll explained that this motion would require a 2/3 vote. The vote 
was 116 YES and 8 NO, Moderator Carroll declared that the 
"motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate the sum of $650,000 for the pur- 
pose of renovation and repair of the Hart's Hill Water Standpipe located 
on Sidney Street, including engineering fees and other costs incidental or 
related thereto; and that to raise this appropriation the Treasurer, with 
the approval of the Board of Selectmen, be authorized to borrow, for a 
period of up to 10 ten years, the said sum under and pursuant to Chap - 
ter 44, Section 8 7C of the General Laws, or any other enabling authori - 
ty, and to issue general obligation bonds or notes of the Town therefor, 
payable in the first instance from the Water Enterprise Fund. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 15 

To see if the Town will vote to transfer from the Water Enterprise 



164 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Fund a sufficient sum of money for the Design and Engineering of three 
water booster stations, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town appropriate from the Water Enterprise Fund 
the sum of $250,000 for the design and engineering of three 3 water 
booster stations which will service three high elevation areas located in 
the Montclare area, Lotus/Bonair area and Harts Hill area. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 16 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
lease to the Wakefield Little League Association, for a term of not more 
than ten years and for nominal consideration, and upon other terms 
acceptable to the Board of Selectmen, the field house at the Nasella Play- 
ground on Water Street, being located on Parcel A as shown on Map 17 
of the Wakefield Assessors' Plans, or to see what the Town will do about 
it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio recommending Favorable Action, 
Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to 
the Wakefield Little League Association, for a nominal consideration and 
a term of up to ten years, and upon terms and conditions acceptable to 
the Board of Selectmen, the field house at the Nasella Playground on 
Water Street, being located on a certain parcel of land shown as Parcel A 
on Map 17 of the Wakefield Assessors' Plans. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 17 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
lease to the Wakefield Little League Association, for a nominal consider- 
ation, and upon terms acceptable to the Board of Selectmen, a certain 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 165 



parcel of land containing approximately 102,200 square feet, being Lots 
74, 74F and 74K as shown on Plat 31 of the Wakefield Assessors' Plans 
lying westerly on DelCarmine Street, or to see what the Town will do 
about it. 

WAKEFIELD LITTLE LEAGUE ASSOCIATION, INC. 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio recommending Favorable Action, 
Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to 
the Wakefield Little League Association, for a nominal consideration and 
a term of up to ten years, and upon terms and conditions acceptable to 
the Board of Selectmen, a certain parcel of land containing approximate- 
ly 102,200 square feet, being Lots 74, 74F and 74K as shown on Plat 31 
of the Wakefield Assessors' Plans and lying westerly on DelCarmine 
Street. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 18 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
enter into a lease of the Wakefield Building Trust parking area, so- 
called, with Dover Kline Company, or its assignee, said lease to be self- 
extending from year to year for a period not to exceed ten 10 years, 
unless either party gives written notice of a termination of said lease, or 
see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio recommended Favorable Action, 
Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to renew 
the lease of a certain parking area located at Lots 95 and 96 on Plat 17 of 
the Wakefield Assessors' Maps with the Trustees of 364 Main Street 
Trust, or their assignee, said lease to be self-extending from year to year 
for a period not to exceed ten 10 years, unless either party gives written 
notice of a termination of said lease. 

Presented bv Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 19 



166 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
renew the lease to the Colonel James Hartshorne House Association, 
Incorporated, said lease to be self-extending from year to year for a peri- 
od not to exceed ten 10 years, unless either party gives written notice of 
a termination of said lease, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio's recommendation of Favorable 
Action, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to 
the Colonel James Hartshorne House Association, Inc., for nominal con- 
sideration and upon other terms and conditions acceptable to the Board 
of Selectmen, the land and the buildings thereon known as the 
Hartshorne House on Church Street, said lease to be self-extending from 
year to year for a period not to exceed ten 10 years unless either party 
gives written notice of a termination of said lease. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 20 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
renew the lease to the Crystal Community Club of Lots 8 and 8A of Plat 
30 of the Assessors' Maps, said lease to be self-extending from year to 
year for a period not to exceed ten 10 years, unless either party gives 
written notice of a termination of said lease, or to see what the Town will 
do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio's recommendation of Favorable 
Action, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to 
the Crystal Community Club, Inc., for nominal consideration and upon 
other terms and conditions acceptable to the Board of Selectmen, the 
land and the buildings thereon shown as Lots 8 and 8 A of Plat 30 of the 
Assessors' Maps, said lease to be self-extending from year to year for a 
period not to exceed ten 10 years unless either party gives written 
notice of a termination of said lease. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 21 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 167 



To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
lease the Americal Civic Center to the Americal Civic Center Associa- 
tion, a non-profit corporation organized under Massachusetts General 
Laws, Chapter 180, said lease to be self-extending from year to year for a 
period not to exceed ten 10 years, unless either party gives written 
notice of a termination of said lease, or to see what the Town will do 
about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio's recommendation of Favorable 
Action, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Selectmen to lease to 
the Americal Civic Center Association for nominal consideration and 
upon other terms and conditions acceptable to the Board of Selectmen, 
the land and the buildings thereon known as the Americal Civic Center 
on Main Street, said lease to be self-extending from year to year for a 
period not to exceed ten 10 years unless either party gives written 
notice of a termination of said lease. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 22 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sufficient sum 
of money to pay the rental for the rental year commencing July 1, 2009 
to June 30, 2010 to Wakefield Building Trust for land occupied as a park- 
ing area on Centre Street, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, was 
seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Commit- 
tee advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy the sum 
of $4,760.00 to pay the rental for the rental year commencing July 1, 
2009 to June 30, 2010 to Trustees of 364 Main Street Trust, successors to 
the Wakefield Building Trust, for land occupied as a public parking area 
on Centre Street. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 23 



168 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money to the Capital Projects/Debt Service 
Fund, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

On the motion of Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee, which was seconded, Moderator Carroll declared that the 
"motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town raise and appropriate from tax levy to the 
Capital Projects Fund, also known as the Debt Service Fund, the sum of 
$1,950,000. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 24 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to use 
such sum of the balance of the operating fund of the Municipal Gas and 
Light Department as of June 30, 2009 as the Board of Light Commis- 
sioners may vote, in computing the tax rate for the fiscal period July 1, 
2009 to June 30, 2010, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

MUNICIPAL LIGHT COMMISSIONERS 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P» Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee, advising that they recommended Favorable Action, Mod- 
erator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to 
use such sum of the balance of the Operating Fund of the Municipal Gas 
& Light Department as of June 30, 2009 as the Board of Light Commis- 
sioners may vote, in computing the tax rate for the fiscal period July 1, 
2009 to June 30, 2010. 

At 10:07 p.m. Selectmen Chairman Betsy Sheeran motioned to 
dissolve this Second Session of the Annual Town Meeting until 
Thursday, April 16, 2009, which was seconded and so voted. 

A true copy attest: Mary K. Galvin, Town Clerk 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 169 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
THIRD SESSION 
April 16, 2009 



Precincts 


7:30 


8:00 


9:00 


10:00 


1 


78 


83 


91 


93 


2 


19 


19 


22 


22 


3 


15 


16 


16 


16 


4 


14 


16 


19 


19 


5 


19 


26 


35 


35 


6 


20 


24 


29 


29 


7 


60 


69 


72 


74 



Total 225 253 284 288 

With 225 Registered Voters in attendance, Moderator William Harbi- 
son Carroll called the meeting to order in the Galvin Middle School audi- 
torium, 525 Main St., Wakefield. 



170 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 25 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning map as follows: 

A. Amend the Zoning map by changing the zoning district designa- 
tion of tax map parcels # 2B-005-034A, # 2B-007-032 and # 2B- 
006-033 from Municipal Disposal District to SR Single Resi - 
dence. 

B. Amend the Zoning map by deleting Municipal Disposal District 
from the legend. 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

On the motion of Town Planner Paul Reavis which was sec- 
onded, and Planning Board Chairman Fred Emilianowicz advis- 
ing that the Planning Board voted unanimously to support these 
amendments. Moderator Carroll called for a 2/3 vote which was 
129 YES and 15 NO, and Moderator Carroil declared that the 
"motion carries". 

VOTED: "The Planning Board moves that the Town vote to amend 
the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by amending the Zoning map as follows: 

A. Amend the Zoning map by changing the zoning district designa- 
tion of tax map parcels # 2B-005-034A, # 2B-007-032 and # 2B- 
006-033 from Municipal Disposal District to SR Single Resi - 
dence, and 

B. Amend the Zoning map by deleting 'Municipal Disposal District' 
from the legend." 

June 1, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the amendments to the 
Town by-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wake- 
field Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009, and the map 
pertaining to this article. 

Very truly yours, 

Martha Coakley 

Attorney General 

by: Kelli E. Gunagan, Asst. AG 

By-law Coordinator, 

Municipal Law Unit 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 171 



1350 Main St., 4th Floor 
Springfield, MA 01103-1629 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 26 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning map by adding the following annotation: 

"Floodplain District adopted under Art. 40 of 1994 Annual Town Meet- 
ing is shown on 1988 FIRM Maps on file with the Town Engineer," 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

PLANNING BOARD 

On the motion of Town Planner Paul Reavis, which was sec- 
onded, and Fred Emilianowicz, Chairman, Planning Board 
advising that the Planning Board held a Public Bearing and vot- 
ed unanimously to support this amendment. Moderator Carroll 
called for a 2/3 vote and declared that the "motion carries unani- 
mously". 

VOTED: that the Town vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning map by adding the following annotation: 

"Floodplain District adopted under Art. 40 of 1994 Annual Town Meet- 
ing is shown on 1988 FIRM Maps on file with the Town Engineer." 

June 1, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the amendment to the Town 
by-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wakefield 
Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009, and the map per- 
taining to it. 

Very truly yours, 

Martha Coakley 

Attorney General 

by: Kelli E. Gunagan, Asst. AG 

By-law Coordinator, 

Municipal Law Unit 

1350 Main St., 4th Floor 

Springfield, MA 01103-1629 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 



172 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ARTICLE 27 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
deleting the last sentence from § 190-6. A. 11 such that the said section 
shall read in full as follows: 

"The Municipal District is a special overlay district that regulates 
the use and dimensional requirements of buildings erected on Town- 
owned land." 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

PLANNING BOARD 

On the motion of Town Planner Paul Reavis, which was sec- 
onded, and Fred Emilianowicz, Chairman of the Planning Board 
advising that they held a Public Hearing and voted unanimously 
to support this zoning text amendment. Moderator Carroll called 
for a 2/3 vote, and declared that the "motion carries unanimous- 
ly". 

VOTED: that the Town vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
deleting the last sentence from §190-6. A. 11 such that the said section 
shall read in full as follows: 

"The Municipal District is a special overlay district that regulates 
the use and dimensional requirements of buildings erected on Town- 
owned land." 

June 1, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the amendment to the Town 

by-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wakefield 

Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009. 

Very truly yours, 
Martha Coakley 
Attorney General 
by: Kelli E. Gunagan, Asst. AG 
By-law Coordinator, 
Municipal Law Unit 
1350 Main St., 4th Floor 
Springfield, MA 01103-1629 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 28 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 173 



To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
adopting a new zoning map and amending §190-7.A to read as follows: 

"The above zoning districts are shown on the map entitled 'Wake- 
field Zoning Map prepared by Applied Geographies, Inc., dated April 
6, 2009.' Said zoning map is hereby adopted and declared to be a 
part of this chapter and replaces all previous editions and amend- 
ments of said zoning map." 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

PLANNING BOARD 

Planning Board Chairman Fred Emilianowicz advised that the 
Planning Board had held a Public Hearing on this Article and 
had recommended adoption of the zoning map & amendments. 

Planning Board member Paul R. DiNocco motioned to amend 
this article, which was seconded. Moderator Carroll explained 
that this amendment required a 2/3 vote, and Moderator Carroll 
advised that the "motion carries unanimously". 

The amended article reads as follows: 

ARTICLE 28 

To see if the Town wll vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
adopting a new map and amending §I90»7. A. to read as follows: 

"The above zoning districts are shown on the map entitled 'Wake- 
field Zoning Map prepared by Applied Geographies, Inc., dated April 
6, 2009.' Said zoning map is hereby adopted and declared to be 
apart of this chapter and replaces all previous editions and amend- 
ments of said zoning map." 

or to see what the Town wll do about it. 

Planning Board member Paul R. DiNocco motioned, which 
was seconded and, after calling for 2/3 vote. Moderator Carroll 
advised that the "motion carries, unanimously". 

VOTED: that the Town amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by adopt- 
ing a new zoning map and amending § 190-7. A. to read as follows: 

"Except as set forth below, the above zoning districts are shown on 
the map entitled 'Wakefield Zoning Map prepared by Applied Geo- 
graphies, Inc., dated April 6, 2009.' Said zoning map is hereby adopt- 



174 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ed and declared to be a part of this chapter and replaces all previous 
editions and amendments of said zoning map. 

"The Municipal District is located as shown on a separate map enti- 
tled 'Wakefield Municipal District prepared by Applied Geographies, 
Inc., dated April 6, 2009.' 

"The Wireless Communication Services Overlay District is located as 
shown on a separate map entitled 'Wakefield Wireless Communica- 
tion Services Overlay District prepared by Applied Geographies, 
Inc., dated April 6, 2009.' 

"The Mixed Use Overlay District is located as shown on a separate 
map entitled 'Wakefield Mixed Use Overlay District prepared by 
Applied Geographies, Inc., dated April 6,2009." 

June 1, 2009 

We return with the approval of this Office the amendment to the Town 
by-laws adopted under this Article on the warrant for the Wakefield 
Annual Town Meeting that convened on April 6, 2009 and the map per- 
taining to it. 

Very truly yours, 

Martha Coakley 

Attorney General 

by: Kelli E, Gunagan, Asst. AG 

By-law Coordinator, 

Municipal Law Unit 

1350 Main St., 4th Floor 

Springfield, MA.01103-1629 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 29 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation of 
the residentially-zoned remainder of parcels of land including Tax Map 
Parcels # 41-015-19A/AB "within the bounds described below", # 41-017- 
19D, # 41-019-19B, # 41-020-19C, # 41-022-21A, # 41-023-22BA, and # 
41-025-25D bounded by the western right-of-way line of Pleasure Island 
Road, the northern right-of-way line of Salem Street, the Route 128 
Salem Street on-ramp and the southern right-of-way of Route 128 from 
SR; Single Residence to B Business, or to see what the Town will do 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 175 



about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 30 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw as 
follows: 

A. Amend §190- 76. Definitions, by inserting the following defini- 
tion in the alphabetical list of definitions: 

"BILLBOARD - Any SIGN, regardless of size, which advertises, 
calls attention to or promotes for commercial purposes any prod- 
uct, service or activity other than one manufactured, sold or 
engaged in on the LOT on which the SIGN is located." 

B. Amend §190 - 77. Allowed accessory signs, by adding the follow- 
ing under § 190 - 77 C: 

"4 BILLBOARDS are allowed in a B Business District and I 
Industrial District by special permit granted by the Board of 
Appeals subject to review under §§190-42 through 45." 

or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio motioned to approve, 
which was seconded. 

Fred Emilianowicz, Chairman, Planning Board motioned to 
amend Part B of the motion explaining that they had held a Pub- 
lic Hearing and recommended Favorable Action. 

After much discussion, Laurie Hunt, 1 Terrace Ct. motioned to 
move the question. After calling for the vote. Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

Fred Emilianowicz then motioned to amend Part B of the 
motion as follows: 

B. Amend § 190-77 Allowed Accessory signs by adding the follow- 
ing under §190-77 C: 

Billboards are allowed in a B Business District and I Indus- 
trial District, provided that such billboards be within One Hun- 
dred 100 feet of a federal highway by special permit granted 
by the Zoning Board of Appeals subject to review under Sections 



176 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



190-42 through 45. 

Moderator Carroll called for a majority vote on this amend- 
ment, and declared that the motion is approved. 

Moderator Carroll then called for a vote on the main amended 
motion, and explained that this requires a 2/3 vote. The vote was 
37 YES and 141 NO. Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion 
is defeated". 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 31 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation of 
the parcels shown as Parcels #2B-005-034A, #2B-007-032 and #2B-006- 
033 on the Wakefield Assessors' Maps, being bounded by the Reading 
townline, North Avenue, the Route 128 right-of-way, and the eastern 
right-of-way line of the Boston & Maine Railroad from SR Single Resi- 
dence to B Business, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio motioned for Indefinite 
Postponement, which was seconded. Moderator Carroll called 
for a vote, and declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw 
by amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation 
of the parcels shown as Parcels #2B-005-034A, # 2B-007-032 and # 2B- 
006-033 on the Wakefield Assessors' Maps, being bounded by the Read- 
ing townline, North Avenue, the Route 128 right-of-way, and the eastern 
right-of-way line of the Boston & Maine Railroad from SR Single Resi - 
dence to B Business. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 32 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation of 
certain town-owned land shown as Parcels # 01A-058-24A and # 01A- 
059-31A on the Wakefield Assessors' Maps and located south of the 
Route 128 right-of-way, north of the rear property lines of parcels 
fronting on the terminus of Pierce Avenue, east of the rear property lines 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 177 



of parcels fronting King Street Extension, and east of properties in the 
Lakeview Park Subdivision from SR Single Residence to B Business, 
or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio motioned for Indefinite 
Postponement, which was seconded. Moderator Carroll called 
for a vote and declared that the "motion carries". 

That the Town vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by amend- 
ing the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation of cer- 
tain town-owned land shown as Parcels # 01A-058-24A and ft 01A-059- 
31A on the Wakefield Assessors' Maps and located south of the Route 
128 right-of-way, north of the rear property lines of parcels fronting on 
the terminus of Pierce Avenue, east of the rear property lines of parcels 
fronting King Street Extension, and east of properties in the Lakeview 
Park Subdivision from SR Single Residence to B Business. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 33 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Wakefield Zoning Bylaw by 
amending the Zoning Map by changing the zoning district designation of 
the residentially-zoned remainder of the parcels shown as Parcels # 41- 
026-25A, # 41-028-27, # 41-029-26A, # 39A-W.M.L.D., # 39A-157-31A, # 
39A-158-31AB, # 39A-160-321, # 39A-161-322 and # 39A-162-32BC on 
the Wakefield Assessors' Maps bounded by the western right-of-way line 
of Pleasure Island Road, northern right-of-way line of Salem Street the 
Saugus River Lynnfield townline and the southern right-of-way of 
Route 128 from SR Single Residence to B Business; or to see what the 
Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

At 10:45 p.m. Selectmen Chairwoman Betsy Sheeran motioned 
to adjourn this Annual Town Meeting, which was seconded and 
so voted. 

A true copy attest: Mary K. Galvin, Town Clerk 



178 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
July 23, 2009 



Precincts 


7:00 


1 


12 


2 


6 


3 


13 


4 


10 


5 


18 


6 


12 


7 


15 


Total 


86 



With 86 Registered Voters in attendance, Moderator William Harbison 
Carroll called the meeting to order at 7:01 p.m. in the Galvin Middle 
School Auditorium, 525 Main St., Wakefield. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 179 



Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will vote to approve the budget for the Northeast 
Metropolitan Regional Vocational School for Fiscal Year 2010, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio motioned to approve, 
which was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, 
Finance Committee advised that they had voted Favorable 
Action. After calling for the vote, Moderator Carroll declared 
that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That pursuant to G.L. c. 72 § 16B and every other applicable 
authority the Town disapprove the budget for the Northeast Metropoli- 
tan Regional Vocational School for fiscal year 2010 which was adopted by 
the Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational School Committee on or 
about June 11, 2009. 

At 7:09 p.m., Selectmen Chairman John F. Carney motioned to 
adjourn this Special Town Meeting, which was seconded and so 
voted. 

A true copy attest: Mary K. Galvin, Town Clerk 



180 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



REGULAR TOWN MEETING 

ATTENDANCE 

November 16, 2009 



Precincts 


7:30 


8:00 


9:00 


10:00 


1 


19 


23 


24 


24 


2 


13 


13 


14 


14 


3 


13 


18 


21 


21 


4 


15 


19 


20 


20 


5 


16 


17 


17 


17 


6 


14 


25 


27 


27 


7 


21 


23 


28 


29 



Total 111 138 151 152 

With 111 registered voters in attendance, Moderator William Harbi- 
son Carroll called the meeting to order at 7:30 p.m. in the Galvin Middle 
School Auditorium, 525 Main St., Wakefield. Non-voters were intro- 
duced, and tellers were duly sworn by the Town Clerk. 

Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Committee motioned that the 
reading of the Warrant, with the exception of the Constable's Return, be 
dispensed with, which was seconded and so voted. Moderator Carroll 
read the return. 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 181 



Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 1 

To see if the Town will hear and accept a Report on the Fiscal Year 
2009 Budget, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

TOWN ADMINISTRATOR 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion car- 
ries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to accept a report on the Fiscal Year 
2009 Budget. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 2 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Assessors to use 
such free cash as may be in the Treasury or any part thereof in comput- 
ing the Tax Rate for the fiscal period ending June 30, 2010, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio who 
added that Article 2 is being recommended by the Board of 
Selectmen for Favorable Action, which motion was seconded. 
Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Committee advised that 
they also recommend Favorable Action. Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town authorize the Board of Assessors to use 
$350,000.00 in free cash in computing the Tax Rate for Fiscal Year 2010. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 3 

To see if the Town will vote to accept the provisions of G.L. c. 64L, § 2, 
to impose a tax upon the sale of restaurant meals originating within 
Wakefield by vendors at a rate of three-quarters of one percent .75% of 
the gross receipts of such vendors from the sale of restaurant meals, or to 
see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



182 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee, advising that they voted Favorable Action. Moderator 
Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to accept the provisions of G.L. c. 64L, 
§2, to impose a tax upon the sale of restaurant meals originating within 
Wakefield by vendors at a rate of three quarters of one percent .75% of 
the gross receipts of such vendors from the sale of restaurant meals. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 4 

V 

To see if the Town will vote to amend its local Room Occupancy Excise 
Tax under G.L. c. 64G, § 3A to a rate of up to six percent 6% of the total 
amount of rent for each such occupancy, or to see what the Town will do 
about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted to recommend Favorable Action, 
Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to amend its Local Room Occupancy 
Excise Tax under G.L. c. 64G, § 3A to a rate of six percent 6% of the 
total amount of rent for each such occupancy. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 5 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, receive and expend without further appropriation, a grant 
from the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority for the purpose of 
funding the Town's Infiltration/Inflow Removal Program, and further 
that the Town appropriate a sum of money to fund its portion for the pro- 
gram and to determine whether this appropriation be raised by borrow- 
ing or otherwise, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of DPW Director Richard F. Stinson, which was 
seconded, and Mr. Stinson adding that the Advisory Board of 
Public Works had voted Favorable Action, Daniel W. Sherman, 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 183 






Chairman, Finance Committee advised that they voted Favor- 
able Action, Moderator Carroll explained that this article 
requires a 2/3 majority vote, and declared that the article is 
"unanimously voted". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for, receive and expend a grant/loan from the Massachusetts 
Water Resources Authority in the amount of $516,000, of which forty-five 
percent or $232,200 represents the grant portion and fifty-five percent or 
$283,800 represents the loan portion to the Town by the said Massachu- 
setts Water Resources Authority, for use by the Town for the Town's 
Infiltration/Inflow Removal Program; and further, that the Town autho- 
rize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Board of Selectmen, to 
issue bonds or notes of the Town to the Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority, payable over five years from the Sewer Enterprise Fund to 
carry out the purpose of this article. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 6 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the abandonment of a Sewer 
Easement at #38 Valley Street and the acquiring of a replacement Sewer 
Easement on the same property for the purpose of relocating the ease- 
ment over the existing sewer main, or to see what the Town will do about 
it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 7 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available balances, a sum of money to indemnify certain Police Officers 
of the Town of Wakefield for medical, surgical and hospitalization 
expenses as a result of injuries received as provided for under Section 
100, Chapter 41 of Massachusetts General Laws, in such amount and to 
such extent as may be recommended by the Board of Selectmen, or to see 
what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded and Mr. Maio explaining that the Board of Select- 
men has recommended Favorable Action, and Daniel W. Sher- 



184 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



man, Chairman, Finance Committee advised that they had voted 
Favorable Action. Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion 
carries". 

VOTED: That the Town transfer from the Excess & Deficiency 
Account the sum of $10,000.00 to carry out the purpose of this Article. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 8 

To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Moderator to appoint a 
committee of five citizens to study if the Bylaws of the Town of Wakefield 
should contain a section explicitly concerned with the Annual Town 
Report, and to report its findings and recommendations to the next Reg- 
ular Town Meeting, and to raise and appropriate the sum of $100.00 to 
carry the purposes, or to see what the Town will do about it. Such a com- 
mittee, if established, shall be subordinate to any broader Bylaw Com- 
mittee appointed by the Board of Selectmen. 

ERIC REID 

On the motion of Eric Reid, 25 Chestnut St. #2, which was sec- 
onded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Committee 
advising that they voted Favorable Action, Moderator Carroll 
declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to authorize the Moderator to appoint a 
committee of five citizens to study whether the Bylaws of the Town 
should conatin a section explicitly concerned with the Annual Town 
Report, and to report its findings and recommendations to the next Reg- 
ular Town Meeting, such committee to be subordinate to any broader 
committee appointed by the Board of Selectmen, and to raise and appro- 
priate the sum of $100.00 to carry out the purposes of this Article. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 9 

To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate or transfer from 
available funds a sum of money to hire a Traffic Supervisor for the posi- 
tion at Vernon and Sesame Streets for the remainder of the School Year, 
or to see what the Town will do about it. 

ROBERT D. KEOHAN 

On the motion of Robert D. Keohan, 6 Woodcrest Drive, which 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 185 



was seconded, and Daniel W. Sherman, Chairman, Finance Com- 
mittee advising that they voted Favorable Action, and after 
much discussion. Moderator Carroll declared that the "motion 
does not carry". 

"I move that the Town appropriate by transfer from the Free Cash 
Account the sum of $2,460.13 to hire a Traffic Supervisor for service in 
the mornings for the position at Vernon and Sesame Streets for the 
remainder of the School Year." 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 10 

To see if the Town will vote to amend the Permanent Building Com- 
mittee Bylaw, Article V of Chapter 9 of the Code of the Town, by adding 
at the end of § 9-11 thereof the following: 

"During any period of time when the Committee has ongoing responsi- 
bility for a project, the Committee shall submit periodic written reports, 
not less frequently than quarterly, to the Board of Selectmen and the 
User Agency having an interest in such project, if any, detailing the 
source and disposition of all funds expended, committed or encumbered 
in connection with such project and describing the Committee's efforts to 
comply with applicable laws in the course of completing such project 
including, without limitation, laws relating to competitive bidding, pro- 
curement, construction management, public finance, accounting, ethics, 
public records and open meetings. The Committee shall file copies of the 
minutes of its meetings with the Board of Selectmen and with any User 
Agency whose project is discussed in such minutes promptly after 
approval of such minutes, and in any event not later than sixty 60 days 
after the meeting to which such minutes relate." or to see what the Town 
will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and his advising that the Board of Selectmen rec- 
ommend Favorable Action, and after much discussion, Modera- 
tor Carroll declared that the "motion does not carry". 

That the Town amend the Permanent Building Committee Bylaw, 
Article V of Chapter 9 of the Code of the Town, as set forth in Article 10. 



186 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



ARTICLE 11 

Police Chief Rick Smith motioned to approve, which was sec- 
onded, and Moderator Carroll called for a vote after much dis- 
cussion, and declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town vote to petition the Massachusetts General 
Court as set forth in Article 11. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 12 

To see if the Town will vote to approve the Budget for the Northeast 
Metropolitan Regional Vocational School for Fiscal Year 2010, and, if so, 
to raise and appropriate or transfer from available balances a sum of 
money to fund the said Budget, or to see what the Town will do about it. 

BOARD OF SELECTMEN 

On the motion of Town Administrator Stephen P. Maio, which 
was seconded, and Mr. Maio expressing his appreciation to Town 
Counsel Thomas A. Mullen and Finance Committee School Liai- 
son Alfred A. Palmerino, and Mr. Palmerino advised that the 
Finance Committee voted Favorable Action. Moderator Carroll 
called for a vote and explained that a 2/3 majority was required, 
and declared that by a vote of 151 YES and 1 NO that the "motion 
carries". 

VOTED: That pursuant to G.L. C. 71, § 16B and every other applica- 
ble authority the Town disapprove both the Budget for the Northeast 
Metropolitan Regional Vocational School for Fiscal Year 2010 which was 
adopted by the Northeast Metropolitan Regional Vocational School Com- 
mittee on or about October 8, 2009 and that which was adopted on or 
about November 12, 2009, and that the Town take no action to increase 
the outstanding appropriation for the said School's Budget, which was 
approved under Article 3 of the Annual Town Meeting of 2009 in the 
amount of $1,062,548. 

Presented by Moderator William Harbison Carroll 

ARTICLE 13 

To see if the Town will vote to amend § 1-7 of the General Bylaws of 
the Town by deleting Subsection "A" thereof and replacing it with the fol- 
lowing: 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 187 



"A. Any alleged violation of any of the Regulations of the Board of 
Health, as the same may from time to time be amended, may, in the sole 
discretion of the Health Agent, be made the subject matter of Noncrimi- 
nal Disposition Proceedings commenced by the Health Agent or his 
designee under G.L. c. 40, § 21D.", or to see what the Town will do about 
it. 

BOARD OF HEALTH 

On the motion of Ann McGonigle Santos, Chair, Board of 
Health, which was seconded, and Moderator Carroll called for a 
vote and declared that the "motion carries". 

VOTED: That the Town amend §1-7 of the General Bylaws as set 
forth in this Article. 

January 27, 2010 Springfield, Massachusetts 

We return with the approval of this office the amendment to the Town 
By-laws adopted under this Article on the Warrant for the Wakefield 
Special Town Meeting that convened on November 16, 2009. 

Very truly yours, 
Martha Coakley 
Attorney General 
Margaret J. Hurley, Asst. AG 
Chief, Central Massachusetts Div. 
Director, Municipal Law Unit 
One Exchange Place 
Worcester, MA 01608 

At 10:55 p.m. Selectmen Chairman John F. Carney motioned to 
dissolve this Regular Town Meeting, which was seconded and so 
voted. 

A True Copy Attest: Mary K. Galvin, Town Clerk 



188 



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198th ANNUAL REPORT 



193 



RECORD OF BIRTHS 



2009 



Date 


Name of Child 


January 




3 


Raychel Sienna Fonstein 


6 


Lily Ann Peledge 


6 


Caiden Francis Calvani 


7 


Brayden Gerald Campbell 


8 


Cameron David Smalley 


9 


Caroline Dalton Burns 


: 9 


Molly Hamilton Burns 


13 


Aislyn G. Steenbruggen 


13 


John Howard Duvall 


17 


Chloe Meilan Seto 


18 


Kiera Evangeline Thomson 


20 


Isabella Ortis Mozzer 


20 


Michael John Bisesti 


23 


Eva Rose Reid Fratto 


23 


Thomas Orlando Fratto 


25 


Bailey Sebastian Quimby 


25 


Scott George Costello 


30 


Joseph David Covelluzzi 


30 


David John Vater, Jr. 


30 


Westin Joseph McNeilly 


February 




3 


Katelyn Anne Bergeron 


3 


Nicholas Streker DiFrenna 



Parents 

Matthew John & Adriann Beth 

Fonstein (Upper) 

Justin Patrick & Courtney Marie 

Peledge (Burke) 

Christopher John & Margaret 

Anne Calvani (Crane) 

Leith James & Laura Ann 

Campbell (Luca) 

David Major & Alexandra Marie 

Smalley (Brito) 

Peter Lawrence & Kathryn 

Helen Burns (Quinn) 

Peter Lawrence & Kathryn 

Helen Burns (Quinn) 

Derek Jan & Meghan Lea 

Steenbruggen (Bridges) 

Jeremy Roy & Anne Duvall 

(Keenan) 

Daniel Joseph & Alison Felton 

Seto (Salter) 

Joie Thomas & Natalie Rose 

Thomson (Veccho) 

Claudir Ferreira Mozzer & 

Luciane Schuinot Ortis 

David Alan & Genevieve 

Catherine Bisesti (Hubbard) 

Thomas Michael & Amy Beth 

Fratto (Reid) 

Thomas Michael & Amy Beth 

Fratto (Reid) 

Charles Frederick & Yukyan 

Quimby (Ho) 

Justin Ryan & Jennifer Pauline 

Costello (Michaud) 

Jeffrey Scott & Kerry Lee 

Covelluzzi (Lentine) 

David John & Lori Ann Vater 

(Browinski) 

Liam Frederick & Jennifer 

McNeilly (Crisp) 



Jason Leo & Kathryn Elisabeth 
Bergeron (O'Brien) 
Paul Christopher & Sarah 
DiFrenna (Pearsons) 



194 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



4 Olivia Wade Manzi 

6 Madeline Blake D'Angelo 

6 Joshua Maurice Whitman 

1 1 Benjamin Arthur Levingston 

11 Lucy June Biggio 

17 Simon Lawrence Tisdale 

17 Patrick Ryan Leary 

20 Jacob Frances Apfelbaum 

20 Eliza Lily Knowlton-Young 

23 Trishuli Mandal 

24 Brendyn Thomas Foster 

25 Ariana Mary Fajardo 
25 Nora Jean Tammaro 

27 Charlotte Gibson Gaillard 

28 Sophia Louisa Nelson 
March 

2 Zoe Laura Alper 

5 Jason Joseph Willis 

6 James Richard Cook 

7 Olivia Lorraine Casoli 

9 Brendan Michael Gazda 

10 Brendan Grant Pritchard 
13 Charles Edward Richter 

16 Kaelyn Marie Dishion 

17 Edward John Palmer 
19 Griffin Joseph Steiner 

19 Dillon Alexander Doucette 

20 Molly Elizabeth Smolinsky 



Richard Paul, Jr. & Erin Lynne 

Manzi (Sharkey) 

Matthew Vincent & Angela 

Maria D'Angelo 

James Joseph & Kelley Anne 

Whitman (Keegan) 

Frank Joseph & Mary Yeukling 

Levingston (Ma) 

William James & Allison Biggio 

(Berman) 

Edward James & Christy 

Tisdale (Gay) 

Matthew Michael & Anne 

Elizabeth Leary (Linnehan) 

Michael Adam Apfelbaum & 

Amy Elizabeth Dearth 

Adam Joseph & Kimberly 

Stebbins Knowlton-Young 

Shankar Mandal & Ashita Roy 

Chowdhury 

Jason Thomas & Jannell Rose 

Foster (Orsini) 

Hans Adalid & Wendy Fajardo 

(Leach) 

Paul Joseph & Arlene Joyce 

Tammaro (Wenz) 

Jared Lee Gaillard & Joanne 

Gibson 

Richard Santiago Xavier & 

Jennifer Ann Nelson 



Joshua Daniel & Gretchen Ida 

Alper (Ames) 

Jason Vincent & Rosa Maria 

Willis (Pascuccio) 

Bryant James & Teresa Joann 

Cook (Sordillo) 

Michael Angelo & Kourtney 

Allison Casoli (Izzo) 

Kevin Michael & Kerri Isabel 

Gazda (Brosnan) 

Justin Gregg & Kathleen Bridget 

Pritchard (Kutny) 

Charles Leo & Molly Richter 

(Hogan) 

Daniel Joseph & Leanne Marie 

Dishion (Ferro) 

George Andrew, Jr. & Susan 

Elizabeth Palmer 

Jason Alan & Caroline 

Georgette Steiner (Laband) 

Michael Peter & Morgan 

Elizabeth Doucette (Eisner) 

Spencer Cory & Katie Elizabeth 

Smolinsky (Zmudzinski) 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



195 



20 Molly Elizabeth Smolinsky 

20 Gavin Michael Whelan 

26 Austin Jeffrey Patuto 

26 Caiden Rivers 

27 Travis Jon Reid 

28 Abigail Jeanne Doucette 
30 Patrick Mark Maloney 

30 Wyatt Steven Ares 

31 Grant Rory Neal 

31 Mathew Kollannoor Jacob 
April 

I Hannah P. McKennedy 
3 Kira Lynn Miles 

6 Sean Daniel Marquardt 

8 Matthew Daniel Morris 

8 Benjamin Paul Furrier 

8 Harrison Eric Mahoney 

8 Mathias Ethan George 

9 Yousef Adam Ragab 

II Gannon Paul Curry 

14 Jake Coleman Mastroianni 

14 lia Colombe Carpenter 

14 Lisa May Letchford 

15 Tighe Francis Salsman 

19 Rhys Carter Dhingra 

20 Maxwell Louis Defeo 

20 Maura Elizabeth Riley 

21 Margaret Lynn Haight 



Spencer Cory & Katie Elizabeth 

Smolinsky (Zmudzinski) 

Colin Steven & Emily Whelan 

(Reines) 

Jeffrey John & Debra Marie 

Patuto (Mahoney) 

John Michael & Nadine Marie 

Rivers (Houle) 

Jonathan David & Josephine 

Christina Reid (Ferrigno) 

Eugene Donald, III & Elizabeth 

Andros Doucette 

Michael John & Kyle Eve 

Maloney (Ambrose) 

Richard Ronald & Jeannine 

Ares (Gaudet) 

Rory Christopher & Stacy Neal 

(Reiter) 

Prem Kollannoor & Mili Sarah 

Jacob (Thomas Abraham) 

Mark Christopher & Kelly 

Margaret McKennedy (Poltak) 

Garrett Arthur & Jodi Lynn Miles 

(Silver) 

Daniel William & Danielle 

Marquardt (Caron) 

Timothy William Morris & Sara 

Christie LeSaffre 

Mathew Paul & Julie Ann Furrier 

(Elgart) 

Ryan Albert & Emily Arnrita 

Mahoney (Babine) 

Sheldon L. & Griselda George 

(Guerrero) 

Adam Moustafa Ragab & Randa 

Ehab Mahmoud 

Sean Paul & Arizona Leigh 

Curry (Young) 

David Anthony & Cristen 

Mastroianni (Coleman) 

Craig Morris & Sara Lynn 

Carpenter (Colvin) 

John Matthew & Mary Letchford 

(Bullington) 

Marc Francis & Elizabeth 

Salsman (Phillips) 

Vivek Anand & Catherine 

Dhingra (Bingham) 

Richard Louis, Jr. & Wendy 

Diane Defeo (Power) 

William Patrick, Jr. & Colleen 

Mary Riley (McCormack) 

Francis Carlyle & Karen Marie 

Haight (Towle) 



196 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



22 


Alexandra Grace Cannon 


24 


Ana Mae Polster 


25 


Sean Connor Flynn 


May 




1 


Cole Joseph Bakr 


2 


Madeline Ladd 


4 


Sophia Marie Belanger 


4 


Caroline Grace Sullivan 


7 


Skylar Corinne Cristi 


7 


Caeden Heyd Pothier 


7 


Rhys Michael Murphy 


9 


Nora Clare Fitzgerald 


10 


Daniel Patrick Curran 


11 


John Patrick Maksou 


11 


Brian Thomas Fogarty, Jr 


12 


Madalyn Christine Dill 


12 


Mason Thomas Ridlon 


12 


Rowan James Kavanah 


19 


John Robert Reuland 


27 


Ryan William Murphy 


27 


Leanna Finotti Rothier 


27 


Jake Arthur Skowron 


28 


Gwenyth Rose Munro 


30 


Zachary Evan Jones 


June 




1 


Gavin Anthony Meuse 


1 


Megan D. Van Dorpe 


7 


Taylor Joseph Miller 



Sean Lewis & Carrie Grace 

Cannon (Price) 

Joshua Ethan & Kimberly 

Polster (Banet) 

Connor Daniel & Kamila Flynn 

(Budzicz) 

Adam Douglas & Jennifer Lee 

Bakr(Garue) 

Bruce Timothy & Catherine 

Konold Ladd (Roche) 

David Francis & Jennifer Rae 

Belanger (Varone) 

Kevin Richard & Grace-Marie 

Sullivan (Magnarelli) 

Anthony II & Leah Marie Cristi 

(Duggan) 

Mark Joseph & Lindsay Marie 

Pothier (Heyd) 

Matthew Robert & Amanda 

Lauren Murphy (Hughes) 

Timothy Gerard & Emily 

Frances Fitzgerald (Clancy) 

Patrick Francis & Pamela Jean 

Curran (Ricker) 

John Antoine & Lauren Michelle 

Maksou (Sciortino) 

Brian Thomas & Rosanna 

Fogarty (Pascuccio) 

Philip Edward & Christina Dill 

(Tullo) 

Thomas Paul & Meghan Bliven 

Ridlon (Howell) 

Matthew Joseph & Linda Marie 

Kavanah (Labo) 

Philip James & Rebecca 

Reuland (Scott) 

Sean William & Carla Marie 

Murphy (Poccio) 

Leandro Rothier Rodrigues & 

Bruna Finotti Guadaim 

Jeffrey Thomas & Kirsten 

Skowron (Anderson) 

Derek & Danielle Munro 

(Ursino) 

Clifford George & Kerrie Ann 

Jones (Welsh) 

Jon Douglas & Stephanie Lee 

Meuse (Barrone) 

Peter Joseph & Lisa Van Dorpe 

(Tortolano) 

Chad Taylor & Amy Christine 

Miller (Zagaja) 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



197 



9 Erik Colby Bryant 

9 Kevin W. Mikel Giberti, Jr. 

9 Gina Maria Mitchell 

10 Anthony Michael Caban 
12 Alexandra K. Baumhardt 
16 Alexandra F. Casamassima 
18 Tessa Jill Murray 

18 Marilyn Ryan Mehlinger 

19 Baileigh E. O'Callahan 

22 William Scott Davis 

23 Ciera Lynne Balfe 
23 Allie Marie Degray 

25 Joseph Woods Parmet 

26 Nathan Daniel Weiner 

29 Lydia Charlotte Northrup 

30 Devin James Baldwin 
July 

1 Sydney Rose Catizone 

I Kayla Ann Shaw 

3 Brian Scott Weston 

6 Emma Friederike Broecker 

7 Sean Patrick Dalton 

9 Maeve Gertrude O'Brien 

10 Emmett Gavin Clarey 

II Isabella Maria Panighetti 

11 Myles Michael Danoff 

14 Laila Hussein Atoui 

15 Anna Bella Morrison 



Shawn David & Laura Ellen 

Bryant (Thornton) 

Kevin William Mikel, Sr. & Lisa 

Ann Giberti (Valente) 

Jon Paul & Christine Mitchell 

(Bordonaro) 

Mike & Cassandra Allyn Caban 

(Raymond) 

John Mark Baumhardt & 

Margaret Bell McCarty 

Domenico Casamassima & 

Danielle Rita Ouellette 

Keith Roy Murray & Lee-Ann 

Pepicelli-Murray (Pepicelli) 

Scott Charles & Lesley Anne 

Mehlinger (McClelland) 

Daniel Jeremiah & Andrea 

Robyn O'Callahan (Springer) 

Peter Scott & Jessica D.C. 

Davis (Cassady) 

Mark Hylton & Seanna Cathleen 

Balfe (Poelaert) 

Jason Morgan & Andrea Denise 

Degray (Geaney) 

Matthew Todd & Eileen Mary 

Parmet (Quinn) 

Jeffrey Howard & Katherine 

Anne Weiner (Freeman) 

Charles Rupert & Maryellen 

Northrup (Crowley) 

Mark Campbell & Jennifer Lynn 

Baldwin (Steeves) 

Steven Michael Catizone & 

Tania Loffreda 

Matthew John & Christine Marie 

Shaw (Granade) 

Scott Brian & Heather Ann 

Weston (Hill) 

Mirko & Juliane Broecker 

(Eckard) 

Thomas Andrew, Jr. & Megan 

Dalton (O'Neill) 

Robert Bruce & Jill Marie 

O'Brien (Emerson) 

Steven Richard & Sandra Maria 

Clarey (Brock) 

Emilio Fernando & Ravi Danielle 

Panighetti (Ly) 

Bradley Donald Danoff & 

Melissa Ann Danoff Roberto 

Hussein Mahmoud & Madelin 

Atoui (Rodriguez) 

Mark Alan & Sylvia Morrison 

(Battaglia) 



198 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



15 Allison Elisabeth Maddocks 

16 Adrianna Maria Hudd 

18 Amanda Haley Goss 

21 Lindsay Elizabeth DiFlorio 

27 Caleb Ryan Perone 

27 Caiden Thomas Dempsey 

28 Zachary Michael Kavanagh 
30 Brooke Ann Macaluso 

30 Michael James Viselli 

31 Ellison Alani Sigman 
August 

3 Reese MacKenzie Taylor 

3 Aris Ahmad Sheikh 

7 Meredith Ann Brackett 

7 Jacob Patrick Dalton 

9 Alessandro M. Medrano 

11 Victoria Maria Colantonio 

12 Nicholas George loakim 
12 Teaghan Kinsey Johnson 

17 Kailyn Jean Rose Stelmat 

18 William David Dalton 

19 Camden Robert Keon 

19 Matthew James Rabito 

19 Brynn Karington Hart 

20 Chloe Lankasah Leng 

20 Lily Kathleen Sullivan 

21 Aidan Charles Beauregard 
21 Liam Daniel Sullivan 



Fred Lawson Maddocks & 

Susan Elisabeth Smawley 

Timothy Robert & Kathy Hudd 

(Zaiken) 

Donald Jack, III & Liza Adena 

Goss (Brass) 

Matthew & Kathleen Elizabeth 

DiFlorio (Gallagher) 

Mario & Kristen Elizabeth 

Perone (Prieskorn) 

Robert Allen & Lisa Marie 

Dempsey (Ponte) 

Cory Patrick & Jennifer Lynn 

Kavanagh (Simili) 

Brian Donald & Margaret Ann 

Macaluso (Dorn) 

Michael Joseph & Tracey Viselli 

(Kehoe) 

Eric Michel & Lisa Catherine 

Sigman (Long) 

James Francis & Danielle Marie 

Taylor (D'Agostino) 

Arshid Ahmad Sheikh & Golsa 

Eftekhar Hosseini 

Christian & Diane Theresa 

Brackett (Ingalls) 

Brendan Francis & Caroline 

Dalton (Burgess) 

Thomas Joseph Medrano & 

Maria Alesandra Medrano 

Peter Thomas & Nona 

Colantonio (Tkacheva) 

George & Marianela Ana loakim 

(Zagaria) 

Timothy Scott & Tonya Kirstin 

Johnson (Tracy) 

Jason Ryan & Jaime Lyn 

Stelmat (Lennon) 

Theodore James & Jennifer 

Dalton (McDonald) 

Brooks William & Roisin 

Catherine Keon (Cox) 

Luciano & Jennifer Marie Rabito 

(MacSweeney) 

Christopher Glen & Cassandra 

Hart (Doren) 

Craran & Angela Joy Leng 

(Wallace) 

Brian Thomas & Kelly Marie 

Sullivan (Vinciguerra) 

Jeffrey Richard & Sandra 

Katherine Beauregard 

James Joseph & Shannon 

Marie Sullivan (Slater) 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



199 



21 Megan Margaret Brodigan 

21 Bree McGrew Mertens 

25 Mia Riley Kasparian 

26 Lauren Elizabeth Pesa 
28 Zachary Louis Chiarella 
30 Maeva C J Chiminje 
30 Patrick William Leahy 

30 Peter James Larrow 

31 Mia Rosa Ciccarello 
September 

, 1 Robert Edward Carlino 

4 Charles Tobin Hughes 

8 James Michael Muraszko 

9 Alivia Emma Ciriello 

11 Emily Autumn King 

12 Nicolas Joaquin Moody 

13 Gracie Elizabeth Gamwell 

14 Cameron William Ettinger 
17 William David Robertson 
19 Ruby Lee DiCarlo 

21 Adrianna Faith Chesna 

21 Kaelyn Marie Collins 

23 Aodhan Patrick Hagan 

23 Hudson Wayne Wilkins 

28 Daniel Joseph Tracy 

29 Ryan Jeffrey Clair 
October 

2 Edward Joseph Hubbard 



Mark Patrick & Michelle 

Brodigan (Bisson) 

Craig David Mertens & Kristen 

McGrew 

Michael Steven & Kimberly 

Kasparian (Raffa) 

Paul Anthony & Karen Denise 

Pesa (Hallisey) 

Richard & Sonia Giovanna 

Chiarella (Zeraschi) 

Francis Pango & Sylvie Nadine 

Chiminje (Miaffo Tsafo) 

Michael William & Courtney M. 

Leahy (Curran) 

Jay Francis & Allison Marie 

Larrow (Butler) 

Cosmo Mario & Carmelina 

DeFatima Ciccarello 



Robert Jr.& Sharon Rachelle 

Carlino (Farrell) 

Gregory Tobin & Elaine Anne 

Hughes (O'Brien) 

Michael Steven & Jill Marie 

Muraszko (Lombardelli) 

Roberto Antonio & Angela 

Ciriello (Luongo) 

Clifford Daniel Jr. & Jennifer 

Ann King (Melanson) 

Dallas James Moody & Maria 

Isabel Castro 

Gregory Frank & Kate Grace 

Gamwell(Decker) 

Robert Daniel & Tara Rose 

Ettinger (Lavigne) 

Brian David Robertson & Sarah 

Eileen Bardet 

Anthony Albert & Jennifer Lee 

Dicarlo (Butler) 

James William & Donna Marie 

Chesna (Pesaturo) 

Brian Charles & Kristin Marie 

Collins (Tierney) 

Gary Hagan & Erin Campbell 

Walsh-Hagan 

Patrick Russel & Michelle Marie 

Wilkins (Bradbury) 

Joseph James & Debraann 

Tracy (Newman) 

Christopher Raymond & Victoria 

Jean Clair (Quinlan) 

Eugene & Bertha Hubbard 
(Concepcion) 



200 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



2 


Dylan Michael Power 


3 


Maya Blake Farber 


3 


Colin Arthur Santos 


4 


Peyton Victoria Knowles 


5 


Brenna K. Gould-Faulkner 


5 


Isaiah David Thome 


6 


Margaret Ketch um 


8 


Brianna Margaret Doren 


8 


Riley Marie Doren 


8 


Bruno Joseph Schools 


17 


Graham Wesley Wilson 


18 


Zeineb Gassoumi 


18 


Clare Joy McCusker 


20 


Ryan Colozzi Wollner 


20 


Jacob William Pincus 


21 


Alivia Rose Rossi 


21 


Tyler Sidney Pincus 


26 


Emma Rose Bruno 


27 


Annabeth Marie Goryl 


28 


Joseph Matthew Shea 


29 


Benjamin David Hatheway 


November 




10 


MacKenzie C. Woods 


10 


Nicholas Robert Hurley 


10 


Jacob Chase Williams 


11 


Patrick Sheridan Crow 


11 


Abigail Mary Jamerson 


12 


Sadie Lynn Spry 



Randall Keith & Alexandra Rose 

Power (Clark) 

Scott Jay & Leigh Meredith 

Farber (Ritt) 

Edra & Julia Anne Santos 

(Smith) 

Stephen Patrick & Susan Mary 

Knowles (Baldassaro) 

Larry James Faulkner & Kerry 

Ann Gould 

Rawle David Thome & Sandra 

Lever-Thorne 

Timothy Roe & Carolyn 

Elizabeth Ketchum (Currie) 

Eric William & Andrea Marie 

Doren (Gillis) 

Eric William & Andrea Marie 

Doren (Gillis) 

Benjamin John & Melissa Lynn 

Schools (Truman) 

John Collier Wilson, Jr. & 

Jennifer Linda Kallay 

Habib Gassoumi & Ranen 

Chemkhi 

Timothy Francis III & Lisa Marie 

McCusker (Puccini) 

Gregory James & Kerry Wollner 

(Colozzi) 

Roy Last & Jennifer Sunshine 

Pincus (Vernon) 

Richard Achille & Sonal Rossi 

(Patel) 

Roy Last & Jennifer Sunshine 

Pincus (Vernon) 

Kevin Alan & Christie Marie 

Bruno (Lake) 

Craig Edward & Stephanie 

Diane Goryl (Currier) 

Matthew Joseph & Tracy Ann 
Shea (Bilicki) 
Mark Gerhard & Courtney 
Hatheway (Manning) 

Mark James Jr. & Maria 

Catherine Woods (Colell) 

Sean Patrick & Michele Marie 

Hurley (Giordano) 

Frank & Tonia Leigh Williams 

(Cromack) 

David Michael & Rebecca 

Elisabeth Crow (Sheridan) 

Andrew James & Rachel Lynn 

Jamerson (Currier) 

Gregory Edward & Jacalyn Ann 

Spry (Chisholm) 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



201 



13 


Sophia Marie Tringali 


16 


William Richard Fowler 


17 


Lana Carol Petroules 


19 


Yufay Emma Feng 


21 


Ryan Jackson Dodge 


24 


Tucker James Slack 


26 


Nathan Jesse Citro 


27 


Brayden William Mahoney 


27 


Lauren Elizabeth Mahoney 


December 




1 


Jillian Diane Popovics 


1 


Maya Rose Popovics 


3 


Adrianna Marie Leeman 


7 


Gabrielle Barrington Smith 


8 


Oliver James Douglass 


11 


Dylan Grace Ciulla 


11 


Nicholas Jason Skillings 


15 


Anthony C. Cresta, Jr. 


16 


Zulfah Husna Muzammil 


17 


Seamus Woods Curley 


17 


Marisa Emily Rossi 


17 


Colin Ambrose Doherty 


19 


Molly Helena Recene 


28 


Eveline Lily Putnam 


29 


Grant Douglas Jefferson 


29 


Matthew Tiziano Doto 



Peter Joseph & Laura Michelle 

Tringali (Bentley) 

David Allan & Amy Marie Fowler 

(Morello) 

James Nicholas Jr. & Shaina 

Rahema Petroules 

Weilun Feng & Xiaolei Gu 

Jeffrey Ryan & Anne Marie 

Dodge (Purrington) 

Daniel James, Jr. & Sarah 

McDonald Slack (Collins) 

Timothy Paul & Dawn Marie 

Citro (Jusczyk) 

Bryan Matthew & Sara Mahoney 

(Steinberg) 

Bryan Matthew & Sara Mahoney 

(Steinberg) 

Peter Joseph & Sarah Popovics 

(DeScoteaux) 

Peter Joseph & Sarah Popovics 

(DeScoteaux) 

Gerard William Jr. & Amy Marie 

Leeman (MacDonald) 

Michael John & Karrie Susan 

Smith (Giaramita) 

Benjamin James & Beth Ann 

Douglass (Burrington) 

Michael & Kerri-Lynn Ciulla 

(Durney) 

Jason Charles & Gina Skillings 

(Galante) 

Anthony Christopher & Laura 

Marie Cresta (Roche) 

Mohamed Muzammil & 
Alfiamariyam Mugeeb 

Robert Joseph & Stephanie 

Anne Curley (MacFarland) 

Scott William & Rhiannon Leslie 

Rossi (Belanger) 

Steven Hugh & Lori Michael 

Doherty (Gregg) 

Ronald James, Jr. & Maureen 

Recene (Begley) 

Gregory T.S. & Allison Letha 

Putnam (Rudmann) 

Michael Scot & Danielle Marie 

Jefferson (Boyd) 

Tiziano & Allyson Beth Doto 

(Bruce) 



202 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Record Of Marriages 
2009 





Place of 






Date 


Marriage 


Name 


Residence 


January 








3 


Reading 


Daniel Louis Corcoran 


Wakefield 






Michelle Sinclair 


Wakefield 


6 


Wakefield 


Harish N. Rathi 


Wakefield 






Neha Maheshwari 


Wakefield 


8 


Maiden 


Saud Boussebaa 


Wakefield 






Khadija Laanani 


Revere 


February 








3 


Wakefield 


Maryanne Camay Torres 


Wakefield 






John Gomez Del Rosario 


Wakefield 


16 


Wakefield 


James Frederick Ebert 


Melrose 






Karen Marie Hill 


Melrose 


28 


Reading 


James F. Arsenault 


North Reading 






Jean B. Divincenzo 


North Reading 


March 








14 


Wakefield 


Marie M. Alkena Anestil 


Medford 






Jean Robert Phanord 


Medford 


16 


Wakefield 


Michael David Gaeta, III 


Wakefield 






Melody Zerfoss Horgan 


Wakefield 


28 


Woburn 


Rawle David Thorne 


Wakefield 






Sandra Lever 


Wakefield 


April 








1 


Burlington 


Kimberly M. Hunter 


Reading 






Philip Francis Reed, II 


Wakefield 


25 


Burlington 


Stephanie J. Leccese 


Stoneham 






Philip Joseph Healy 


Wakefield 


27 


Wakefield 


Daniel Gabriel Moga 


Wakefield 






Jacqueline Abbigail Rosa 


Chelsea 


May 








2 


Westford 


Michele Bethany Donoghue 


Wakefield 






Ryan James Holmes 


Wakefield 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



203 



3 


Danvers 


4 


Wakefield 


8 


Wakefield 


16 


Pittsfield 


16 


Groton 


24 


Woburn 


24 


Wakefield 


24 


North Reading 


24 


Maiden 


30 


Melrose 


30 


Melrose 



Salvatore J. Morando, Jr. 
Stephanie Ann Tamilio 
Vincent James Tricomi 
Sonja Marie D'Errico 

Matthew Patrick Barry 

Gina Ann Norton 
Dennis Michael Foote 
Danielle Elizabeth Menard 
Joseph Michael Martin 
Carol Elizabeth Lynch 
Brett J. Litman 
Christina Marie Ouellette 
Lauren Marie Howard 
Nathan Luke Rosencranz 
Charles Coleman Brown, Jr. 
Cacilda Teresa Alexo 
Marcelle Liana Hamboyan 
Charles James Sullivan 
Gardner M. deVOS 
Elaine Paula Hoctor 
Brendan M. McDonough 
Jillian Christine Grenham 



Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 
The 

Woodlands, TX 
The 
Woodlands, TX 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Norwalk, CT 

Norwalk, CT 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Maiden 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Reading 

Reading 



June 




13 


Orleans 


20 


Wakefield 


26 


Danvers 


26 


Wakefield 


27 


Nahant 


27 


Rockport 


27 


Wakefield 


27 


Boston 



Matthew Richard Faulkner 
Sarah Marie Lanzillotti 
Kevin Robert Sullivan Yost 
Shelby McDonald Nikitin 
Erek James Ostrowski 
Eileen Tayag DiMalanta 
Warren Lawrence Bacon IV 

Azita Pourali 
Jessica Leigh Maher 
Scott Vincent Bloomer 
Timothy Aaron Lowell 
Lauren Christa Semanek 
Sonia Maria Maraqa 
John Amador Domingues 
Lindsay Randall 
Jeremy David Clifton 



Stoneham 
Stoneham 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 

Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Franklin, NJ 
Franklin, NJ 
Wakefield 
Wakefield 
Baltimore, MD 
Baltimore, MD 



204 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



27 


Wakefield 


Matthew A.Antetomaso 


Naperville, IL 






Mary Claire Dingerson 


Naperville, IL 


28 


Wakefield 


Michael Tony Rubino 


Wakefield 






Rochelle Marie Stewart 


Wakefield 



July 

5 


Wakefield 


9 


Wakefield 


11 


Sudbury 


11 


Wakefield 


11 


Medford 


18 


Wakefield 


18 


Salem 


23 


Wakefield 


24 


Wakefield 


25 


North Andover 


25 


Salem 


31 


Freetown 


31 


Manchester 
by the Sea 


August 

1 


Wakefield 


2 


Danvers 


2 


Ipswich 



Sandra Pandolph 
Michael Eugene Turner 
Laura Michelle Bentley 
Peter Tringali 
Mark Gary Brodmerkle 
Melissa Lee Brown 
Sarah Elizabeth Marith 
Ryan Bis 

Michelle Madelien 
Richard Arthur Lemay 
Dominic Fazio 
Vania Serafim Arruda 
Loren Gambale 
John Paul Walsh 
David Edward Marshall 
Maureen Hughes 
Vivek Aditya Bhatia 
Anita Arjan Daryanani 
Lisa Michelle Baranowski 
Christopher John Serino 

Kyle William Gross 
Tracy Ellen McLaughlin 
Timothy James Felder 
Katherine Lynn Denehy 
Matthew Newell Reeve 
Cynthia Lee Helmbreck 



Melahat Ela Onay 
Steven Joel Condette 
Heather Anne Prince 
Michael John Nadilo 
Cynthia Ann Brown 
Christina Lyn Veno 



Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Medford 

Melrose 

Melrose 

Melrose 

Wakefield 

Everett 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wheaton, IL 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 
Saratoga 
Springs, FL 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 



Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Australia 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



205 



8 


Wakefield 


8 


Stoneham 


15 


Wakefield 


30 


Wakefield 


21 


Topsfield 


28 


Stoneham 


29 


Boston 


28 


Andover 


29 


Peabody 


28 


Wakefield 


28 


Kingston 


September 

4 


Wakefield 


6 


Wakefield 



12 



19 



19 



Bourne 



12 


Easton 


12 


Topsfield 


18 


Waltham 


19 


Revere 



Revere 



Gloucester 



Jacqueline Katherine Kuks 


Wakefield 


Michael Paul Sokol 


Wakefield 


Tara Elizabeth Forrest 


North Reading 


George A. McCormack 


Stoneham 


Peter S. Hubbard 


Wakefield 


Jaime Ann Prince 


Wakefield 


Edward M. Keating 


Wakefield 


Annmarie Lisa Boudreau 


Wakefield 


Angela Tianna Pontremoli 


Wakefield 


Joseph Robert Macero 


Wakefield 


Julie Elizabeth Mailloux 


Wakefield 


Victor Scott Cappella 


Wakefield 


Stephanie Jean Robson 


Wakefield 


Kevin Paul Tucker 


Wakefield 


Travis James Allen 


Wakefield 


Kathleen Elizabeth Kramer 


Wakefield 


Teresa Lynn O'Brien 


Wakefield 


Kim Figueira 


Wakefield 


Kristen Marie Brogna 


Wakefield 


Brian James Higgins 


Wakefield 


Holly Jo Anderson 


Wakefield 


Ramon Matias Perez 


Wakefield 



Johnson Sung Tak Lam 


Wakefield 


Hung Siv Tang 


Wakefield 


Ellen Marie Dixon 


Wakefield 


Paul John Normile 


Wakefield 


Georgette E. Azar 


Wakefield 


Brett T. Young 


Wakefield 


Robert M. Carbone, II 


Wakefield 


Alisa Brugnoli 


Wakefield 


Jacqueline Marie Snow 


Wakefield 


Bradley Michael Coyle 


Wakefield 


Felicity Ann Senoski 


San Diego, CA 


Matthew Peter Taylor 


Wakefield 


Lisa Ann Costanzo 


Wakefield 


Ryan Francis Schuler 


Wakefield 


Christopher S. Sullivan 


Wakefield 


Jill Frances Blaisdell 


Wakefield 


Blakely Oliver Nicastro 


Framingham 


Andrew A. Calabrese, III 


Framingham 



206 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



19 


Boston 


Andrew Robert Morgan 


Wakefield 






Erin Kristina Schopperle 


Wakefield 


20 


Wakefield 


Jeffrey M. Daly 


Wakefield 






Christine M. Spinale 


Peabody 


20 


Stoneham 


Michael Vaughn 


Wakefield 






Eileen Hanley 


Wakefield 


26 


Andover 


David Anthony Onessimo 


Wakefield 






Kim Ann Giangregorio 


Wakefield 


26 


Wakefield 


Lauren Marie Fahey 


Medford 






Patrick Blair Thomas 


Medford 


26 


Bourne 


Stephen Wayne Vachon 


Wakefield 






Alison Heather Campbell 


Wakefield 


27 


Princeton 


Sara Jean Levendusky 


Wakefield 






Mark Joseph Nasser 


Wakefield 


October 








3 


Andover 


Francis E. Morey, Jr. 


Andover 






Suzanne Marie Sharpe 


Wakefield 


3 


Wakefield 


Caroline Mary Hegarty 


Wakefield 






Christopher John Mahoney 


Concord 


9 


Wakefield 


Dusten Bruce Murden 


Wakefield 






Jessica Marie Bush 


Wakefield 


9 


Wakefield 


Monica Vitale-Ursino 


Wakefield 






Gianluca Toraldo 


Wakefield 


10 


Saugus 


Harlan Christopher Burch 


Wakefield 






Debora Ann McCall 


Wakefield 


16 


Wakefield 


Darin John Conley 


Wakefield 






Kristen Marie Hurley 


Reading 


17 


Wakefield 


Amanda Ellen Looney 


Wakefield 






Michael Joseph Conway 


Reading 


17 


Saugus 


Robert Daniel DiTonno 


Lynn 






Joy Erin McGregor 


Lynn 


24 


Boston 


Audrey Marie Koke 


Wakefield 






Michelle Ann Polischuk 


Wakefield 


25 


Peabody 


Mark Anthony Cyr 


Wakefield 






Tracy Ann Manupelli 


Wakefield 


25 


Danvers 


Allan Edward Raia, Jr. 


Wakefield 






Keriann Golini 


Wakefield 



November 

2 Wakefield 



Nidaa Moheiddin Wakefield 

MHD Ghassan Astwani Wakefield 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



207 



7 


Winchendon 


8 


Wakefield 


14 


Wakefield 


15 


North Reading 


December 




2 


Wakefield 


17 


Wakefield 


19 


Arlington 


' 21 


Melrose 


31 


Pea body 



Alissa Marie McCarthy 
Duane Walter Younkin 
Michael Vincent Taranti 
Danielle Marie Boumel 
Andrew Joseph Jennings 
Leslie Ann Cornetta 
Kathleen T. Connors 
Robert Rollins 



Stephen Silvio deFilippis 
Jessica Lynn Zagarella 
Timothy Edward Malisa 
Madeline Elisabeth Kenney 
Kathleen Marie Brennan 
Jeffrey Steven Daley 
James Theodore Noble 
Cheryl Ann Keyes 
Jill Marie Cataldo 
Mario Michael Ippolito 



Ashburnham 

Ashburnham 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 



Maiden 

Wakefield 

Chariestown 

Shelburne, VT 

Wakefield 

Fresno, CA 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 

Wakefield 



208 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Record Of Deaths 
2009 



Date 



Name 



Age 



January 






1 


Saverio Bizzaro 


89 


1 


Donna Marie Muise 


53 


2 


Robert McGinley 


60 


3 


Aaron Frederick Enoch 


80 


5 


Charlene Viola Spinello 


62 


7 


Velma A. Martino 


80 


8 


Victoria Gheorghe 


88 


8 


Kenneth D. Holtsberg 


67 


11 


Lena Ciulla 


84 


11 


Mary Tom 


53 


12 


MichaelJ. Kilkelly 


66 


15 


Josephine Pina 


94 


15 


Myra E. Faro 


79 


16 


Ellen Allen 


87 


16 


Joan C. Roberto 


78 


19 


Terrance Carano 


67 


21 


Edward E. Haradon, Jr. 


94 


21 


Eugenia Jack 


93 


21 


Irene Surette 


95 


24 


Paul C. Kelley 


85 


25 


Genevieve Tassinari 


90 


27 


William J. Joyce 


76 


28 


Sophie Musto 


93 


30 


Helen Boutiette 


79 


31 


Mary M. Geary 


83 


February 






1 


Linda A. Trefry 


60 


2 


Helen Terfry 


82 


2 


Phyllis M. Dalton 


75 


3 


Sandra Lee Mulcahy 


45 


4 


John J. Duggan 


63 


8 


Carol A. Almeida 


60 


9 


Ethel Monica Winters 


86 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 209 



10 


Robert Haseman 


80 


10 


Ronald Alan White 


57 


13 


Clare Regina Manning 


100 


14 


Anita Maria Rossetto 


59 


15 


Milton Charles Newmark 


99 


16 


Helen B. Zavarise 


84 


18 


Eileen Prosser 


87 


18 


Angela M. Baker 


83 


18 


Margarete Jordan 


95 


19 


Walter E. Havey 


76 


21 


Mildred A. Bishop 


95 


25 


Mary C. Pierce 


83 


28 


Elena Memmolo 


93 


March 






1 


Octavious Maestre 


21 


1 


Francis Joseph Tucker 


83 


3 


Angela L. Graziano 


87 


5 


Norman Brown 


90 


5 


Joseph Fallica 


83 


6 


Jean M. Mercuri 


83 


7 


Lucy M. Masiello 


84 


9 


Lawrence M. O'Brien 


89 


10 


Hazel M. Oldford 


104 


12 


Martha A. Falabella 


80 


12 


Helen Hanley 


92 


13 


Marie T. Cersosimo 


82 


14 


Barbara J. Evangelista 


75 


14 


Lillian Mary Goodwin 


96 


18 


Patricia Donna Chapman 


66 


19 


Rita R. Dunlap 


93 


19 


Mary Ann DiPiero 


64 


19 


James F. Southmayd 


64 


19 


Willard C. Iversen 


88 


22 


Geraldine Frances Allard 


84 


23 


Gladys Drury 


91 


23 


Nancy Murphy 


55 


24 


Alderio F. Berardinangelo 


73 


26 


Mary E. Martello 


93 


30 


Karen L. LaFauci 


43 


31 


Louise T. Carine 


93 



210 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



April 






1 


Francis J. Conley 


99 


1 


Edward Francis Crowell 


70 


3 


Jeanette A. Mills 


70 


5 


Mary L. Lanteigne 


50 


6 


Elizabeth Nolan 


92 


7 


John Guamieri 


90 


7 


Marion Barbara MacKay 


85 


8 


Mary Grace Doucette 


65 


9 


Andrew James Mallett 


28 


9 


Mary A. Dube 


95 


10 


Helen LeClair 


\ 95 


10 


Sarah Jane LeFebvre 


94 


10 


Joseph A. Hagan 


87 


12 


Melvin A. Phillips 


70 


12 


Ernest Edward Kusch 


86 


13 


Claire M. Durgan 


86 


15 


Michael Jerome Goveia 


49 


16 


Stanley Swiecicki, Jr. 


89 


17 


Nancy McMenimen 


64 


18 


Richard J. Encarnacao 


63 


19 


Theresa Sylvia Luciano 


86 


20 


Catherine Regan 


87 


21 


Susan Florence Puglisi 


84 


21 


Robert J. Coldstein 


77 


22 


Elaine M. Melanson 


73 


23 


Francis Johnson 


99 


24 


Gordon Thomas Duncan 


89 


27 


Harriet Lola Bell 


89 


27 


Mary Amato 


93 


30 


Louise A. Whitford 


89 


May 






1 


Roland F. Reardon 


79 


3 


Geraldine C. Corrado 


87 


4 


Rose Marie L. Casoli 


77 


4 


Judith Lynne LaCava 


63 


4 


Anna Migliozzi 


90 


4 


Mary A. Thompson 


88 


4 


Anthony M. Cecere 


91 


6 


James Kennedy 


65 


7 


Bernice Burnham 


92 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 211 



9 


Donna Marie Currier 


56 


9 


Kathleen Theresa Hill 


76 


11 


Alyssa L. Nanopoulos 


19 


13 


Alfred W. Harris, Jr. 


86 


16 


Pellegrina Romano 


93 


21 


Barbara A. Parillo 


74 


22 


Doris Mary Kelley 


82 


23 


Rose T. Coviello 


87 


23 


Victor Damigella 


90 


24 


Philomena M. DiCarlo 


87 


24 


Walter J. Barczak 


82 


26 


Edith M. Corbett 


91 


27 


Frank Agresta 


90 


28 


Victor Rutherford Rivers 


88 


28 


Linda Jean Podolsky 


51 


29 


Mary P. Pietrafitta 


92 


30 


Patrick J. Lucey 


46 


31 


Margaret King 


81 


June 






3 


Helen M. Sheppard 


92 


4 


Patricia K. Borgeson 


84 


8 


Ethel M. Zarella 


79 


10 


Elda Cociani 


75 


12 


Josephine Colella 


92 


13 


Elizabeth Bucchiere 


69 


13 


John James Bergin 


82 


18 


Harry W. Ritchie 


88 


18 


Francis Edward Muse 


93 


19 


Agnes Nicholson 


91 


26 


Thomas E. MacBeth 


61 


26 


Marilyn R. Duggan 


84 


29 


Elizabeth C. Schloss 


86 


30 


Candice Kane Schulze 


57 


30 


Gene Parcellin 


81 


30 


Hector Rodriguez-Mundo 


92 


30 


Frederick F. Marmo 


88 


July 






2 


Paul Anthony Lanzi 


72 


3 


Paul M. Matosic 


80 


3 


Carl F. DiPietro, Jr. 


87 



212 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



9 


Damien A. Hurlburt, Jr. 


48 


9 


Madeline Frances Jason 


84 


11 


Francis J. Endicott 


78 


16 


Richard P. McDermod 


84 


16 


Frederick J. DeVries 


91 


17 


Helen M. Bird 


82 


18 


Eleanor T. MacDonald 


74 


19 


Mary Brogna 


91 


20 


Ellen M. Amorosi 


87 


21 


Edith J. Peterson 


88 


21 


Monica Theresa Horan 


92 


22 


Evelyn Banks 


96 


22 


Eileen M. Voigt 


86 


22 


Charles F. Benson 


82 


24 


Edward T. Gawlinski 


91 


25 


Angela DelGaizo 


88 


25 


Mafalda V. Hurrell 


93 


26 


Alberta E. Confalone 


74 


27 


Concetta A. Puorro 


93 


27 


Gloria DeFrancesco 


83 


27 


Caleb Ryan Perone 





31 


Christopher J. Pattison 


49 


31 


Olga Leard 


83 


August 






1 


Helen Margaret Woodman 


98 


4 


Blanche Alice Crabb 


93 


5 


Norman St. Clair Hebb 


87 


5 


Anna R. DeFronzo 


97 


7 


Rosemary DeMatteo 


94 


7 


Mary Ann Kiddie 


80 


8 


Richard Laramie 


62 


9 


William Hobart Carlson 


77 


10 


Mary Murray 


73 


10 


Michele M. Dignan 


59 


11 


David L. Finnegan 


79 


14 


Josephine Eramo 


101 


16 


Ella M. Dolan 


100 


17 


Gerard Lenners 


79 


19 


Charles B. Robbins, III 


69 


20 


Margaret C. Cassier 


92 


20 


Mildred B. McManuis 


96 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 213 



22 


Mary Madeline Wingo 


85 


22 


Josephine Confalone 


89 


23 


Edward J. O'Brien 


80 


25 


Richard Lewis Dussault 


72 


26 


Mary E. Haladay 


88 


27 


Joan Marie Giannetto 


75 


27 


Edgar Wilson 


85 


29 


Helen Morton 


94 


31 


Roberta Georgina Erikson 


83 


31 


Agnes B. MacDonald 


89 


September 






2 


Dozinda Leria 


88 


2 


Frank A. Peterson 


85 


3 


Filomena C. Miller 


90 


6 


James Francis Lee 


76 


8 


Judy Ann Aversa 


52 


10 


Edouard Joachim 


62 


11 


Robert A. Chadwick 


84 


13 


Delma M. DeAngelis 


87 


14 


Josephine G. Vinciguerra 


97 


15 


Roxie Ananian 


86 


15 


Abelino Perez Martinez 


35 


17 


Phyllis Carmella Gautreau 


85 


18 


Emidio John Danieli 


86 


18 


Joseph A. Gauvin 


84 


20 


Edna A. Dorgan 


81 


21 


Maureen A. Magee 


54 


21 


Louis F. Tecce, Jr. 


81 


22 


Nancy A. Cahill 


52 


23 


Edmund J. Browne 


93 


24 


Joseph Leo Halliwell, Jr. 


76 


30 


George H. White, Jr. 


84 


October 






4 


Robert J. Heinstrom 


86 


4 


Dorothy F. Gregory 


64 


5 


Wilmer F. Potter 


90 


5 


Helen F. Taylor 


89 


6 


Catherine M. Arnold 


89 


6 


Philip M. Dettore 


84 


7 


Jean Morinq Hanson 


83 



214 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



7 


Arthur William Sheppard 


84 


7 


Rosalinda Louise Pierotti 


86 


8 


Allan Meade Carman, Sr. 


59 


8 


Prudence E. White 


92 


10 


Ada Green berg 


85 


12 


Charles Elwin McCoy 


85 


14 


Mary C. Gargano 


89 


16 


Chester Lindquist 


92 


16 


Margaret K. Egan 


86 


18 


William T. Raffoul 


94 


19 


Lorraine D. Oliver 


81 


21 


Marion Eileen Carroll 


63 


21 


Russell H. Nelson 


93 


22 


Armita A. Volpe 


91 


23 


Anastasia Myers 


89 


24 


Paul M. Lenfest 


83 


25 


Mary Filosi 


90 


26 


Eugene C. Bertini, Sr. 


66 


27 


Shirley I. Collins 


85 


28 


Gladys I Wolper 


93 


28 


Dora A. Nohelty 


83 


28 


Charles Veneziano 


75 


29 


Greta Mae Thistle 


81 


30 


Bedford W. Chandler 


72 


November 






3 


Ruth S. Griffin 


82 


4 


Ann A. Murfitt 


61 


6 


Donald H. Louison 


82 


6 


Jane Isabel Fennelly 


71 


7 


Joseph F. Cassidy, Jr. 


84 


8 


Gloria F. Zappala 


84 


9 


Richard John Newman 


38 


10 


Virginia Bellucci 


89 


11 


Mildred Josephine Bennett 


92 


12 


Marie Yvette Fournier 


89 


13 


Blanche Bibber 


99 


13 


Joseph G. Bourque 


83 


15 


Marjorie L. Rotondi 


81 


15 


Bettina Copeland 


86 


16 


Carmela Leo 


82 


19 


Harold F. Nicholson 


85 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 215 



21 


Eugene Levoshko 


24 


Alice S. Will 


25 


Alfred Joseph Yebba 


26 


Valmore J. Cantin 


26 


Ruth L. Saraceno 


28 


William N. Morris 


28 


Alfonsina Santilli 


28 


Evelyn Tuberosa 


29 


Laura Settipani 


30 


Frederick A. Kelly 


December 




2 


Teresa M.Vitale 


5 


John Clarence Gartside 


6 


Norma R. Curley 


7 


Bruno P. Martel 


7 


Michele J. Palmerino 


13 


Patricia Ann Foley 


13 


Helen V. Coombs 


13 


Jacqueline Levin 


17 


Robert Rollins 


17 


Selma Robins 


18 


Winifred L. Harlow 


18 


Bertha M. Babb 


18 


George 0. Richard 


20 


Perina Ann Coviello 


21 


Russell Allen Duncan 


22 


Ruth Murray 


23 


John D. Wales 


23 


Janet Louise Fazio 


25 


Margaret K. McCarte 


25 


Vincent A. Pollino 


27 


Earle R. Fairfield 


29 


Carmelia L. Tavano 


30 


Mary M. Dawson 


31 


Gemma G. Dettore 



71 
75 
83 
93 
74 
79 
89 
88 
88 
70 



90 
66 
100 
82 
82 
80 
93 
74 
70 
83 
91 
99 
77 
81 
82 
94 
78 
71 
93 
86 
83 
78 
88 
72 



216 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



REPORT OF THE TREASURER 

To the citizens of Wakefield 

I herewith present my report for the year ending December 31, 2009 

TRUST FUNDS 

The Trust Funds now in the hands of the Treasurer are as follows: 
Old Cemetery Trust Funds $6,650.00 

Library Trust Funds $143,330.00 

Park Trust Funds $2 1 ,472.00 

School Trust Funds $9,000.00 

Various Trust Funds $28,030.00 

During the Fiscal Year 7/1/2010 - 6/30/201 1 the following loans will fall 
due: 

Principal Interest 

Dolbeare School Bond $542,000.00 $126,400.50 

Library Bond $210,000.00 $13,824.00 

Woodville Bond $35,000.00 $7,95 1 .50 

Woodville Bond $748,000.00 $298,579.00 

Senior Center Bond $109,000.00 $35,073.50 

Public Safety BAN $560,000.00 $282,413.76 

Land Acquisition $65,000.00 $33,003.76 

We are please to report that the interest earned from 1/1/09 to 12/31/09 is 
as follows: 

Revenue $238,040.61 

Trust Funds $28,517.12 



Finances 



Reports of 

TOWN ACCOUNTANT 

Statement of Assets & Liabilities 

Statement of Revenue 
& Expenditures 

Statement of Appropriation & 
Expenditure by Department 

Statement of Indebtedness 



218 TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



Annual Report of 
the Town Accountant 

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 2009 

The combined balance sheet, statement of revenue and expenditure, 
statement of appropriations and expenditures by department, and the 
statement of indebtedness are presented on the following pages. The 
Town's general fund is used to account for the basic operating activities 
such as administration, public safety, public works, education, human 
services, and culture & recreation. The Non-major Governmental Funds 
are used to account for financial resources allocated by law, contract or 
designated to a specific purpose. 

The accounting firm of Powers & Sullivan, Certified Public Accoun- 
tants, currently audits the Town's annual financial statements. The com- 
plete financial statements and the auditors' report are available from the 
Town Accountant and are on file in the Accounting office. Copies of all 
financial reports and ledgers are available upon request during normal 
business hours. 

Kevin M. Gill 
Town Accountant 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



219 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 

BALANCE SHEET 



JUNE 30. 2009 



ASSETS 

Cash and equivalents $ 

Investments 

Receivables, net of uncollectibles: 

Real estate and personal property taxes 

Real estate tax deferrals 

Tax liens 

Motor vehicle excise taxes 

Departmental and other 

Intergovernmental 

Tax foreclosures 

TOTAL ASSETS $ 

LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES 

LIABILITIES: 

Warrants payable $ 

Accrued payroll 

Tax refunds payable 

Other liabilities 

Deferred revenues 

Due to other funds 

TOTAL LIABILITIES 

FUND BALANCES: 

Reserved for 

Encumbrances and continuing appropriations 

Perpetual permanent funds 

Unreserved: 

General fund 

Special revenue funds 

Debt service fund 

Capital projects funds 

Permanent funds 

TOTAL FUND BALANCES 

TOTAL LIABILITIES AND FUND BALANCES $ 





Nonmajor 


Total 




Governmental 


Governmental 


General 


Funds 


Funds 


4,819,319 $ 


4,866.529 S 


i 9,685.848 


- 


2,398,993 


2.398.993 


735,446 


. 


735,446 


124,835 


- 


124,835 


606,100 


- 


606,100 


281,825 


- 


281,825 


117.352 


398,657 


516,009 


8,572.397 


1,018.900 


9.591,297 


201,839 




201.839 


15,459,113 $ 


8,683,079 5 


I 24,142,192 



851.736 $ 


78,562 $ 


930,298 


622,381 




622,381 


434.000 


- 


434,000 


702.202 


- 


702,202 


10,536.817 


1,084,397 


11,621,214 


13,147,136 


1.162,959 


14,310,095 


1,171,519 




1,171.519 


- 


1.455,142 


1,455,142 


1,140,458 


. 


1,140,458 


- 


3,200,740 


3,200,740 


- 


787,441 


787,441 


- 


5,887 


5,887 


- 


2.070.910 
7.520.120 


2.070.910 


2,311,977 


9,832,097 


15,459,113 $ 


8,683,079 $ 


24,142,192 



220 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



GOVERNMENTAL FUNDS 
STATEMENT OF REVENUES. EXPENDITURES AND CHANGES IN FUND BALANCES 



FISCAL YEAR ENDED JUNE 30^2009 



REVENUES: 

Real estate and personal property taxes. 

net of tax refunds $ 

Tax liens 

Motor vehicle and other excise taxes 

Hotel/motel tax 

Penalties and Interest on Taxes 

Payments in lieu of taxes 

Intergovernmental 

Departmental and other 

Contributions 

Investment income 

TOTAL REVENUES 

EXPENDITURES 

Current: 

General government 

Public safety 

Education 

Public works 

Community development 

Human services 

Culture and recreation 

Pension benefits 

Property and liability insurance , 

Employee benefits 

State and county charges 

Debt service 

Pnncipal 

Interest 

TOTAL EXPENDITURES 

EXCESS (DEFICIENCY) OF REVENUES 

OVER EXPENDITURES 

OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): 

Proceeds from refunding bonds 

Payments to refunded bond escrow agent 

Sale of capital assets 

Transfers in 

Transfers out 

TOTAL OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES) 

NET CHANGE IN FUND BALANCES 

FUND BALANCES AT BEGINNING OF YEAR 

FUND BALANCES AT END OF YEAR S 





State Fiscal 


Nonmajor 


Total 




Stabilization 


Governmental 


Governmental 


General 


Fund 


Funds 


Funds 


45,132.592 $ 


- S 


- S 


45.132.592 


76,889 




- 


76.889 


2,942,149 






2.942.149 


269.140 






269,140 


288,744 






288.744 


762,696 






762,696 


16.937,101 • 


511,955 " 


3.377.032 


20.826.088 


1,645.485 




3029999 


4.675.484 






288,043 


288,043 


140.154 




(144,598) 
6,550,476 


(4.444) 


68.194,950 


511.955 


75.257,381 


1.897,071 




899,350 


2.796,421 


7,919,116 




208,207 


8.127,323 


26,806,399 


511.955 


4.320.743 


31.639.097 


6.360,756 




761.583 


7.122,339 






254,493 


254.493 


387.974 




58.276 


446.250 


1,154,923 




298.373 


1.453,296 


9.728,288 






9,728,288 


281.417 






281.417 


9,076.304 






9.076.304 


1.156,475 






1,156,475 






2.068.117 


2.068.117 






1,125,473 
9,994.615 


1.125.473 


64.768.723 


511,955 


75.275.293 


3.426,227 




(3,444.139) 
16.094.000 


(17.912) 






16,094,000 






(16.010.141) 


(16.010,141) 






1,153.337 


1,153.337 


101.159 




3.843.063 


3944.242 


(2,900.000) 




(1,044,242) 

4,036,037 

591,898 


(3.944.242) 


(2.798.841) 




1,237,196 


627.386 




1.219,284 


1,684,591 




6,928.222 

7,520,120 S 


8,612,813 


2,311,977 $ 


- S 


9832,097 



INTERGOVERNMENTAL BREAKDOWN 

ABATEMENTS - Blind, (92,893 00) 

ABATEMENTS - Elderly (33. 1 32 00) 

CHARTER SCHOOLS (195.053 00) 

SCHOOL AID -CHAP 70 (4,361.193,00) 

CONSTRUCTION OF SCHO (987,851 00) 

POLICE CAREER INCENT (204.042 00) 

ADDITIONAL ASSISTANC (1,297,945 00) 

LOTTERY. BEANO, CHAR (2.486,377 00) 

STATE OWNED LAND (25.349 00) 

MTRB GROSS-UP (7.053,000 00) 

Medicare Part D (200,266 00) 



(16,937,101 00) 



There was a reduction in the FY09 Chapter 70 state aid allotment 
and the state used federal stimulus funds to offset this reduction 
This reduction had neither a positive or negative affect on the 
Town's bottom line 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



221 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 



SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT: 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 



Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 



Balance 
Fiscal 2009 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 



Personal Services 
(Includes Town Planner) 
Purchase of Services 

Materials and Supplies 



251 .626.00 

42,980 00 

450 00 



251.509 00 

42,96200 

450 00 



11700 
18.00 
0.00 



117.00 
18.00 
0.00 



TOTAL 


295,056.00 


294,921.00 


135.00 


135.00 


0.00 


Accounting Department: 












Personal Services 


218.232.00 


218.176.00 


56.00 


56 00 




Purchase of Services 


66 300 00 


46.91300 


19.387 00 


1.387 00 


18.000 00 


Materials and Supplies 


2.400 00 


2,400 00 


000 


000 




Sundry Charges 


21000 


105 00 


105 00 


105.00 




TOTAL 


287,142.00 


267,594.00 


19,548.00 


1,548.00 


18,000.00 


Information Technology 












Personal Services 


148.908 00 


148.907.00 


1 00 


100 




Purchase of Services 


75.287 00 


51,816.00 


23 471 00 


471.00 


23.000 00 


Materials and Supplies 


7.700 00 


1,310 00 


6.390 00 


90.00 


6,300 00 


TOTAL 


231.895 00 


202.033 00 


29,862 00 


56200 


29,300 00 


Capital Outlay 


211.771 00 


61,435 00 


150 336 00 


000 


150.336 00 


TOTAL 


443,666.00 


263,468.00 


180,198.00 


562.00 


179,636.00 


TREASURER'S DEPARTMENT: 












Salary of Treasurer 


46.22400 


46.224.00 


000 


000 




Personal Services 


84.692.00 


84.691 00 


1 00 


1 00 




Purchase of Services 


5 500 00 


5.42400 


76 00 


76 00 




Materials and Supplies 


650.00 


64700 


300 


300 




Sundry Charges 


290 00 


290 00 


000 


000 




Tax Titles 


7,000 00 


6,998 00 


200 


200 




Bank Charges 


10500 00 


10.495 00 


500 


500 





154,769.00 



222 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 



LEGAL DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

Sub total 
Legal Damages 

TOTAL 



Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Transfer to 


Encumbered 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Town Revenue 


Fiscal 2010 


87.135.00 


87.135.00 


000 


000 




38,550.00 


37.712.00 


838 00 


838 00 




5.600 00 


5.600 00 


000 


000 




100 00 


000 


100 00 


100 00 




131,385 00 


130,447 00 


938 00 


938.00 


000 


4.560.00 


829 00 


3,731 00 


3,731 00 




135,945.00 


131,276.00 


4,669.00 


4,669.00 


0.00 



COLLECTOR'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary of Collector 
Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 



65.968.00 


65.968 00 


0.00 


83.490 00 


83,487.00 


3.00 


32715.00 


30.442 00 


2.273 00 


1.873 00 


1.604.00 


269 00 


140 00 


115.00 


25.00 


184,186.00 


181,616.00 


2,570.00 



000 

3 00 

2,273 00 

269 00 

2500 



2,570.00 



ASSESSORS' DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 



170,104 00 


169.505 00 


599 00 


15.500.00 


12,664 00 


2.836 00 


1.900 00 


1.148.00 


75200 


525.00 


52500 


0.00 


188,029.00 


183,842.00 


4,187.00 



599 00 

2.836 00 

752.00 

000 

4,187.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



223 



TOWN CLERK'S DEPARTMENT: 

Salary of Town Clerk 
Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


60.676.00 


60.676.00 


000 


81.007 00 


81.004.00 


3.00 


17.000 00 


16.754 00 


246 00 


1 300 00 


1.056 00 


244 00 


150.00 


136.00 


14.00 


160.133.00 


159,626.00 


507.00 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer lo Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 



000 

300 

246 00 

244 00 

1400 



ELECTION AND REGISTRATION: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Material and Supplies 

TOTAL 



20.900 00 


20.149 00 


75100 


751.00 




15.250 00 


12.51700 


2.733.00 


49.00 


2.684 00 


475 00 


168 00 


307 00 


307 00 





36,625.00 



32,834.00 



3,791.00 



1,107.00 



2,684.00 



ELECTION EXPENSE: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 

TOTAL 



25.297 00 
19.050.00 



44,347.00 



20.388 00 
16,617 00 



4909 00 
2433 00 



7,342.00 



4.909 00 
2.433 00 



7,342.00 



0.00 



FINANCE COMMITTEE: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 



2.800 00 


2.727 00 


73 00 


3.300 00 


2.179.00 


1,121.00 


1.000 00 


54900 


45100 


2.760 00 


2.760 00 


000 



73 00 

1 121 00 

45100 

000 



TOTAL 



9,860.00 



8,215.00 



1.645.00 



1,645.00 



224 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 

LESS: Wetland Filing Fees 









DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Transfer to 


Encumbered 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Town Revenue 


Fiscal 2010 


37.419.00 


30.301.00 


7.118.00 


7.11800 




3.550.00 


533 00 


3.017.00 


3.01700 




1.000 00 


232 00 


768.00 


768 00 




600.00 


44900 


151.00 


151.00 




42,569.00 


31,515.00 


11,054.00 


11,054.00 


0.00 


2,125.00 


2.125.00 


0.00 


000 




40,444.00 


29,390.00 


11,054.00 


11,054.00 


0.00 



PLANNING BOARD: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 



5,000 00 


4,060 00 


940 00 


5,325.00 


3,462 00 


1,863.00 


1.600.00 


1.196 00 


404 00 


100 00 


100 00 


000 


12,025.00 


8,818.00 


3,207.00 



940.00 

1.863.00 

404 00 

0.00 



3,207.00 



BOARD OF APPEALS: 

Purchase of Services 



Total General Government 



2,005,614.00 



1,764,901.00 



240,713.00 



40,393.00 



200,320.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



225 



Protection of Persons and Property 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 



POLICE DEPARTMENT: 


Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


Transfer to 
Town Revenue 


Encumbered 
Fiscal 2010 


Personal Services 


3.622.366 00 


3.622,385 00 


VOO 


100 




Purchase of Services 


112.789 00 


108.175.00 


4,61400 


4.614.00 




Materials and Supplies 


145.367 00 


139.780 00 


5.587.00 


5.587.00 




Sundry Charges 


7.400 00 


7.130 00 


270 00 


27000 




TOTAL 


3.687,94200 


3.877.470 00 


10,472.00 


10.472 00 


000 


Capital Outlav Breakdown: 

Cruisers 

Other Equipment 


60.000.00 
53,160 00 


60,000.00 
53.160.00 


000 
0.00 


000 
0.00 




TOTAL 


4,001,102.00 


3,990,630.00 


10,472.00 


10,472.00 


0.00 



FIRE DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 



Capital Outlav Breakdown: 
Equipment Leases - Pumper 
TOTAL 



3.293,39100 


3.293.391 00 


00 


48.000 00 


48.000.00 


000 


80.600.00 


80.591.00 


9.00 


750 00 


195 00 


555 00 


3.422,741,00 


3,422.177 00 


564 00 


132.463 00 


132.463.00 


000 


3,555,204.00 


3,554,640.00 


564.00 



000 

000 

900 

555 00 



564.00 
000 



FIRE ALARM, POLICE SIGNALS AND 
TRAFFIC LIGHTS. 

Personal Services, 
Materials and Supplies 
Purchase of Services 



37.000 00 
6.500,00 
6,500.00 



36.92400 
6.266 00 
6.497 00 



76.00 

234 00 

3.00 



7600 

234 00 

300 



TOTAL 



50,000.00 



313.00 



313.00 



EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT: 

Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 



8.500 00 
3,500.00 



8.500 00 
2.77100 



000 
729 00 



000 
729.00 



11,271.00 



729.00 



226 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



BUILDING DEPARTMENT: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


165.269.00 


165.268.00 


1.00 


7,550 00 


7.065 00 


485 00 


2,800.00 


2,800.00 


000 


400 00 


305.00 


95.00 


176,019.00 


175,438.00 


581.00 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 



1.00 
485 00 

00 
95 00 



581.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

Personal Services 
Purchase ot Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 

TOTAL 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR: 

Personal Services 
Purchase ot Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 
Capital Outlay 
TOTAL 



5,302 00 


5.300 00 


2.00 


300 00 


000 


300 00 


250 00 


11000 


140.00 


85 00 


0.00 


85.00 



5,937.00 



5,410.00 



49.341.00 


49.337.00 


4.00 


2.750.00 


2.747 00 


300 


2.505.00 


2,419.00 


86 00 


3.000 00 


3,000 00 


000 


7,050.00 


7,050.00 


000 



64,646.00 



64,553.00 



200 
300 00 
140 00 
85 00 

527.00 

4.00 
300 
86.00 
000 

000 

93.00 



PARKING CLERK: 

Personal Services 
Purchase ot Services 
Materials and Supplies 

TOTAL 



11,940.00 


11.582.00 


358 00 


8.425.00 


7.408.00 


1,017.00 


50.00 


4900 


100 



20,415.00 



19,039.00 



1,376.00 



358 00 

1.017.00 

1 00 

1,376.00 



Total Protection Persons 
& Property 



7,885,323.00 



7,870,668.00 



14,655.00 



14,655.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



227 



HUMAN SERVICES 

COUNCIL ON AGING: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Mystic Valley Elder Service 
Capital Outlay 

TOTAL 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


154 026 00 


147.997.00 


6.029 00 


5.800.00 


5.28900 


511.00 


9.600 00 


7,796 00 


1.804.00 


6,27500 


6,27500 


000 


0.00 


000 


000 


175,701.00 


167,357.00 


8,344.00 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 



6.029 00 
511.00 

1.804 00 
000 
0.00 



8,344.00 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT: 



Personal Services 


102.157.00 


90.784.00 


11.373.00 


11.373 00 




Purchase of Services 


14.82500 


11.247.00 


3.578 00 


3.578 00 




Materials and Supplies 


2.550.00 


2,550.00 


000 


0.00 




Sundry Charges 


45.555.00 


45.546.00 


900 


900 




TOTAL 


165,087.00 


150,127.00 


14,960.00 


14,960.00 


0.00 


RECREATION: 












Personal Services 


000 


000 


000 


000 




Purchase of Services 


0.00 


000 


000 


000 




Materials and Supplies 


000 


000 


o.oo 


000 




TOTAL 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


0.00 


VETERANS' DEPARTMENT: 












Personal Services 


10.126.00 


10.126 00 


000 


000 




Recipients 


42.500.00 


41.15300 


1.347 00 


1.347 00 




Purchase of Services 


725.00 


411.00 


31400 


314.00 




Materials and Supplies 


250 00 


000 


250 00 


250 00 




Memorial Day 


2.500 00 


2.500 00 


000 


0.00 




Veterans Day 


300 00 


300 00 


000 


000 




TOTAL 


56,401.00 


54,490.00 


1,911.00 


1,911.00 


0.00 


Total Human Services 


397,189.00 


371,974.00 


25,215.00 


25,215.00 


0.00 



228 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



PUBLIC WORKS OEPT. 



PERSONAL SERVICES: 

Personal Service* Breakdown: 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 



Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 



Balance 
Fiscal 2009 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 



Administration 

Engineering 

Fleet Maintenance 

Buildings 

Forestry and Parks 

Cemetery 

Highway 



160.793.00 
143737 00 
234.188 00 
442,153 00 
583,21700 
191.526.00 
716.27400 



123,684.00 
104.847 00 
223.523.00 
428.429.00 
569,520 00 
197,472.00 
758.714.00 



37,109.00 
38.890.00 
10.665.00 
13,724.00 
13.69700 
-5.946 00 
-42,440 00 



37,109.00 
38.890 00 
10.665.00 
13,724.00 
13.697 00 
-5.946 00 
-42.440.00 



TOTAL 

LESS: 

Perpetual Care Income 

Park Trust Funds Available 

To Be Appropriated From The 
Sale of Lots Funds 

TOTAL 

Purchase of Services 

Purchased Service Breakdown: 

Administration 

Engineering 

Fleet Maintenance 

Buildings 

Forestry and Parks 

Cemetery 

Highway 



32.180 00 
136.00 



2,405,572.00 



622.973.00 

11,700 00 
7,450 00 
39.927.00 
354.97300 
81.823.00 
4,150.00 
122.950 00 



32.180.00 
136.00 



2,339,873.00 



622.84214 

12,707 00 
5.349.00 
29,622 14 
373.93100 
82.960 00 
5.331.00 
112.94200 



0.00 
000 



65,699.00 



130 86 

-1,007 00 
2.10100 
10.304.86 
-18,958 00 
-1,137.00 
-1,18100 
10,008 00 



6S.699.00 



130.86 

-1.007 00 
2.10100 
10.304.86 
-18.958 00 
-1.137.00 
-1,181.00 
10.008 00 



TOTAL 



622,973.00 



622,842.14 



130.86 



130.86 



MATERIALS AND SUPPLIES: 

Material & Supplies Breakdown: 

Administration 

Engineering 

Fleet Maintenance 

Buildings 

Forestry and Parks 

Cemetery 

Highway 



471.554 00 


471.554 00 


0.00 


7.100 00 


6.26100 


839.00 


5.300.00 


5.140 00 


160 00 


185.457 00 


179.104 00 


6.353.00 


75.01200 


58.754 00 


16.258 00 


61.560 00 


86.990 00 


-5,430.00 


13,525.00 


8.064.00 


5.461 00 


103.600.00 


127.241.00 


-23.641.00 


471 .554.00 


471.554.00 


0.00 



0.00 

839 00 
160.00 
6.353.00 
16.258 00 
-5.430.00 
5.461.00 
-23.641.00 



0.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



229 



SUNDRY CHARGES: 

Sundry Charges Breakdown: 

Administration 

Eng«eenng 

Fleet Maintenance 

Buildings 

Forestry and Parks 

Cemetery 

Highway 



Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 

2.200.00 

630.00 
400.00 
250 00 
465.00 
230 00 
75.00 
150 00 



Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 

1.866.00 

S26 00 
390.00 
265 00 
21000 
250 00 
75 00 
150 00 



Balance 
Fiscal 2009 

334 00 

104.00 
10 00 
-1500 
255 00 
-20.00 
0.00 
000 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 

Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 

33400 000 

104.00 
10.00 
-15.00 
255 00 
-20.00 

000 

000 



TOTAL 

CAPITAL OUTLAY 

Capital Equip-Highway 

Prior Year Leases 

Cap Equip-Lcase Vehicles 



2,200.00 

126.218.00 

45.477 00 
19.500.00 
61.241.00 



1.866.00 

126.21700 

45.477.00 
19.500 00 
61.240.00 



334.00 

1.00 

0.00 
0.00 
1.00 



334.00 

1.00 

000 
000 
1.00 



126.218.00 



126,217.00 



Total Public Works 



3,628,517.00 



3,562,352.14 



66.164.86 



66.164.86 



0.00 



SNOW AN0 ICE: 

Overdraft approvals viill be charged 
to Fiscal 2010 Tax Assessments 



293.250.00 



923.014.00 



•629,764.00 



•629.764.00 



230 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



PUBLIC WORKS ENTERPRISE DEPARTMENTS 



WATER DIVISION: 

Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 
Professional Medical Services 
Contributory Retire Pensions 
Group Insurance 
Workers' Compensation Ins. 
General Insurance 
MWRA Water Assessment 
Tax Collector (PS ) 
Capital Outlay 
Maturing Debt 
Medicare 









DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 


Appropriation 


Expenditure 


Balance 


Encumbered 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Fiscal 2009 


Balance Fiscal 2010 


738.618,00 


685.036.00 


53.582.00 


53.582.00 


275.527.00 


254.780 00 


20.747.00 


20,747 00 


185,547 00 


164.664 00 


20.883 00 


20.883 00 


1.430.00 


1.275.00 


155 00 


155.00 


325 00 


325 00 


0.00 


0.00 


112,967.00 


112.967 00 


000 


00 


260.659 00 


260.659 00 


000 


00 


8,320 00 


8.320.00 


00 


000 


16,000 00 


16.000 00 


000 


000 


1.470.416 00 


1.449.199 00 


21.21700 


21.21700 


17,720.00 


17,720.00 


0.00 


0.00 


149.361.00 


92.034.00 


57.327.00 


0.00 57.32700 


120.664 00 


86.54100 


34,123.00 


34.123 00 


10,323.00 


10323 00 


00 


000 


3,367,877.00 


3,159,843.00 


208,034.00 


150,707.00 57,327.00 



SEWER DIVISION: 



Personal Services 
Purchase of Services 
Materials and Supplies 
Sundry Charges 
MWRA Sewer Assessment 
Workers' Compensation Ins. 
General Insurance 
Professional Medical Services 
Contributory Retire Pensions 
Group Insurance 
Tax Collector (PS ) 
Capital Outlay 
Maturing Debt 
Medicare 



537.606 00 


537.492.00 


114.00 


11400 




170.989 00 


168.494 00 


2.495 00 


2.495 00 




57.148.00 


42.837.00 


14.311.00 


14,311 00 




600 00 


358 00 


242 00 


24200 




4.757.856 00 


4.688.936 00 


68.920.00 


68.920 00 




7,220.00 


7.220 00 


0.00 


0.00 




9.000.00 


9.000 00 


0.00 


0.00 




325 00 


32500 


0.00 


0.00 




79.151.00 


79.151.00 


0.00 


0.00 




162,288 00 


162.288 00 


0.00 


0.00 




17.720.00 


17.720.00 


000 


000 




193,175 00 


150.936.00 


42.239 00 


708 00 


41.531.00 


310,900 00 


299.344.00 


11.556.00 


11.556.00 




7.408 00 


7.408 00 


000 


000 




6,311,386.00 


6,171,509.00 


139,877.00 


98,346.00 


41,531.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 



231 



EDUCATION 



DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 





Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


Transfer to 
Town Revenue 


Encumbered 
Fiscal 2010 


SCHOOL DEPARTMENT: 












Personal Services 


21.673,140 00 


21.412.671.00 


260.469.00 


260.469 00 




Materials am) Supplies 


1.107.353.00 


1.040.393 00 


66.960.00 


-199.006 00 


265 966 00 


Purchase o( Services 


3.660.343 00 


3.606.465 00 


53.878.00 


-63.406 00 


117.284.00 


Sundry Charges 


17.860.00 


14.706.00 


3.154 00 


3.154 00 




TOTAL 


26,458.696 00 


26.074,235 00 


384.461 00 


1,21100 


383.250 00 


CAPITAL OUTLAY 
LeSS; Available Funds 
Offset Receipts Bus Fees 


154.480 00 
90,000.00 


110.454.00 
90.000.00 


44.026.00 
000 


599 00 

ooo 


43.427.00 


Total School 


26,523.176.00 


26,094.689.00 


428,487.00 


1,810.00 


426,677.00 


LIBRARY DEPARTMENT: 












Personal Services 


903.790 00 


902.023.00 


1.767 00 


1,767 JO 




Purchase of Services 


187.553.00 


173.806 00 


13.74700 


1204700 


1.700 00 


Materials and Supplies 


64.850.00 


64.498.00 


352 00 


352 00 




TOTAL 


1.156,193.00 


1,140,327.00 


15.866.00 


14,166.00 


1.700.00 


LESS: 












Library Trust Fund Income 
Available 


32.718.00 


32.716.00 


0.00 


0.00 





CAPITAL OUTLAY 
Computer Equipment 

Software 

Building Improvement 

TOTAL 

NORTHEAST MET. REG. VOC. 



1.123.47500 


1.107.609 00 


15.866.00 


14.166.00 


1.700 00 


18.018.00 


8.128 00 


9.890 00 


9890 00 




2.77800 


752 00 


2.02600 


2.026 00 




4.000 00 


1.07500 


2.925.00 


2.925 00 




1,148,271.00 


1,117,564.00 


30.707.00 


29.007.00 


1,700.00 


892.935.00 


892.935.00 


0.00 


0.00 





Total Education 



28,564,382.00 28,105.188.00 



459.194.00 



30.817.00 428,377.00 



232 



TOWN OF WAKEFIELD 



UNCLASSIFIED 





Appropriation 
Fiscal 2009 


Expenditure 
Fiscal 2009 


Balance 
Fiscal 2009 


DISPOSITION OF BALANCE 

Transfer to Encumbered 
Town Revenue Fiscal 2010 


STREET LIGHTS 


259360 00 


259.360.00 


0.00 


0.00 


AMBULANCE 


ooo 


000 


000 


0.00 


MISCELLANEOUS 


16.125.00 


14.871.00 


1,254 00 


1.254.00 


HISTORICAL COMMISSION 


550 00 


546.00 


4.00 


4.00 


GENERAL INSURANCE 


290,269 00 


281.417.00 


8,852.00 


8.852.00 


MEDICARE 


424.500.00 


404.253.00 


20,247.00 


20.247.00 


UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE 


81.786.00 


74.716.00 


7.070.00 


7.070.00 


RESERVE FUND 


250.000.00 


249.340.00 


660.00 


660 00 


Total Unclassified 


1,322,590.00 


1,284,503.00 


38,087.00 


38,087.00 0.00 


BENEFITS & ADMINISTRATION 










PERSONAL SERVICES 


93,556.00 


93.552.00 


4.00 


400 


WORKERS' COMPENSATION 


232.000.00 


216.978 00 


15.022.00 


15.022 00 



PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL 

RETIREMENT SYSTEM: 

Pension Accumulation Fund 

Non-Contributory Pension Fund 
Assessments, Non-Contributory 
Veterans Pension Fund 

Total Benefits & Admin. 



2.610,196.00 
71,194.00 

401 00 



2.610.196 00 

64.691.00 

401 00 



000 

6,503.00 

0.00 



0.00 

6.503 00 

0.00 



3,011,915.00 



2,990,386.00 



21,529.00 



21,529.00 



CONTRIBUTORY GROUP HEALTH 
AND LIFE INSURANCE: 



Town & School Appropriation 

Total Group Insurance 



8,672,476.00 



8,286,806.00 



385,670.00 



385,670.00 



198th ANNUAL REPORT 233 





























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198th ANNUAL REPORT 



237 



Index to Town Officers ' Reports 



General Government: 

Assessing Department 16 

Board of Selectmen 14 

Conservation Commission 23 

Contributory Retirement 

Board 24 

Planning Board 21 

Permanent Building 

Committee 25 

Recreation Commission 25 

Town Administrator 15 

Town Officers 2 



Maintenance: 

Director of Public Works 62 

Building Division 73 

Cemetery Division 72 

Engineering Division 65 

Fleet Maintenance 

Division 73 

Forestry & Parks Division . .65 

Highway Division 74 

Sewer Division . . . .79 

Water Division 77 



Protection of Persons and Property: 

Animal Control/ 

Animal Inspector 50 

Building Division 48 

Chief of Police 30 

Chief of the Fire Department . . .36 
Emergency Management 

Director 46 

Fire Alarm & Traffic Signal ... .45 

Gas Division 49 

Parking Clerk 36 

Plumbing Division 48 

Sealer of Weights and 

Measures 50 

Wire Division 49 

Health and Welfare: 

Board of Health 54 

Council on Aging 58 

Housing Authority 56 



Education: 

Library Director & Staff . 99 

Library Trustees 98 

School Committee and 

Superintendent of Schools . .84 
Northeast Metropolitan 

Regional Vocational 

School District 112 



Public Service: 

Municipal Gas & Light 
Department 



.130 



Vital Statistics: 

Births 193 

Deaths 208 

Marriages 202 

Town Clerk Reports 135 

Election Results 188 

Town Meetings, Annual 136 

Town Meetings, Regular 180 

Town Meetings, Special 178 

Treasurer's Report 216 



INDEX TO TOWN ACCOUNTANTS REPORT 

Accountant's Statement 218 

Analysis of General Fund Revenues 219 

Expenditures by Department 221 

Reserve Fund Transfer Analysis 235 

Special Articles — Summary 234 

Schedule of Outstanding Indebtedness 236 



Form of Bequest 



I hereby give and bequeath 

to the Friends of the Council on Aging, 

Wakefield, Mass., 

the sum of dollars 

to have and to hold, to be used 
for the unrestricted purposes of the said Council. 



Library Form of Bequest 

I hereby give and bequeath to 
the Trustees of the Lucius Beebe Memorial Library, 

Wakefield, Mass., 

the sum of Dollars 

to have and to hold, to be used 
for the unrestricted purposes of the said library. 



Emergency Numbers 

POLICE or Ambulance t^% Jk A 



FIRE Rescue or Inhalator 



Your Town Government 

Assessors 781-246-6380 

Board of Health 781-246-6375 

Collector of Taxes 781-246-6386 

Veterans' Services 781-246-6377 

Board of Selectmen 781-246-6390 

Town Clerk 781-246-6383 

Town Accountant 781-246-6395 

Town Counsel, 545 Salem St. 781-246-6343 

Town Treasurer, 11 Albion St. 781-246-6340 

Building Inspector — wire, plumbing 781-246-6388 

Emergency Management 78 1-246-6430 
Fire Department, 1 Union St. (non-emergency) 781-246-6432 

Memorial Library, Main St. 781-246-6334 

Municipal Light Department, 9 Albion St. 781-246-6363 
Police Department, 1 Union St. (non-emergency) 781-246-6321 

Public Works Department 781-246-6300 

Emergency Water and Sewer 781-246-6318 

Retirement Board 781-246-6396 

School Department 781-246-6400 

Employee Benefits 781-246-6396 

Data Processing Department 781-246-6498 

Animal Inspector 78 1 -23 1 -0< 

Council on Aging, 30 Converse St. 781-245-3; 

Wakefield Housing Authority, 26 Crescent St. 781-245-7; 

Employee Benefits 781-246-6; 

Parking Clerk 781-246-6; 



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